Tiffany & Co.

You Can Soon View Breakfast at Tiffany’s Original Script at This New Exhibition in London

You Can Soon View Breakfast at Tiffany’s Original Script at This New Exhibition in London

Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s
Displaying over 400 objects from their archives, Tiffany & Co. is launching its debut exhibition titled Vision & Virtuosity at London’s Saatchi Gallery. Celebrating its foundations in New York City from 1837 all the way up to now, the house of the world’s finest diamonds aims to tell its story in a unique way.
Anthony Ledru, President and Chief Executive Officer of Tiffany & Co. shared, “Vision & Virtuosity tells the extraordinary story of one of the oldest luxury jewelers, through its nearly 200-year history of pioneering creativity, legendary craftsmanship and sourcing of the world’s most extraordinary diamonds and gemstones.” He added, “This exhibition perfectly captures our long-standing heritage in bridging tradition and modernity. We are thrilled to share the world of Tiffany & Co. and our unique high jewelry style with London.”
Photo: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co
From high jewelry designs to the brand’s recently acquired Empire Diamond nearing over 80 carats, the exhibition takes guests on a journey of 185 years of its vision and virtuosity that is central to its values. The brand exhibition will also feature Tiffany’s famed window displays and important odes to popular culture, such as the original script from Breakfast at Tiffany’s, the 1961 romance comedy film which centers around the character Holly, who loves the brand store very much.
Photo: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co
Separate themes will be explored throughout the exhibition’s seven chapters, that place front and center Tiffany’s brand identity, heritage, and creative influence. “Since its inception, Tiffany & Co. has held a unique position within culture,” says Alexandre Arnault, Executive Vice President, Product & Communications, Tiffany & Co. “Vision & Virtuosity celebrates the House’s most defining moments, showcases the incredible collection of archives and exemplifies why Tiffany & Co. is such an iconic brand.”
Photo: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co.
Stepping into Saatchi gallery, visitors will dive into the rich history and legacy of founder Charles Lewis Tiffany while also gaining knowledge on the House’s creative forces, such as Jean Schlumberger and Elsa Peretti in the following chapter. The third chapter showcases the Blue Book High Jewelry collection, while the fourth chapter focuses on the heritage of the brand, highlighting the iconic Tiffany Setting engagement ring in 1886. The fifth room is especially dedicated to Breakfast at Tiffany’s, and the subsequent chapter offers a range of diamonds devoted to Tiffany’s creations. Finally, the legendary 128.54-carat Tiffany Diamond will also be available for viewing.
Photo: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co
A catalogue published by Assouline New York, available in two sizes, will also accompany the exhibition’s gift shop from June 10, 2022. The 160-page text will feature the highlights of the exhibition as well as showcase creations by everyone involved including Louis Comfort Tiffany, Gene Moore, Jean Schlumberger, Elsa Peretti, Paloma Picasso, and John Loring.
The “Vision & Virtuosity” exhibition will run from June 10 to August 19, 2022. Tickets will be available from May 2, 2022 on the Tiffany & Co. Exhibition app, on iOS and Google Play app stores, and at the exhibition.
Read Next: Exclusive: Adwoa Aboah is a Fashionable Superwoman in Fendi’s New Peekaboo Bag Film

13 Gorgeous Christmas Gifts To Give the Style-Conscious Woman in Your Life This Festive Season

13 Gorgeous Christmas Gifts To Give the Style-Conscious Woman in Your Life This Festive Season

Yes, it’s that time of year again! Holiday season is just around the corner, so if you’re wondering what to gift the special woman in your life, look no further than our carefully curated wishlist. From sentimental jewels to high-fashion handbags, there’s something for everyone in Vogue Arabia’s festive gift guide.
Take inspiration from Olivia Von Halle’s glorious silk robes and pyjama sets for a special someone who loves to lounge, Prada’s OTM Symbole sunglasses, or a classic Hermés silk scarf and some Gucci leather gloves in bold red. What about the woman who’s obsessed with decorating her house? Consider a scented candle by Diptyque or a novel keepsake box.
If you have a ‘Carrie Bradshaw’ in your life, there’s only one way to her heart: shoes. Treat her to a pair of Aquazzura’s pink bow-tie plexi pumps, or everyone’s favorite Swarovski crystal-embellished heels by Mach & Mach – it doesn’t get more special than that.
No matter the cost, diamonds will always and forever be a girl’s best friend. Look to Chopard or Tiffany for some of the best in bling – these picks promise to be stocking fillers that will last a lifetime. Scroll to find the perfect match for your loved ones, just in time for Christmas and the new year.
Chain pouch bag, Bottega Veneta. AED 14,000
Michael Aram butterfly gingko keepsake box, Amara. AED 953
Happy Hearts cocktail pendant, Chopard. AED 79,421
Rose gold carousel and baies scented candle set at Net-A-Porter, Diptyque. AED 662
Pea coat, Fendi. AED 19,250
Leather gloves with horse bit, Gucci. AED 2,250
Brides De Gala Double Face Scarf 90, Hermés. AED 2,465

