Swimwear

Salma Abu Deif on Forming a Sisterhood and Celebrating Natural Beauty with Her New Swimwear Brand

Salma Abu Deif on Forming a Sisterhood and Celebrating Natural Beauty with Her New Swimwear Brand

Photo: Shahira Zaki. Courtesy of Elma
There’s a new celebrity-founded inclusive swimwear brand to love and covet, and it was born right here in the Middle East. Egyptian actor and model Salma Abu Deif has channeled her passion for women’s empowerment and self-love into Elma, a brand described as a “safe space” by Abu Deif. “More than a brand, it aims to nourish, educate, and help women be more accepting and content in their own skin and bodies,” she shares with Vogue Arabia. “Elma speaks for every woman, and aims to better understand their needs and what women truly want.”

Three years in the making, Elma was launched this summer by Abu Deif on Instagram with a locally shot series of photos that showcase the different pieces in the inaugural drop. “The swimsuit styles are based on what the market responds to, as well as my personal taste,” says Abu Deif. “Our first collection is us testing the waters in the Egyptian and MENA region markets, and we’re all ears to see how our consumers respond.” Seen in the launch campaign are bikinis, one-pieces, lounge sets, maxi dresses and more, ranging from monochrome numbers in bold hues to multicolor prints. “Our pattern is inspired by stretch marks, and the E in Elma’s logo is inspired by the curves of the body,” says the 29-year-old. “Each style has a different story in terms of design and experimentation, as well as color. The creative process was a conversation with our designer, who brought Elma’s vision to life. We talked about how stretch marks are a constant struggle for all women, including myself, to embrace. We also discuss the art of celebrating natural beauty and everything in between, which is what we’re all about.”
Photo: Shahira Zaki. Courtesy of Elma
Elma aims to do away with the notion of the ideal beach body by adopting the slogan, “Your second skin” and celebrating natural beauty. Driven by Abu Deif’s goal to form a sisterhood, Elma is on its way to being a community-oriented swimwear brand unlike any other. “Right now, everyone is still getting to know Elma,” she says. “In the next couple of weeks, it’ll become more clear what Elma is truly about.” Modest swimwear and a winter collection are on the horizon for the brand, and so are a “few cool projects”, according to Abu Deif. “Until then, we’re just excited to see how Elma will grow from here on out.”
Photo: Shahira Zaki. Courtesy of Elma
Read Next: From Bodysuits to Burkinis: The 21 Best Modest Swimsuits for the Summer

Miami Swim Week: Trends, New Brands and Highlights of the Shows

Miami Swim Week: Trends, New Brands and Highlights of the Shows

Miami Swim Week came to town in July. Highlights included SwimShow turning 40, Cabana’s attendance exceeding its 2019 numbers, Hammock relaunching under new ownership, Paraiso holding more than 25 runway presentations, and ProColombia getting behind 50-plus brands to participate in fashion shows. The word on the beach is that buyers are back. Here, they critique the week. (Editor’s note: The comments have been condensed and edited.)Divya Mathur, chief merchandising officer, Intermix
Trends: Microkinis, tankinis, shine, sheer, mesh, crystals, crochet (here to stay), cutouts, ruffles, bold color and prints, and matching sets.
New talents: Lily Franco, Palo Rosa, Ancora, Alix Pinho, Gigi C, Monica Hansen, My Beachy Side, Alma Arena, Bahama Mama and VDM.

Designers Maddy Marchesani, Dayna Mignone and Allanah Rosenwald pose backstage with models for VDM The Label Fashion Show during Paraiso Miami Beach at The Paraiso Tent.

Getty Images for VDM The Label

Impressions of the overall week and industry: There was incredible energy. It was well attended by countless brands, including a high number of emerging brands, and designers at various curated event spaces. With high interest and demand, it will be interesting to see how long the Florida and travel booms can last.

