United States

Donkervoort’s Insane Hot Rods Are Finally Coming to the US

Donkervoort’s Insane Hot Rods Are Finally Coming to the US

Donkervoort is ready to cross the Atlantic.

The Dutch automaker has announced that it will finally begin selling its hand-built and ultra-light sports cars in the US. The first model that will be available stateside is quite possibly the company’s most capable: the D8 GTO Individual Series.
Although it was founded in 1978, Donkervoort’s stripped-down, enthusiast-friendly vehicles have never been available to buy in the US before. But entering the US market has been a long-term goal for the marque’s managing director, Denis Donkervoort, who studied marketing and management at Florida’s Northwood University in 2008, according to the brand. And now, thanks to a partnership with Bespoke Imports Group, which will sell and service the automaker’s cars in the US, it’s finally happening.

US-Spec Donkervoort D8 GTO Individual Series 

Donkervoort

“Our entry into the US took time because we needed to guarantee our partner had the same ideals of extreme customer service and customization that we demand, and we could only do this with a partner like the Bespoke Imports Group,” the Donkervoort executive said in a statement. “Fortunately, now Americans can experience the kind of driving purity we could only deliver to Europe up until now.”
Donkervoort’s vehicles are basically the European version of an hot rod. In order to live up to the company’s “No Compromise” motto, each car is designed to be a no-frills speed machine that delivers the purest driving experience possible. This is especially true of the first model that will be available in the US, the D8 GTO Individual. The long-nosed grand tourer weighs less than 1,500 pounds and is powered by an Audi Sport-sourced turbocharged inline-five that can spit out over 400 horses and rocket the car from zero to 60 mph in 2.7 seconds and to 124 mph in 7.7 seconds. The vehicle, which can be customized to your heart’s content, starts at $240,000.

Donkervoort

There’s currently a two-year waiting list for Donkervoort vehicles in Europe, but interested American customers won’t have to wait nearly as long. In preparation for today’s announcement, the company started setting aside cars for US customers. You’ll still want to move quickly, though. Three are already already spoken for and the marque has been getting inquiries from America for some time now.

Don’t worry if you miss out on the company’s first batch of cars for the US, though. It promises “far bigger things” are still to come.
Click here to see all the photos of the US-Spec Donkervoort D8 GTO Individual Series.

US-Spec Donkervoort D8 GTO Individual Series 

Donkervoort

Porsche Unveils a Patriotic 911 GTS Cabriolet to Celebrate 70 Years in the US

Porsche Unveils a Patriotic 911 GTS Cabriolet to Celebrate 70 Years in the US

Porsche has been in the US for 70 years. And to mark that milestone, the German automaker has just unveiled a limited-edition 911 Carrera GTS Cabriolet. The patriotic-themed variant is based on the first car the marque made specifically for the US—the aptly named 356 America Roadster.

The company’s automobiles first started popping up here in 1950, thanks to New York-based importer Max Hoffman. Although the Porsches proved to be a hit with his clientele, Hoffman urged the brand to bring over a lighter and less expensive model that he was sure would sell even better. That car would be the 356 America, which arrived here in 1953. Only 16 examples of the stripped-down convertible were ever built, but it would serve as the catalyst for one of Porsche’s best-known vehicles, the 356 Speedster. It would also serve, decades later, as the inspiration for the 964-generation 911 America Roadster, which was released in 1992 and 1993.

1953 Porsche 356 America Roadster and the 2023 911 Carrera GTS Cabriolet America. 

Porsche

All three America models share common elements: They only come as cabriolets, have manual gearboxes and are rear-wheel-drive. The newest version, which was designed by Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur, is finished in a coat of Azure Blue 356 and has an all-black windshield frame, two touches that nod to the original.
There are some new details, too. These include red and white stripes on the sides with the word “America” emblazoned on them, as well as white “911 Carrera” and red “GTS” badges on its rear. The most striking new flourish, though, is the tri-finished RS Spyder wheels, each of which has a silver face, white spokes and red outer pinstripe.
The cabin is a little more streamlined. Everything, from the steering wheel to the gear shifter to the seats, is covered in black leather. The only flashes of color are red and white contrast stitching on the dashboard, center console and seats, as well as red seatbelts for the rear bench. The doorsills also have an illuminated plate commemorating the 70th anniversary of the 356 America. If you prefer a little more color, there’s an “extended interior package” that adds even more red.

Inside the 911 Carrera GTS Cabriolet America 

Porsche

The rest of the 911 Carrera GTS Cabriolet has been left alone. That includes a twin-turbo 3.0-liter flat-six that can pump out 473 hp and 420 ft lbs of torque. That’s makes it exponentially more powerful than the 356 America, which had a flat-four that produced just 70 hp. Performance upgrades like rear-axle steering and carbon-ceramic brakes are available.

The 2023 911 Carrera GTS Cabriolet America will be available later this year. Supply will be limited to just 115 example for North America, 100 of which will be reserved for Americans, with 15 for Canadians. The patriotic convertible will start at $186,370, about $35,520 more than the standard convertible.
Check out more photos of the 911 Carrera GTS Cabriolet America below

Porsche

Porsche

Porsche

Porsche

President Biden Is Thinking About Electrifying the Presidential Limo, the ‘Beast’

President Biden Is Thinking About Electrifying the Presidential Limo, the ‘Beast’

All it took was a couple minutes behind the wheel of an EV for President Joe Biden to start thinking about how to change his own ride.

Shortly after the president test drove the new Ford F-150 Lightning on Tuesday, White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki revealed that No. 46 is giving serious consideration to electrifying the White House’s fleet of vehicles. This would presumably include all of its cars and SUVs, including the armored presidential limo better known the “Beast.”