Queenie belted floral-print silk-satin robe, Olivia Von Halle. AED 2,675
Symbole sunglasses, Prada. AED 1,600
Bow-tie plexi pumps, Aquazzura. AED 2,433
68 boots in smooth leather, Saint Laurent. AED 6,500
Link earrings in 18k rose gold with pavé diamonds, Tiffany & Co. AED 46,273

13 of Lady Gaga’s Most Dazzling Jewelry Moments Through The Years

13 of Lady Gaga’s Most Dazzling Jewelry Moments Through The Years

Photo: Getty
Lady Gaga has been wowing the world with her bold performances and head-to-toe fantastical looks from the moment she burst on to the music scene in 2008, and jewelry has always firmly been a part of her self-mythologizing role-play – whether she is spinning a tale of outrageous avant-garde or full-blown Hollywood glamour. From her early homemade looks and dramatic costume jewelry to her adoption of a more refined aesthetic, Vogue takes a look back at her most incredible jewelry moments and proves yet again why the performer is a living legend.
2008. In this early TV appearance, a hint of Lady Gaga’s future avant-garde style is on view with her giant kawaii hair-bow and crystal shoulder piece. An oversized crystal ring provides the finishing touch. Photo: Getty
August 2009. Arriving at Tokyo airport in 2009, Lady Gaga channeled a Desperately Seeking Susan-era Madonna with armfuls of punky studded leather bracelets. Photo: Getty
2010. Lady Gaga made sartorial history at the MTV Video Music Awards by appearing in this now iconic dress, designed by Franc Fernandez – but how do you accessorise a gown made from fresh meat? With a neck and arms full of crystals, of course. Photo: Getty
September 2012. For the launch of Fame, her first perfume in 2012, Lady G fully committed as always to the task in hand. From her adorned beehive to her earrings, her jewellery channeled the black and gold design of the fragrance bottle. Photo: Getty
October 2012. For the London launch of the fragrance, she preempted the body jewellery craze that was to come with bejewelled fingers and matching talons dripping in gold. Photo: Getty
February 2015. A more glamorous Gaga emerges as the years go by. For the Grammys in 2015, she went for the green goddess contrast of silver couture and giant emeralds, the latter provided by Lorraine Schwartz. Photo: Getty
February 2015. Taylor Kinney proposed to Gaga on Valentine’s Day 2015 with a six- to eight-carat heart-shaped diamond by Lorraine Schwartz. She shared their happy news on Instagram. The couple split up in the summer of 2016. Photo: Instagram.com
2016. Only white diamonds would do for her (almost) demure look with a Marilyn Monroe-inspired blonde coiffure and make-up at the Golden Globes, where Gaga took home the prize for Best Performance in a Miniseries or Television Film for American Horror Story: Hotel. Photo: Getty
September 2018. The monochrome look was reversed for the Toronto Film Festival screening of A Star is Born that October. Giant white diamond earrings by Chopard stand out majestically against an all-black Armani Privé look. Called the Gardens of Kalahari earrings, they centre on a 25-carat pear-shaped diamond on one side and a 26-carat heart-shaped diamond on the other. The earrings were also worn by Charlize Theron at the 2017 Oscars. Photo: Getty
September 2018. Her engagement ring from ex-fiancé Christian Carino was in the same traditional cluster setting style as Lady Diana Spencer’s engagement ring, but in true Lady Gaga fashion, it was supersized and in a cartoonish pink. Opinion was divided over whether it was a pink sapphire or diamond. Photo: Getty
January 2019. At the Screen Actors Guild Awards, Gaga channeled sophisticated glamour with a diamond, platinum and gold choker with heart and star motifs and butterfly wing gold and diamond earrings from the 2019 Tiffany Blue Book collection alongside several Tiffany T bracelets. Photo: Getty
February 2019. For the Oscars, Lady Gaga wore the 128.54-carat Tiffany Diamond, one of the largest yellow diamonds in the world. Rarely seen out in public since Charles Lewis Tiffany acquired it in 1878, it had last been worn by Audrey Hepburn in a Breakfast at Tiffany’s promotional shoot. It has since had another outing in this year’s About Love campaign starring Beyoncé and Jay-Z. Photo: Getty
January 2021. For her performance of the American national anthem at President Joe Biden’s inauguration, Lady Gaga wore a brooch specially designed for the occasion by Schiaparelli’s Daniel Roseberry. The giant gilded dove of peace spoke volumes about the performer’s feelings on the occasion, and demonstrated the power of a jewel to convey a message. “Jewellery is there to heighten the fantasy of haute couture,” Roseberry told me at the time. “It reminds me a lot of decorating a room. It’s the chandelier that brings the room alive.” Photo: Getty
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

EXCLUSIVE: Tiffany & Co. Unveils Most Expensive Design in Its History

EXCLUSIVE: Tiffany & Co. Unveils Most Expensive Design in Its History

Tiffany & Co. is asserting its expertise in high jewelry by revealing its most expensive piece ever.
The World’s Fair Necklace was unveiled Sunday at a Tiffany event in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, and is bejeweled with a total 180 carats of diamonds, all set in platinum. At its center is an 80-carat oval shape, D color and internally flawless diamond that Tiffany has christened “The Empire Diamond,” named for the New York City icon in the jeweler’s hometown.
And it’s currently available for sale. While Tiffany declined to reveal the necklace’s sticker price, industry experts estimate that it would cost somewhere between $20 million and $30 million. It is the most expensive piece in the jeweler’s history after its famous 128.54 carat “Tiffany Diamond,” which is not for sale and has been labeled by Tiffany as “priceless.” While the Empire Diamond is for sale, Tiffany hopes that whoever purchases it will agree to lend the piece for special brand exhibitions.