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Side notes: Collections are more curated and sexier with bold cutouts and micro bikinis. Brands are going after head-to-toe looks to wear day-to-night. Size inclusivity and sustainability remain key pillars.
Arielle Siboni, ready-to-wear fashion director, fashion office, Bloomingdale’s
Trends: This season was all about empowerment and feeling comfortable, most importantly, confident in your skin. “Look at me” shades including hot pink and lime green were fun pops of color and continued the celebratory spirit of high-shine fabrications and crystal trims. Lingerie-inspired separates, mesh panels and flirty cutouts were bold trends that will undoubtedly turn heads. Mermaid-inspired styles were one of the newest trends (and my personal favorite). Look to shell shapes and motifs, crochet in many forms, ombré and sea-like cerulean to drive this trend.
Favorite collections: Baobab, Bahía María, Capittana and Agua Bendita.
Impressions of the overall week and industry: After seasons away, there was a definite excitement to come together and showcase the latest in creative pursuits for the swimwear market. From casting to design details, inclusivity was top-of-mind.
The buying team led by Karen Klimkiewicz, general merchandise manager, Ron Jon
Trends: Texture solids still continue to be big, and we’re seeing ditsy florals for 2023. Next year’s colors like lime green, bright orange and browns are bold and polarizing.
Best collections: I was very impressed by the print offerings from missy/contemporary brands like Maxine and 24th and Ocean. For juniors, Kulani Kinis and Rhythm had the best prints for our customer.
New talents: Unfortunately, we were unable to find new brands. We found that the vendors we work with had the busiest booths. Most of the show’s new vendors are out of our price range. There was a surplus of beautiful printed caftan/cover-up vendors that were priced $200 and up.
Impressions of the overall week and industry: The show was just OK. We didn’t find the newness we were looking for, and most brands were just not in our price range. A big focus was finding vendors that offered juniors/contemporary with extended cup sizes — there’s a demand for them. I haven’t been able to find many price point vendors with great silhouettes and prints for younger customers.

Lori Marten, vice president and divisional merchandise manager, active, Nordstrom
Favorite trends: Three-dimensional textures and a new take on embossing, shine, mesh, eyelet, terry and seersucker. We were excited to see linen cover-ups with new color and shape fabrications that our customers will love.
Emerging trends: We saw the evolution of sexy, minimalist style emerge with an emphasis on cinching, ruching, twisting and knotting for a more elevated look.
Noteworthy collections: We’ve been watching Andrea Iyamah for two years and really love where she’s taking the label with a focus on details, color palette and new silhouettes. Ostra Brasil has beautiful strap details, wrapping techniques and interesting cutouts. Good American had strong silhouettes, textures, colors and cover-ups.
New talents: Maylé Vásquez’s versatile cover-ups stood out as timeless, elevated pieces that take you from poolside to a wedding. Cala de la Cruz has stunning print work. Devon Windsor’s swim and versatile rtw collections featured newness in fabrications, and cutouts and hardware that were subtly sexy.
Impressions of the overall week and industry: It’s exciting how brands are pushing the limits of swim and cover-ups as wardrobe foundations beyond styling solely for vacations. We appreciate how the industry continues to celebrate and elevate brands founded by diverse designers, and emphasizes the importance of size inclusivity.
Nicole Perry, senior buyer, Marissa Collections
Trends: Head-to-toe crochet, whether your bathing suit, sarong or handbag. Cutouts — the trend that never ends — what came back in the high designer world a few seasons ago is now prominent in our casual, everyday wear. Nautical — all your favorite yacht attire like wide-legged linen pants, cutout shirt dresses and swimsuits versatile enough to be worn as tops and bodysuits.
Favorite collections: Paolita, Temptation Positano, Azulu and Maygel Coronel.
New talents: S-Mode, an Argentinian line focusing on linen with beautiful nature-inspired prints.
Jodi Kahn, vice president, luxury fashion, Neiman Marcus
Trends: We’re noticing a shift from the minimalist trend that we saw in swim last year to more novelty pieces. Collections feature unique design details such as crochet textures and embellishments including ruffles, appliqué trims and jewelry hardware. We see an explosion of color with the return of neon pink, orange and blue hues, along with sophisticated, artistic painted florals.

Favorite collections: Lenny Niemeyer, Paolita, Alémais and Verandah all presented extraordinary collections.
New talents: Azulu, La Revêche and Me369.

A look from Azulu.