“That’s certainly something the president has talked about and is an objective for him,” Psaki told reporters onboard Air Force One, according to a tweet from CNBC’s senior Washington correspondent Eamon Javers.

President Biden test drives F-150 Lightning: “This sucker’s quick!” pic.twitter.com/BoVG04Ro9M
— CSPAN (@cspan) May 18, 2021

The news should come of no surprise. Even before he took Ford’s eagerly anticipated electric pickup for a spin, the president had made loud and clear, in both his words and policies, that he believes the future of automobiles is electric. In January, Biden announced plans to replace the government’s fleet of over 645,000 vehicles with American-made electric cars. The president’s prospective $2 trillion spending plan, which was unveiled in late March, also includes $174 billion to spur the development and adoption of EVs.
Notably, though, Psaki only said the president was thinking about electrifying the White House’s fleet, not necessarily converting it exclusively to EVs. That could mean turning the presidential limo into a hybrid, rather than a purely battery-powered vehicle.
It’s unclear if the “Beast,” which is fortified for the president’s protection, could even function as an EV. The project would no doubt present unique challenges. For security reasons, precious little is known about the car. The current version is made by Cadillac and was introduced in 2018.  Covered in armor and loaded with high-tech security features, the super-sized limo is built on a commercial truck chassis and reportedly weighs between 15,000 and 20,000 pounds, or more than twice the weight of the hulking GMC Hummer EV. That means any potential battery would likely have to work very hard to power the car.
One thing we do know, though, is that while the president is no longer able to drive on the open road, he’s not given up on being a car guy yet.

What President Biden’s Planned $174 Billion Investment in EVs Actually Means for the Market

What President Biden’s Planned $174 Billion Investment in EVs Actually Means for the Market

President Joe Biden wants the electric revolution go mainstream, and he’s ready to commit $174 billion to make it happen.

On Wednesday evening, the president announced a $2 trillion spending plan aimed at rebuilding infrastructure in the US and giving the economy a much-needed boost. Within the proposal, which would be funded by an increase in the corporate tax rate, is a $174 billion investment Biden hopes will spur the development and adoption of battery-powered vehicles.

So, how exactly does Biden plan to make EVs more attractive to American drivers? By addressing two recurring issues: affordability and charging anxiety.

2021 Tesla Model S 

Tesla

Making EVs Less Pricey
Despite a huge increase in popularity, EVs are still a niche product. Battery-powered cars make up just 2 percent of sales and 1 percent of all vehicles on the road. One of the main reasons for this is price. The Biden Administration thinks it has a solution for that in the form of big customer incentives.
A cursory glance at the auto market shows that EVs, by and large, cost significantly more than their gas-powered peers. The reason is simple: Electric car batteries are expensive, costing up to $15,000 for a mid-size sedan. Although costs for lithium batteries are slowly going down, the president wants to offset this premium by offering large tax credits, rebates and incentives to individuals, businesses and governments that buy EVs, as reported in the New York Times.

2021 Ford’s Mach-E electric crossover 

Photo: Courtesy of Ford Motor Company.

Of course, offering customer incentives for EVs is nothing new. Drivers who buy a new EV currently get a $7,500 tax credit for their purchase, but those credits phase out after an automaker has sold 200,000 EVs. That means you won’t get one if you buy a Tesla or one of General Motors’ electric cars today. The administration has not revealed how much the new incentives will be, or what vehicles they will apply to, but one has to assume they will be bigger and with much more generous phase-out limits.
Will these incentives be enough to encourage consumers to buy more EVs and push automakers to increase production? That’s an open question, especially since we don’t know how big they will be. But it’s clear that the administration doesn’t think the current credits are anywhere near enough to move the needle.
Ending Charging Anxiety
Cost isn’t the only impediment to buying an EV. Charging anxiety is also an issue, especially since dedicated EV chargers are nowhere near as common as gas stations. Just look at how much attention is paid to the driving range among the market’s top EVs.

2022 GMC Hummer EV Edition 1 

GMC

The Biden administration’s solution to this is simple: build more charging stations. It plans to build 500,000 stations throughout the country—which would work out to 10,000 per state if they were evenly divided—by the end of the decade, reports CNBC. That’s a huge increase over where things currently stand today. There are currently 41,400 dedicated EV chargers in the US, compared to 136,400 gas stations.
While more chargers is definitely a good thing, their success in alleviating consumer anxiety will  depend on what kind of chargers they are. Just over 10 percent of the today’s chargers are DC fast chargers. They can refill an EV to 80 percent in 20-30 minutes. But most charging stations deliver AC power, which is then converted to DC by the EV itself. A full recharge with AC chargers can take hours depending on the EV. Unless the Biden administration prioritizes the creation of DC fast chargers, potential EV consumers would have to be willing to wait hours to charge their vehicles, which would most certainly factor into sales.  
Still, adding 500,000 stations will go a long way toward easing concerns about EVs running of juice while on the road—and counter the notion that electric cars are merely a flash in the pan.
Delivering on a Campaign Promise
Biden has been telegraphing’s Wednesday announcement since he was on the campaign trail. In the run-up to November’s election, he repeatedly said that he planned to boost customer incentives for buying battery-powered cars and invest billions in improving the nation’s charging infrastructure. Then, in January, during his first week in office, he said he wanted to replace the government’s fleet of cars—which reportedly consists of over 645,000 cars—with American-made EVs.
And the reaction has been swift. Days after Biden made the announcement, GM said that it would phase out the sale of all its gas- and diesel-powered vehicles globally by 2035. Similar announcements from Volvo and Audi have followed. Wednesday’s mammoth spending plan still has some hurdles before it becomes law, but it could be the jolt that both consumers and automakers need to help make EVs the road-going standard rather than the exception.

PHP Code Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com