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Plans for the necklace were originally revealed by WWD in January. The design takes inspiration from the Tiffany necklace made for the 1939 World’s Fair, which was originally set with an aquamarine stone weighing in excess of 200 carats.

The World’s Fair Necklace from Tiffany & Co.
Chelsie Craig/WWD

When the 1939 World’s Fair was held in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in New York City’s borough of Queens, Tiffany set up an extravagant display of new jewelry expressly designed in the American Art Deco aesthetic on which the jeweler grew its name.
In 2020, Tiffany’s archivists unearthed an original sketch for the necklace, depicted not with an aquamarine but a very large diamond.
For Tiffany & Co. chief gemologist Victoria Reynolds, the sketch’s discovery was serendipitous. “A short time later we were presented the opportunity to work with an incredible 80-carat diamond and I looked at the diamond and thought, ‘This is how we reimagine that [World’s Fair] necklace,’” she said.
The necklace’s 1939 iteration was set with a 200-carat aquamarine stone, 429 diamonds and it was priced at $28,000 (or about $557,000 by today’s value). By contrast, today’s version features a total of 578 diamonds, including the Empire Diamond, along with 353 round brilliant stones and 224 custom-cut baguettes. The piece took two years to complete from its initial concept phase.
As is customary of Tiffany & Co. diamonds since mid-2020, the Empire Diamond is fully traceable — it was mined in Botswana, cut and polished in Israel and set in Tiffany’s workshop in New York City.
Looking to further evolve the World’s Fair Necklace’s design, Tiffany included an element of versatility. The Empire Diamond can be popped out and mounted onto a ring by carefully unscrewing a few small fasteners around the stone. Whoever purchases the design will be bestowed with a lifetime service — a Tiffany jeweler will remain on-call to convert the piece from a necklace to ring or vice versa.

The Empire Diamond can be popped out and mounted onto a ring by carefully unscrewing a few small fasteners around the stone.
Chelsie Craig/WWD

“It’s a new twist — something to add to it and improve from a technical standpoint. We considered our incredible jewelers’ skills and also modern engineering to [evolve the piece],” said Reynolds.
The World’s Fair Necklace was unveiled Sunday evening in Dubai, where Tiffany held the fourth leg of its high jewelry Blue Book event to sell its most extraordinary designs of the year. The concept kicked off in Shanghai in April, traveled to New York in September and L.A. in October. The Dubai Blue Book event, hosted at the city’s luxury multiuse building ICD Brookfield Place, was being held in concert with Dubai Expo 2021.

Tiffany chief executive officer Anthony Ledru said that high jewelry is as important to the jeweler as ever, and the category is seeing growing traction in global markets. “We are seeing a very dynamic trend for high jewelry and are experiencing the highest level of high ticket transactions in our brand’s history.
“This year’s Blue Book Collection has been very well received — especially with our renewed focus on the historic works of Jean Schlumberger. Money cannot buy history and money cannot buy style — our clients know this. As a result, we had a record year in China and the U.S. for our high jewelry collection. Dubai is the natural next destination for us.”
While in previous years Tiffany had held a large gala to unveil its Blue Book collection in New York by flying in top priority collectors to view its newest creations, pandemic-related travel restrictions have pushed the jeweler to consider a more localized approach.
For Ledru, this strategy plays back to Tiffany’s roots and has been such a success that he hopes to implement it more widely in the coming years. “Our founders have been traveling the world for international fairs since the early days of Tiffany — a practice that was not common at the time,” he said. “Being present in all of the key markets in the world is in line with our company’s DNA and we will carry on this legacy. We have a vast global footprint and will build upon that in each market with specialized events…This will give clients the opportunity to engage with Tiffany’s authority in diamonds and colored gemstones on a more intimate level.”
The Dubai event marked Tiffany’s first Blue Book event in the Middle East. Generally in recent months the luxury market has been refocusing its attention on the region, with events and marketing activities particularly anchored in Dubai.
Of this, Ledru said: “Dubai is a city of the future and a city of extravagance…There is a respect for legacy, and a passion for the future, innovation and invention in Dubai — all things that are critical to Tiffany. Our clients in the Middle East are extremely knowledgeable and passionate about the best quality gemstones and diamonds, set in the most intricate craftsmanship and design. While this is the first time we will be showing the Blue Book collection in the Middle East, these markets will continue to be a focus for Tiffany in the future.”