YELSSING ESPINOZA

Impressions of the overall week and industry: After coming off of a strong swim season, the energy was electrifying. We’re looking forward to continuing this momentum with resort.
Side notes: Swimwear continues to draw inspiration from sportswear designers by upping the sophistication factor. Swim tops and one-pieces that double as sportswear and bodysuits are becoming more prevalent, as well as chic ensemble cover-ups that effortlessly transition from beach to cocktails.
Jenni Johnson, senior director, fashion office, Macy’s
Colors: Hyper brights with a spotlight on pink, textured whites in eyelet, lace and crochet; black with black, aqua blues.
Key styles: The slipdress and matching sets (swimsuit and cover-up, matching top and shorts/pants/skirt).
Fabrications and details: Feminine details like 3D floral appliqué and ruffles. Summer shine such as sequins, lurex, paillettes and metallics. Terry cloth, textured and crinkled fabrics, crochet and openwork. Cutouts continue.
Teresa Azizian, owner, Pesca Boutique
Trends: Shimmer, textured/ribbed, and lots of blues, knits and appliqués. High-waisted bottoms shouldn’t be full coverage, so I’m happy how they’ve evolved.
Lacking items: Underwire in general, and one-pieces with underwire. Fun, cute prints and styles for larger cup sizes. We need more thong one-pieces like in the ‘80s and ‘90s. The ‘90s had a great high leg.
Favorite collections: Bohodot and Lily & Rose had beautiful detail, Lenny Niemeyer was stunning, and Pho Firenze for beachwear bikini dresses.
Impressions of the overall week and industry: As a buyer, it’s extremely inconvenient to run around to all the shows. It was truly draining. Buyers would place more orders if the show’s in one place. I found the most unique mix of lines at SwimShow.
Dayna Ziegler, senior vice president and general merchandise manager, women’s contemporary and modern rtw, Saks Fifth Avenue
Trends: Bright and bold colors, particularly green hues, as well as beautiful resortwear to complement swimwear. Cutouts and crochets also continue to be strong.

Best collections: Camilla, Andrea Iyamah and Shoshanna.
New talents: It was lovely meeting Carolina Lopez at Cabana as we just introduced Cala de la Cruz at Saks this spring.
Impressions of the overall week and industry: We loved swim week’s overall energy, and it was exhilarating to be back in Miami for the first time in a few years. We are coming off of a strong swim season, and it was great to see new offerings from so many of our brand partners. Saks pursued the category in a big way this spring with the introduction of more than 20 brands including Baobab, Veronica Beard, Good American and Agua Bendita.

Loro Piana Debuts Swimwear With ‘La Dolce Vita’ Collection

Loro Piana Debuts Swimwear With ‘La Dolce Vita’ Collection

GLAM BEACH: Loro Piana is debuting a resortwear collection that pays homage to “La Dolce Vita,” a moniker drawn from Federico Fellini’s namesake movie which epitomizes the quintessentially Italian indulgent lifestyle.The range of beach-ready options includes the first Loro Piana swimwear collection for women, which draws its colors from earthy and natural nuances including kummel, coral, ocean blue, emerald green and sandy beige.
Crafted from marine and aquatic jerseys, the former with a more decidedly sportswear bent, and the latter coming in bikini and swimsuit versions intended to be worn beyond water sports activities, both are embellished with charms shaped like a wave, life belt, boat and boat’s wheel.

The retail price for the one-piece swimsuit is 360 euros and the bikini goes for 390 euros.

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As part of the “La Dolce Vita” collection, the luxury brand under the LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton umbrella is also making a push on accessories, globally seen as strong drivers for luxury sales.
The range includes a new iteration of the brand’s signature White Sole slip-ons bearing the same marine-inspired charms of its swimwear with an 860 euro price tag, and a new summer-inflected handbag called Eolian Basket, which plays on the popular panier style.

Loro Piana’s Eolian Basket handbags part of “La Dolce Vita” collection.
Courtesy of Loro Piana

Crafted from handwoven regenerated organic cotton in a nod to Loro Piana’s knitwear expertise, the bag is enriched by brown calfskin handles woven, according to the macramé technique. A range of knots inspired by boats’ ropes reference the collection’s marine inflection. It is available in three sizes, including a mini, small and large version, the last two framed in calfskin and bearing additional shoulder handles. The bags retail between 900 euros and 2,200 euros.
The collection, which is complemented by other resortwear options in lightweight fabrics, including underpinnings, breezy shirts, roomy pants and technical anoraks, as well as accessories such as crochet cloche hats and striped flats, is available at the brand’s flagship stores and online.

From Bodysuits to Burkinis: The 21 Best Modest Swimsuits for the Summer

From Bodysuits to Burkinis: The 21 Best Modest Swimsuits for the Summer

Photo: Courtesy Hadia Ghaleb
It’s that time of the year again. As the mercury continues to rise, your calendar for the next few months is likely to include many more plans that focus on cooling off, be it with beach visits or dips in the pool. And while summer may translate to ‘bikini season’ for many, there’s something to be said about the appeal of a modest swimsuit. Offering the perfect amount of coverage, modest swimwear pieces come in a myriad of colors, patterns and cuts, ensuring that their wearer can enjoy the best of the summer without having to feel uncomfortable in their skin. As we gear up for our summer breaks, Vogue Arabia chalks out the best modest swimsuits available right now, from classic one-pieces to higher coverage numbers.

The best swimwear for light coverage this summer
Fancy a one-piece that allows ease of movement and also looks cool? Look no further than Cover Swim’s black turtleneck piece, or Summersault’s two-toned blue number, which features a high neck and thicker sleeves than basic cuts. Norma Kamali’s ruffled swimsuit is ideal for extra leg coverage, while Mary Katrantzou and La Double J’s playfully printed creations effortlessly cover the shoulders for especially hot days.
Light coverage: Norma Kamali, AED 923
The best bodysuits for medium coverage this summer
If you’re looking for a tad more coverage this summer, swimsuits with shorts-style bottoms are a must-have. Cases in point: Cynthia Rowley’s floral blue piece, which extends over the thighs, and Stockholm Surfboard’s all-black bodysuit, a versatile number you can keep coming back to. For complete arm coverage, Emilia Wickstead, Duskii and Mara Hoffman have some great picks, each in a print more exciting than the other.
Medium coverage: Cynthia Rowley, AED 873
The best burkinis for full coverage this summer
Hadi Ghaleb’s latest poolside line, featuring wraps and burkinis, is ideal for the woman who loves vibrant hues, but that’s not where the options end for modest swimwear. Look to Nike and Adidas for classic tunic and legging combinations in solid hues, or stir things up a bit with Lanuuk’s swim pieces, accentuated with feminine ruffle details. Lyra and Munamer add a modern twist to modest swimwear with exotic prints and zips, while Shelline’s pistachio green piece makes the perfect pick for the pastel lover.
Full coverage: Hadia Ghaleb, AED 699
Below, take a closer look at the best modest swimwear on Vogue Arabia’s list
Light coverage: Mary Katrantzou, AED 1,730
Light coverage: Cover Swim, AED 850
Light coverage: Ganni, AED 656
Light coverage: La Double J, AED 1,502
Light coverage: Summersault, AED 420
Medium coverage: Duskii, AED 588
Medium coverage: Stockholm Surfboard, AED 1,934
Medium coverage: Emilia Wickstead, AED 1,419
Medium coverage: Mara Hoffman, AED 895
Medium coverage: Balenciaga, AED 2,260
Medium coverage: Marysia, AED 1,379

Medium coverage: The Upside, AED 963
Full coverage: Shelline, AED 624
Full coverage: Lyra, AED 390
Full coverage: Nike, AED 500
Full coverage: Lanuuk, AED 414
Full coverage: Adidas, AED 550
Full coverage: Munamer, AED 652

Walmart Earnings Fall Short Thanks to Rising Gas and Food Prices

Walmart Earnings Fall Short Thanks to Rising Gas and Food Prices

Walmart is proving that even the nation’s largest retailer may not be immune to the economic pressures that are causing consumers to reevaluate their spending habits. 

Rising food prices meant more shoppers flocked to Walmart in the most recent quarter in search of grocery deals.
Courtesy Photo

The Bentonville, Ark.-based firm revealed quarterly earnings Tuesday before the market opened, improving on top-line revenues, but failing to meet Wall Street’s expectations after falling short on bottom-line profits. Company shares fell nearly 9 percent at the start of Tuesday’s trading session. 
“Bottom-line results were unexpected and reflected the unusual environment,” Doug McMillon, president and chief executive officer of Walmart, said in a statement. “U.S. inflation levels, particularly in food and fuel, created more pressure on the margin mix and operating costs than we expected. We’re adjusting and will balance the needs of our customers for value with the need to deliver profit growth for our future.”  