The World’s Fair Necklace is the latest high-profile initiative for Tiffany since coming under the fold of LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton. Two weeks ago, the jeweler unveiled a collaboration with streetwear juggernaut Supreme. Increasingly so, Tiffany is putting a focus on its high jewelry designs in ad campaigns and social media posts as a means to elevate its brand resonance. The jeweler has photographed these precious pieces on celebrities like Hailey Bieber and Jay-Z and Beyoncé in ad campaigns aimed at younger shoppers.
Reynolds, who heads up the design and creation of Tiffany’s most valuable designs, said: “I think it actually reinforces our position as the king of diamonds for the past 185 years. There is nothing new about our commitment for selling incredible stones with extraordinary design and craftsmanship. It’s a continuation of an incredible legacy and history…It’s part of our DNA and part of who we will be as we evolve with many exciting things ahead of us.”

Blackpink Takes Paris Fashion Week By Storm: See the Photos

Blackpink Takes Paris Fashion Week By Storm: See the Photos

Though only half of them have touched down so far, the girls of Blackpink have taken Paris Fashion Week by storm.
The four members, Jisoo, Rosé, Jennie and Lisa are global ambassadors for the French fashion houses Dior, Saint Laurent, Chanel and Celine, respectively, with the former two already making a splash with the crowds in Paris.
First up was Jisoo, born Ji-soo Kim, whom many were apparently angling to catch a glimpse of at the Dior spring 2022 show on Tuesday.
For her Paris Fashion Week debut, she wore a mini black-and-white patterned A-line dress from the French label’s 2022 cruise collection, which featured embroidery of the ancient Greek goddess Athena. She finished the look with the micro Lady Dior bag in metallic gold and black platform heels.

Jisoo at the Dior Spring 2022 show during Paris Fashion Week.
Stephane Feugere/WWD

Though Jisoo, as she is known professionally to Blackpink’s fans called “Blinks,” was named the global ambassador for Dior in March, the singer has worked closely with the brand and creative director Maria Grazia Chiuri over the last few years.

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Next was Rosé, coming fresh off her debut at the Met Gala in New York City, who attended Saint Laurent’s spring 2022 show, whose runway was overlooking a brightly lit Eiffel Tower.

Keeping it simple with a little black slipdress by the French label, Rosé, born Chae-young Park, paired it with black knee-high leather boots and layered two gold, jeweled necklaces also by Saint Laurent. She also wore two diamond rings by Tiffany & Co., for which she is also a global ambassador for. She styled her hair in a low ponytail and kept a few strands out to frame her face.
“I’m just really excited to see his new outfits and very honored to be invited again,” she told WWD of the brand’s creative director Anthony Vaccarello. “I love how he supports the strong look for women. I’m just in love with every bit of it.”
In July 2020, after working closely with Saint Laurent for a number of years, she was tapped as the brand’s global ambassador — its first in 59 years. In January, she also became the muse for Yves Saint Laurent Beauté.

Rosé at the Saint Laurent Spring 2022 show during Paris Fashion Week.
Aitor Rosás Suné/WWD

At the Met Gala this year, Rosé made history, becoming one of two K-pop stars, alongside rapper CL, to ever attend the event. For the event, she wore a simple little black dress finished with a giant white bow across the chest from Saint Laurent’s winter 2021 collection. Walking by her side on the red carpet was Vaccarello.
While Blackpink has roots in South Korea, the group’s global fame has accelerated over the last few years, becoming an international pop sensation. Since its debut in 2016, the girl group has broken numerous records, including most viewed music video in 24 hours on YouTube. Blackpink’s hit 2020 song, “How You Like That,” set two Guinness World Records at the time.
With PFW just kicking off, a number of shows have yet to take place. Blinks are eagerly awaiting the arrivals of Jennie and Lisa, who will reportedly attend the Chanel and Celine shows, respectively, later this week and are sure to incite some large crowds.
READ MORE HERE:
Blackpink’s Rosé Debuts at Met Gala in Saint Laurent
Blackpink’s Jennie Is the Face of Chanel’s Coco Neige Campaign

Blackpink’s Jisoo, Elizabeth Debicki and Rosamund Pike on Dior’s Starry Front Row

How Tiffany & Co.’s Timeless Pieces are Furthering its Legacy of Women Empowerment

How Tiffany & Co.’s Timeless Pieces are Furthering its Legacy of Women Empowerment