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For the most recent quarter, or the three-month period ending April 30, total revenues grew 2.4 percent to about $141 billion, up from more than $138 billion a year ago. Comp sales at Sam’s Club grew 10.2 percent, and 17.4 percent on a two-year stack. Membership income rose 10.5 percent. 
Walmart U.S. e-commerce sales increased 1 percent, or 38 percent on a two-year stack. Last August, McMillon said the company’s global e-commerce business was on track to reach $75 billion in revenues by the end of the year. The company still hasn’t said whether it has reached that goal yet.
Meanwhile, ​​net sales at Walmart International fell $3.5 billion during the most recent quarter, or 13 percent to $23.8 billion, negatively impacted by $5 billion, due to divestitures. The retailer logged $2.05 billion, down from $2.73 billion during last year’s first quarter, as a result. 
The results are a mixed bag. Walmart’s affordably priced food selection means consumers are increasingly flocking to the mass channel for their grocery needs. But McMillon added on Tuesday morning’s conference call with analysts that inflation is also lifting the average ticket price. Shoppers are responding by purchasing fewer discretionary items, resulting in smaller overall basket sizes. 
“As expected, consumers are increasingly drawn to the lower price points that Walmart can offer for groceries and Walmart is taking market share in food, but higher food sales is also putting pressure on gross margin,” Moody’s retail analyst Mickey Chadha wrote in a note. He added that the higher inventory levels “could lead to increased promotional cadence in the coming quarters if consumers continue to pull back, which could increase pressure on earnings. It is increasingly difficult to pass on higher prices to consumers while dealing with higher wages and employee costs.”
In terms of food costs, McMillon said there’s been double-digit inflation. “And I’m concerned that inflation may continue to increase. As it relates to Walmart U.S. general merchandise sales, we knew that we were up against stimulus dollars from last year, but the rate of inflation in food pulled more dollars away from [general merchandise] than we expected as customers needed to pay for the inflation in food,” he said.

Aside from rising consumer food and gasoline prices, executives on the call told analysts that additional headwinds came from higher-than-expected inventory levels (up 32 percent for the quarter, year-over-year), added fuel costs in the supply chain and increased labor expenses. 
“As the Omicron variant case count declined rapidly in the first half of the quarter, more of our associates [who] were out on COVID-19 leave came back to work faster than we expected,” McMillon said. “We hired more associates at the end of last year to cover for those on leave. So we ended up with weeks of overstaffing. That issue was resolved during the quarter, primarily through attrition.”
In addition, U.S. fuel cost the retailer more than $160 million more during the quarter than originally expected.

Doug McMillon, president and chief executive officer of Walmart
Courtesy Photo

Still, McMillon expressed optimism for the future. 
“Across our businesses, we had a strong top-line quarter,” he said. “There were some things that happened during the quarter that were different than we expected and we’re trying to be very transparent about those things. There seems to be more uncertainty now in a very fluid environment. And so, we’ll just deal with that.”
One way will be by slashing prices in high-margin areas, such as apparel, in an effort to manage excess inventory. While this might seem counterintuitive, McMillon said shoppers on a budget are more likely to notice. 
“Part of what’s at play here is [that] you’ve got food inflation moving up, but we’ve got general merchandise categories, like apparel and some of our hardlines categories, to play with,” he said. “And the beauty of it is [that] customers are even more price sensitive right now. They’re attention to fuel prices and high-food prices is high. And so when you bring [a price of] something down in sporting goods or hardware, one of these other categories, they notice even more than they would notice before and that makes the elasticity impact be different than it would be otherwise, which blends the mix up.” 
In addition, some tailwinds for the quarter included things like game consoles, as well as patio furniture, grills and gardening supplies, thanks to warming temperatures.

“In terms of the consumer themselves, we’ve seen strong growth with higher-income consumers, middle-income and lower-income, but we do see a definite strength with high-ticket items,” John Furner, president and CEO of Walmart U.S., said on the call. “With some consumers and others, we do see some switching, which would include switching specifically from brands to private brands. And where we see the switching from brands to private brands, we’ll continue to watch that for a group of customers, but we’ve got to all work harder to keep prices low for the American consumer.”
McMillon added: “It’s important to recognize that there’s more than one consumer. We serve the whole country. [With] the U.S. in particular, we’ve got a breadth of customers and they behave differently. [With] some customers, we are seeing some indications of change throughout the quarter, but that’s not true for all of them.”