Already an icon in jewelry design, Tiffany & Co. furthers its legacy of female empowerment and sustainability with breath-taking collections that honor its exquisite gems – as well as the women who wear them.
Suhilah (top left) wears Tiffany HardWear necklace, Tiffany T True bracelet, Tiffany T1 bangle, Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany T1 diamond ring, Tiffany T1 ring, Tiffany HardWear earrings. Noura (left) wears left hand Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany T1 diamond bangle, Tiffany Atlas® X bangle with diamonds right hand Tiffany Atlas® X bangle with diamonds, Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany HardWear earrings; dress, Abadia. Afaf (middle left) wears Tiffany HardWear necklace, Tiffany T diamond bangle, Tiffany T1 diamond bangle, Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger® ring with diamonds, Tiffany HardWear earrings. Sara (middle right) wears Tiffany T1 pendant necklace with diamonds, Tiffany Victoria® Vine ring with diamonds, Tiffany T1 diamond ring, Tiffany Victoria® earrings with diamonds; dress, Self-Portrait at Rubaiyat; pants, Abadia. Aisha (right) wears right hand Tiffany T1 diamond bangle, Tiffany HardWear bracelet with diamonds left hand Tiffany T T1 ring with diamonds, Tiffany HardWear earrings. Photographed by Omniya Alshaikh
When thinking of Tiffany & Co., it’s not difficult to conjure images of a blue box, sparkling diamonds, and Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Since its establishment in 1931 by Charles Lewis Tiffany, the American high jewelry brand has come to be synonymous with quality material and novel design.
However, alongside this feat, the house is known to champion women’s empowerment and sustainability. In 2017, the jeweler reinforced its commitment to women’s rights, human rights, diversity, and inclusion by signing on to the United Nations Women’s Empowerment Principles, and continues to invest in programs to advance gender equality. It also remains committed to protecting the planet, setting for itself major sustainability goals for 2025, which prioritize transparency, appropriate waste recycling and land management, water stewardship, and the well-being of its workers. To celebrate the luxury heritage house’s legacy, Vogue Arabia brought together London-based Saudi entrepreneur Aisha Almamy and her sisters Afaf, Suhilah, Noura, and Sara, to present Tiffany & Co.’s most timeless pieces in the September 2021 issue.
Noura (left) wears left hand Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds right hand Tiffany Victoria Vine ring with diamonds; Tiffany Victoria earrings with diamonds. Aisha (middle) wears right hand Tiffany Victoria® ring with diamonds, Tiffany Victoria® Vine ring with diamonds left hand Tiffany Victoria® ring with diamonds; dress, 16Arlington from Rubaiyat. Sara (right) wears Tiffany T1 diamond bangle, Tiffany Atlas® X bangle with diamonds, Tiffany Atlas® X bangle with diamonds, Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger® Lynn earrings with diamonds; dress, Self-Portrait at Rubaiyat. Photographed by Omniya Alshaikh
A reinvention of the classic Tiffany T collection, the Tiffany T1 expands on the iconic motif that John Loring, the company’s design emeritus, introduced in the early 1980s. Gasconading 18ct rose gold bracelets and rings in wide and narrow widths set with pavé diamonds in a honeycomb pattern, everything from the T1 hinged bangle to the circle pendant aims to represent strength and self-empowerment.
Who can forget the Tiffany HardWear collection released in 2017? Looking to New York City and a unisex bracelet found in the house’s 1971 archive for inspiration, the bracelets, necklaces, earrings, and rings play with tension, proportion, and balance. The Link Bracelet, for example, features large-gauge links in glimmering 18ct rose gold accented by shimmering diamonds, while the Drop Earrings encompass a trio of spheres that dangle from delicate ball chains against captivating locks.
On platinum drop earrings, bracelets, and necklaces, the Tiffany Victoria collection blooms into complex mixed-cut diamond clusters suggestive of flower petals, which can be turned into ornamental headpieces for an unexpected graceful detail. Meanwhile, acclaimed jewelry designer Jean Schlumberger’s works pay tribute to the natural world, with its distinctive bloom of colored gemstones, lending to motifs of wildflowers, twisting vines, and honeybees along with the artisan’s signature X on braided 18ct gold rope rings and the timeless Lynn bracelet.
Afaf (left)wears right hand Tiffany T1 narrow diamond hinged bangle with diamonds in 18ct gold, Tiffany T pavé diamond hinged bangle in 18ct gold left hand Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger® Lynn Bracelet with diamonds in 18ct gold and platinum, Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger® Sixteen Stone ring with diamonds in 18ct gold and platinum; dress, Abadia. Suhilah (right) wears right hand Tiffany T True hinged bracelet in 18ct gold, Tiffany T1 wide hinged bangle in 18ct gold, Tiffany Atlas® X Closed narrow ring with diamonds in 18ct gold, Tiffany T1 narrow diamond ring in 18ct gold, Tiffany HardWear graduated link necklace in 18ct gold left hand Tiffany T1 wide ring in 18ct gold; Tiffany HardWear graduated link earrings in 18ct gold; top, Dolce & Gabbana at Rubaiyat, pants, Philosophy at Rubaiyat. Photographed by Omniya Alshaikh
Atlas X – an update to the iconic Atlas collection – is a nod to the Roman numerals on the clock at the Tiffany Fifth Avenue flagship store in New York City. With powerful angles, clean lines, and statement silhouettes united with graphic simplicity, the collection is crafted from 18ct gold, sterling silver, and pavé diamonds. With three different motifs on earrings, pendants, and more, closed and open forms are juxtaposed in a myriad of textures, robust angles, and modern proportions.
In 2020, Tiffany & Co. launched the Diamond Craft Journey, becoming the first global luxury jeweler to disclose the country where its diamonds and stones are crafted. The journey outlines several steps in the brand’s diamond-making process, including responsible sourcing, cutting and polishing, grading and quality control, diamond setting, and packaging.
Read Next: Beyoncé Wears Audrey Hepburn’s Priceless Breakfast At Tiffany’s Diamonds in Her First Tiffany Campaign
Style: Lina Malaika and Samar EdreesHair: Sawsan LilishMakeup: Eilaf SabbaghOn-set producer: Mohammed JassemProduction: Danica ZivkovicSenior fashion market editor: Amine JreissatiPhotography assistant: Asma AlshaikhMakeup assistant: Maysan HarasaniModels: Aisha, Afaf, Suhilah, Noura, Sara

Beyoncé Wears Audrey Hepburn’s Priceless Breakfast At Tiffany’s Diamonds in Her First Tiffany Campaign

Beyoncé Wears Audrey Hepburn’s Priceless Breakfast At Tiffany’s Diamonds in Her First Tiffany Campaign

Beyoncé and Jay-Z for the Tiffany & Co. Fall 2021 About Love Campaign. Photo: Mason Poole
When you have Beyoncé and Jay-Z starring in a campaign that will hopefully usher in a new era of your brand, you break out the big guns. For Tiffany & Co, that meant adorning Beyoncé in the 128.54 carat Tiffany Diamond previously only worn by three other people (one of them being Audrey Hepburn), along with a host of other luxury jewels.
Of course, the priceless Fancy Yellow diamond on a long chain adorned with over 100 carats of diamonds itself looks right at home around Beyoncé’s neck as she poses for Tiffany’s new About Love campaign, shot by Mason Poole and styled by June Ambrose and Marni Senofonte, and the accompanying video, shot by Black Is King director Emmanuel Adjei. Her hair, styled by Jawara Wauchope and Nakia Rachon, is piled on top of her head in a glamorously unkempt up ’do and her make-up is subtle, save for a dramatic cat eye (perhaps another nod to Hepburn’s Holly Golightly). The priceless necklace matches her 22-carat cushion-cut yellow diamond ring, two of many diamond-heavy pieces she wears throughout the campaign.
Beyoncé and Jay-Z for the Tiffany & Co. Fall 2021 About Love Campaign. Photo: Mason Poole
Jay-Z, in a neat black tux that complements Beyoncé’s curve-skimming, black cut-out dress, has his own fair share of jewels. A Bird on a Rock brooch by Jean Schlumberger, one of the most renowned jewellers of the 20th-century who was once vice president of Tiffany & Co, was refashioned into a one-of-a-kind pair of cufflinks for the rapper. He also wears a striking Apollo brooch in platinum, yellow gold, and diamonds, as well as a slew of other Tiffany pieces including one of their new engagement rings for men.
“Beyoncé and Jay-Z are the epitome of the modern love story,” Alexandre Arnault, executive vice president of product & communications said in a release. “As a brand that has always stood for love, strength and self-expression, we could not think of a more iconic couple that better represents Tiffany’s values. We are honored to have the Carters as a part of the Tiffany family.”

Given it’s the first time the couple has starred in a campaign together, you’d have a hard time imagining what could create more buzz. Which is exactly the point. The campaign ushers in a new era at Tiffany’s under the creative direction of Ruba Abu-Nimah, who was appointed in March. Continuing that partnership, Tiffany will also donate $2 million towards Historically Black Colleges and Universities.
But while the star power will undoubtedly bring in the couples’ fanbase, there are some Easter eggs for Tiffany fans as well. The film pays homage to Breakfast at Tiffany’s with a new version of the song “Moon River,” sung by Beyoncé and captured on Super 8 film by Jay-Z. For art fans, the Carters pose in front of Jean-Michel Basquiat’s Equals Pi painting, which is rendered in Tiffany Blue (part of a private collection, the piece has never been on public display before). The film will be released on Tiffany’s website on September 15. We can’t wait to hear Beyoncé’s take on the iconic song. Until then, these images will be burned in our memory – not least because of the blinding diamonds.
Read Next: Beyoncé Makes a Case for Summer Color Blocking and Micro Bags in New Look
Originally published on Vogue.com

K-pop Stars Are Topping Fashion’s Charts, Too

K-pop Stars Are Topping Fashion’s Charts, Too

How you like that: Fashion brands just can’t seem to get enough of K-pop stars, as bankable for social media engagement as chart-topping songs.
Last week alone saw Louis Vuitton sign on boy band BTS as house ambassadors, and Tiffany & Co. tap Blackpink singer and recent solo artist Rosé as its new global ambassador.
The deals speak to the broad appeal of these musicians, particularly in North America and Asia-Pacific, the two key growth engines for luxury brands, especially during the coronavirus crisis.
“K-pop artists are one of the most universally effective influencers,” said Joo Woo, vice president and divisional merchandise manager of men’s and gifts at Neiman Marcus. “Luxury brands want to tap into Asia’s purchasing power and speak to a younger customer.”

Brands affiliated with rapper G-Dragon — headlined by Chanel — definitely felt the power of K-pop early on, Woo noted. “There were Instagram accounts solely dedicated to what he was wearing, and those items would immediately sell out,” she marveled.
According to data and analytics firm ListenFirst, the influencers featured in luxury fashion posts that have been the most popular so far in 2021 are BTS, various Blackpink members and Kai, plus Harry Styles, Anya Taylor-Joy, Dua Lipa, Dakota Johnson, Billie Eilish and A$AP Rocky.