Pieces from Walmart’s Love & Sports brand.
Courtesy Photo

Walmart has worked hard over the last few years to expand its assortment of merchandise, particularly in fashion. The big-box retailer now sells more than 1,000 third-party apparel, accessories, and beauty and wellness brands — such as Levi’s, Reebok, Free People, Jordache, Eloquii, Space NK and Kris Jenner’s home cleaning brand Safely — and continues to add to the scale and breadth of its portfolio of brands each quarter. Earlier this month, the firm expanded its distribution of period-panty brand Proof to approximately 4,000 Walmart stores.
In addition, Walmart has an extensive list of its own apparel brands, three of which are worth more than $2 billion, although the company declined to say which ones. The list includes sustainable innerwear and maternity brand Kindly, swimwear and activewear brand Love & Sports, and apparel brands Free Assembly and Scoop, of which luxury designer Brandon Maxwell serves as creative director.
“Maintaining price competitiveness is the key risk for Walmart in today’s inflationary environment,” Landon Luxembourg, senior analyst at research firm Third Bridge, wrote in a note. “As consumer wallets come under pressure, private brands will likely take the stage as consumers trade down from a pure decision of opting for lower-cost items. Walmart’s private brand portfolio, which was a focus area over the last four to five years, has now doubled its assortment. However, it has not grown consumer mind share and lack recognizability versus Target and Costco’s competing private assortment, which may be more sought after by consumers.”

Walmart anticipates current quarter revenues will increase more than 5 percent, excluding divestitures. U.S. comp sales are also expected to grow — between 4 percent and 5 percent — excluding fuel, while earnings per share are expected to be flat to up slightly, excluding divestitures.  
For the full year, the company expects net revenues will rise about 4 percent, excluding divestitures. Walmart U.S. comp sales are expected to increase roughly 3.5 percent, excluding fuel, while earnings per share for the year will decrease about 1 percent, excluding divestitures.
The company ended the quarter with $11.8 million in cash and cash equivalents and more than $32 million in long-term debt. 
Shares of Walmart, which closed up 0.11 percent Monday to $148.21, are up 6.7 percent, year-over-year.
“We don’t expect this miss to become a norm, seeing that Walmart has historically outperformed competition during tough economic times,” Arun Sundaram, senior equity analyst at CFRA Research, wrote in a note. His firm maintained its “buy” position on Walmart’s stock, but cut the 12-year price target by $3 to $162 a share. “The good news is most of these issues seem to be isolated to the quarter and margins should improve in the second quarter and the back half of the year as Walmart works through excess inventory and better matches pricing with costs.”

Fashion and Art Meet for Luxury Swimwear Collaboration

Fashion and Art Meet for Luxury Swimwear Collaboration

French luxury swimwear brand Vilebrequin and contemporary art Swiss publishing house JRP Editions are pooling their resources for a museum-ready swimwear collection. 

Pieces from the Vilebrequin x JRP Editions collection by artist Kenny Scharf.
Courtesy Photo

“Bringing art to the beach has always been the dream,” said Roland Herlory, chief executive officer of Vilebrequin, which is part of the G-III Apparel Group. “This long-term collaboration with JRP Editions will push our artistry to new places over the coming seasons.”
That includes the original Saint-Tropez trunk, men’s and women’s swimsuits, tops and accessories, like bags, hats, beach towels and even custom-print ping-pong sets. There are 25 pieces in total, that come in various hues such as purple hot rod flames, rainbow-color happy faces, sea turtles, graffiti-like splashes of paint and shades of sky blue, while exploring such themes and topics as elitism, feminism, fetishized luxury, randomness, gender-identity and artists of color.  

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Pieces from the Vilebrequin x JRP Editions collection by artist John Armleder.
Courtesy Photo

“Our swimsuit fabrics are an entirely new terrain for artists,” Herlory explained. “We do not consider what we do art; we’re more focused on reproducing artists’ work as closely as possible to the original in the most honest and respectful manner. With the know-how of Vilebrequin studio and ateliers, we are capable of delivering printing techniques that reproduce an original artwork’s unique color and contrast as faithfully as possible.” 
John Armleder, one of the artists featured in the collaboration, added: “There is no essential difference between a painting, a print or a swimsuit. What changes fundamentally here is the context and the distribution modes of the object. The forms and compositions can thus migrate freely from one support to the other.”