“The K-pop stars are right in that top tier,” said Jonathan Cohen, content and communications director at ListenFirst, highlighting that the Gucci post that generated the most responses so far this year is a TikTok dance video of Kai, from the South Korean-Chinese boy group Exo.

Rosé for Tiffany & Co. 
Courtesy/Tiffany

“From an awareness perspective, there’s definitely evidence that partnering with K-pop stars provides a huge lift on social media, regardless of what the product is,” Cohen said.
When McDonald’s unveiled a BTS combo meal last week, the fast-food giant got 2.3 million responses on Facebook, TikTok, Instagram and Twitter. To put that in perspective, the McDonald’s tweet, TikTok video, and Instagram post were the three social media posts that generated the most responses for the brand over the past year, Cohen said.
Similarly, when film studio Lionsgate tagged BTS in a “John Wick”-related tweet in October, it generated 90,398 responses — literally Lionsgate’s best performing tweet ever, Cohen marveled.
Recent research from data and insights firm Launchmetrics also underscores the appeal of top music stars from South Korea on social media:
• Vuitton’s top post on its own channels during Men’s Fashion Week in Paris for fall 2021 featured BTS and generated $436,000 in Media Impact Value, topping even the post of Virgil Abloh, Vuitton’s men’s creative director, about his Tourist vs. Purist collection.
• G-Dragon paced nervously on Instagram while waiting for Chanel’s fall 2021 digital show to start, yielding more than four million views and $1 million in MIV. What’s more, he was the fourth top celebrity voice at Paris Fashion Week.
Not that K-pop starts reach all audiences. Those tweeting about BTS in the last 90 days were 81 percent female, 43 percent Millennials, and 36 percent from East Asia, according to ListenFirst. “With most K-pop stars having a younger audience, luxury fashion brands have to factor in both relevancy and if a fanbase will be able to afford your products,” Cohen said.

According to Yu Zheng, founder of the popular Weibo fashion account Fashionmodels with more than 10 million followers, South Korean stars are scoring global ambassadorships thanks to their high level of popularity in China.
He said South Korean entertainment companies like YG and SM that are behind K-pop’s biggest stars “are very good at generating buzz across all social media platforms, including Weibo, WeChat, Xiaoshongshu, Kiashou and QQ, to let the brands feel that they are desirable targets to work with.”
Even though the Chinese government imposed a ban on South Korean pop culture in 2016 due to the deployment of the anti-ballistic missile defense system THAAD in South Korea, entertainment companies still find ways to influence China’s younger generations, he added.
Eric Young, founder of Shanghai fashion boutique Le Monde de SHC and a broker between luxury brands and celebrities, said he is not surprised to see Louis Vuitton sign on BTS.
“In all the markets, Vuitton works with the most in-demand celebrities. The men’s wear business in particular has increasingly seen heavy traces of marketing planning. Each product launch requires a large number of celebrity endorsements, so it makes perfect sense to bind with BTS to amplify brand awareness,” he said.
“I am delighted BTS are joining Louis Vuitton today,” Abloh said in a statement on Friday. “I am looking forward to this wonderful partnership which adds a modern chapter to the house, merging luxury and contemporary culture. I can’t wait to share all the very exciting projects we are working on.”
BTS, an acronym for Bangtan Sonyeondan or “Beyond the Scene,” is made up of seven performers — Jin, Suga, J’Hope, RM, Jimin, V and Jungkook — each of whom has his own style.
Vuitton also boasts a host of famous female brand ambassadors, including Alicia Vikander, Emma Stone, Léa Seydoux, Sophie Turner, Liu Yifei and Naomi Osaka, a three-time Grand Slam winner.
Linda Wang, president of BICG Fashion Group, which helps brands find ambassadors, said signing with top K-pop stars is one great alternative for brands to influence the Chinese market since there aren’t enough high-quality Chinese celebrities for all the luxury brands to work with.

Blackpink member Jisoo in Dior. 
Courtesy of Dior

“There are a lot of Chinese stars with huge online followings, but they are not fashionable enough like the South Korean ones, so luxury brands would rather choose the latter one. That being said, my clients are still very cautious when signing with a South Korean star, especially international brands. They don’t want to be involved in geopolitical disputes,” she said.
L’Oréal on Friday revealed South Korean actor Lee Jong Suk as China brand ambassador, and it was met with backlash and calls for a boycott online because many were offended that the brand would choose a South Korean star instead of a local one for the Chinese market.
Vanessa Wu, business director of Europe at Shanghai-based communication agency Gusto Luxe, advised that while brands are trying to tap into the wider Asia region’s Gen Z luxury demographic, “the selection criteria should be not only based on the traffic those ambassadors can bring on a local or global level, but also on how they embody the brand DNA in the long run.”
Even smaller labels can get a huge boost when a K-pop star wears a design.
Han Chong, founder of fashion label Self-Portrait, said last season he did five production runs of a red cardigan Blackpink member Jennie wore in a Netlix documentary as it sold out whenever it was restocked online and in China. It was one of his bestsellers from last October to April.
On Thursday, Blackpink’s Rosé wore a sparkling Self-Portrait midi dress and a white cardigan with stripes that she bought on her own, and Chong said he could instantly see an uplift in site traffic in the following days.
BTS and Blackpink are the most in-demand K-pop stars now, with all four Blackpink members — Lisa, Rosé, Jennie and Jisoo — helping Dior, Chanel, Saint Laurent and Celine achieve their best-performing posts in recent months. On the day Tiffany revealed it had tapped Rosé, the jeweler was mentioned in 60,188 tweets, an increase of 506 percent compared to the previous day, according to ListenFirst tallies.
Among newer K-pop names on the rise is Aespa. Givenchy received 143,046 responses to an Instagram gallery of the South Korean girl group dressed in its spring 2021 collection, Cohen noted. Only posts featuring Kim Kadashian and Kylie Jenner received more responses for Givenchy in the past  year.

“Additionally, it’s not just K-pop stars that are moving the needle, as K-drama influencers can also provide luxury fashion brands with a big lift,” Cohen added, pointing to a successful Vuitton post featuring South Korean actor Lee Min-ho.
See also:
Blackpink’s Lisa Is on the Jury for ANDAM Fashion Prize: Exclusive
South Korean Boy Band BTS and Fila Launching Capsule Collection
Asian Influencers Boost Audiences for European Men’s Digital Fashion Shows

Elsa Peretti, Jewelry Designer and Former Model, Dies at 80

Elsa Peretti, Jewelry Designer and Former Model, Dies at 80

Elsa Peretti, known worldwide for her jewelry designs for Tiffany & Co., as well as for her previous career as a fashion model, died in her sleep Thursday night at age 80.
According to a statement from her family office in Zurich, Switzerland, and the Nando and Elsa Peretti Foundation, the designer “passed away in a village close to Barcelona, Spain” of natural causes. Peretti had bought a house in the village, Sant Marti Vell, in 1968 and over the decades invested to restore the surrounding village.
“Her legacy comprises a body of exceptional design work as well as a foundation dedicated to humanitarian, environmental and conservation causes,” the statement continued. “A true citizen of the world, her absence will be strongly felt within all the different circles where she played such an active and creative role.”

Peretti first entered the fashion world in the early 1960s as a model in Spain, moving to Manhattan later that decade and joining the Wilhelmina Modeling Agency. In the early ’70s, she became one of Halston’s favorites along with the likes of Anjelica Huston and Pat Cleveland.
Even as she was modeling, however, Peretti was designing jewelry for fashion designers including Giorgio di Sant’ Angelo in 1969 and, two years later, Halston. She won a Coty Award for jewelry design in 1971 and Bloomingdale’s opened an in-store boutique dedicated to her collection the following year. She signed on with Tiffany in 1972, and her minimal designs, especially in silver, immediately became a core part of the iconic jeweler’s offering — at one point representing up to 10 percent of its revenues.

“I don’t have the feeling that I need to add a lot to my collection, because I have an incredibly wide range of things,” Peretti told WWD last October in discussing the endurance of her designs. “But I’m happy to see designs that are so important to me reinvigorated in this way, made even more modern and relevant. This is part of the secret of my things, that they are still valid.”
Ralph Rucci described Peretti as the most important person in his career. “I have always said in interviews that my whole life changed when I saw her in the Seventies. She walked into an event in a black cashmere jumpsuit and stole carrying a brown little paper bag as her minaudiere. The chic was so awesome,” he said.
“She would always urge me, ‘It should all be on your time. Do not rush anything. Creations cannot be rushed.’ I would say, ‘Well, you can’t think like that. You also have to pertain to schedules and so on.’”
When Rucci returned to couture in summer 2019, he dedicated the show to Peretti and invited her. As an homage, the show opened with a model wearing an oversized shirt with transparent shoulders and big black classes and short black hair.
“She is a part of culture,” Rucci said. “Consider what she did in fine design. She revolutionized the idea of decorative jewelry for women who were usually in Van Cleef & Arpels diamonds walking into evening events wearing [Peretti designed] silver cuffs and a horseshoe belt, which I think is good luck. I have it on right now and I wear it every day of my life.”
Unable to attend Sunday’s private service in Spain for Peretti due to COVID-19 travel restrictions, Rucci said he and other close friends have been lamenting that. “I’m just so g–damn angry that we can’t just jump on a plane and be with her, and have a family,” he said.
Rucci recalled how the last time he and Peretti had spoken that she was a little down about the environmental hazards. “She was still filled with joy because, you know, Elsa did so much for so many people. She took care of so many people. And she was loved. She was very maternal apart from her style,” Rucci said. “Elsa said, ‘Think of everything going that is going on with the planet. It doesn’t matter how much that I do.’ That was Elsa.”
A very saddened Carlo Capasa, president of Italy’s Camera della Moda, described Peretti as “a woman who revolutionized the world of jewelry with her avant-garde creations. I will always remember her iconic jewels with an extraordinary and powerful aesthetics, but at the same time feminine and simple.
“Elsa was not only an authentic pioneer in the world of design, but also in her personal life, where through her foundation she always committed to support projects that would benefit local communities, also tackling issues with a global relevance, among which, only to mention some, the preservation of the environment and the biodiversity; inclusivity and social welfare; education and the promotion and protection of human rights and the rule of law. She will surely be missed,” he added.

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