Pieces from the Vilebrequin x JRP Editions collection by artist John Armleder.
Courtesy Photo

Additional artists include Kenny Scharf, Sylvie Fleury, and Racquel Chevremont and Mickalene Thomas, also known professionally as “Deux Femmes Noires.” The collaboration was curated in partnership with JRP Editions founder Lionel Bovier, who also serves as director of MAMCO, a contemporary art museum in Geneva, and Arnaud Hubert, chief executive officer of JRP Editions. 
“We wanted to curate a collection that would allow us to explore as many voices and designs as possible,” Bovier said. “This meant bringing together artists with radically different approaches, but who share an interest in how their work can migrate from the canvas or walls to textile. They are united by a common thread: the power of their work, the clarity of their artistic language and the integrity with which Vilebrequin handled their projects.”

Pieces from the Vilebrequin x JRP Editions collection by artist Kenny Scharf.
Courtesy Photo

The limited-edition collection launched May 3, just in time for warm weather and summer travels, on vilebrequin.com and JRP-editions.com, as well as select global Vilebrequin stores. The collection, though now out as the world reopens, was actually conceptualized during the pandemic when people were still just dreaming of far-flung getaways. A second drop, the “Faces in Places” print by artist Kenny Scharf will come out June 21, followed by a second capsule later this year and a third in early 2023. Sizes range from XS to 3XL in men’s and XS to XL in women’s, with prices ranging from $105 to $315.

Vilebrequin was founded by Fred Prysquel in Saint-Tropez in 1971 as a men’s swimwear business. In 2012, G-lll Apparel Group purchased the brand. The following year, women’s swimwear was added to the mix.

Calzedonia Ups Sustainability Efforts, Starting With WWF Beach Clean-up Project

Calzedonia Ups Sustainability Efforts, Starting With WWF Beach Clean-up Project

MILAN — Calzedonia is pressing on with its sustainable mission, laying down a number of eco-friendly initiatives.The company has renewed its partnership with the World Wide Fund for Nature, or WWF, engaging in beach clean-up initiatives that kicked off last week with a company-wide session on Venice’s Lido.
“Over 300 employees took part in the cleaning session, removing plastics and microplastics from the beaches. However, in addition to the project’s positive impact on the environment, it also had an educational bent, raising awareness among our employees,” said Marcello Veronesi, Calzedonia’s brand leader and the son of parent company Calzedonia Group founder and chairman Sandro Veronesi.

The 2022 goal is to clean up around 32 million square feet throughout Italy by engaging employees and citizens in one or more of the 100 clean-up days the WWF organizes annually. Last year, Calzedonia helped the WWF clean up 120 Italian beaches, or 70 million square feet, more than doubling the original goal.

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The executive underscored the positive impact such a move has had on customers and citizens, too, raising awareness on the pressing topic of climate change and environmental pollution.

Calzedonia and WWF beach clean-up initiative on Venice’s Lido beaches.
Courtesy of Calzedonia

A dedicated page on the WWF website allows anyone to apply and become a one-day volunteer during one of the clean-up days. Volunteers will be provided with gloves, a recycled cotton canvas bag and T-shirt bearing both entities’ logos. As a reward, Calzedonia will also offer a discount voucher.
Calzedonia customers will also be requested to support the WWF in monitoring and reporting on the state of the beaches’ pollution as part of a project called “Citizen Science.”
Since 2020, parent company Calzedonia Group has been issuing a sustainability report anticipating an Italian law that currently only requests public companies to do so. “Although the group is not listed, I believe we represent a significant contribution to Italy’s economic backbone and it was our duty to be transparent,” Veronesi offered.
Last year, the group managed to source 60 percent of its energy from renewable sources, avoiding 30,000 tons of carbon dioxide emissions. It also transitioned its use of regular paper and packaging to FSC-approved alternatives and pledged to plant 2 million trees to offset its footprint.

Marcello Veronesi, brand leader at Calzedonia.
Courtesy of Calzedonia

In 2019 the group joined the Fashion Pact and Veronesi said the group aims to meet higher sustainability standards by 2025 and become carbon neutral in the near future.
“Sustainability is an ongoing journey, it’s important to always be in tune with the times and ahead of them,” Veronesi noted.
To this end, the beachwear brand is testing the recycled waters, debuting this year two initiatives focused on swimwear and hosiery. Veronesi noted that the integrated supply chain, whereby 80 percent of manufacturing is carried out in-house is a great advantage and a step closer to achieving traceability credentials.
Starting May 13, all Calzedonia stores in Italy and a handful on international flagships in France, Germany, Spain, Portugal and Poland will start collecting worn-in swimsuits from all brands, 50 percent of which the label expects to be able to turn into recycled yarns. The beachwear specialist has teamed up with Artus, a sustainable solution provider offering its facilities and services to companies aiming to implement circular fashion projects.

Eco-friendly swimwear currently represents 24 percent of the brand’s offering, but Veronesi said his aim is to grow that quota to 31 percent by the end of the year.

Swimwear from Calzedonia spring 2022 collection.
Courtesy of Calzedonia

Come fall, the brand, which produces and sells around 70 million stockings yearly, will start a recycling pilot initiative on this front. Veronesi acknowledged the challenges in breathing new life in hosiery due to its mixed composition, which includes nylon, polyamide, elastane and more, but he anticipated that the brand will secure machinery that will bring recycling to an industrial scale.

Hadia Ghaleb Launches a Modest Swimwear Line: “I Want To Highlight the Diversity and Beauty of Arab Women”

Hadia Ghaleb Launches a Modest Swimwear Line: “I Want To Highlight the Diversity and Beauty of Arab Women”

Photo: Courtesy of Hadia Ghaleb Brand

Dubai-based entrepreneur and fashion influencer Hadia Ghaleb is launching an inclusive swimwear line this week, Hadia Ghaleb Label. In an effort to bridge the gap between veiled and unveiled women through fashion, Ghaleb’s latest venture offers a collection of swimwear that can work for women of all backgrounds. Bringing together women of all cultures, religions, and lifestyles, the swimwear line practices inclusivity—something that is being called for within the fashion industry. “With the launch of Hadia Ghaleb Label, I hope to end the division of the swimwear market for veiled and unveiled women. The idea that we have separate stores feels outdated — in 2022, we need to embrace the uniqueness of each woman and ensure equal fashion choices for all,” she tells Vogue Arabia. 
Photo: Courtesy of Hadia Ghaleb Label
Drawing inspiration from vibrant summer colors in combination with the elegance Arab women are known for, Hadia Ghaleb Label gives women a chance to express themselves as fashionably as possible without worrying about their backgrounds during vacations. The label includes two swimwear sets that come in six different colors, alluding to the sea, sunsets, and beach. An extra dose of creativity comes in via the fact that Ghaleb’s pieces can be styled in several different ways and combinations, allowing the wearer to customize their look: Swimwear Ensemble, including a swimsuit top and scarf; and Swimwear Full Set, including swimsuit top, scarf, leggings, and sarong. The launch of the line will take place between May 3-6 with the digital presentation including prominent fashion influencers in the Middle East, including Hadia Ghaleb herself, Yusur Al-Khalidi, Maryam Al-Khalidi, Youmi, and Shouq.

Photo: Courtesy of Hadia Ghaleb Label
Ghaleb stresses on the need to reclaim the burkini trend and the negative connotations surrounding it. “The swimwear category for veiled women, also known as the burkini, often focuses only on practical functionality and doesn’t provide stylish or trendy solutions for the women who wear it,” she explains. The story of this launch is also a personal one for Ghaleb, who has witnessed the ostracization of her fellow veiled women. “Growing up, I saw a stigma around the burkini: Once, a friend of mine was denied entry into a place because she was wearing a burkini. I stood there helpless, feeling her pain but unable to change the situation. Hadia Ghaleb Label’s purpose is to change that perception, and designs of conservative swimwear, so no other woman will have to go through moments like this.”
Photo: Courtesy of Hadia Ghaleb Label
Though not always a conservative dresser herself, Ghaleb believes in her message of changing the stigma around veiled women’s fashion.  “The mission of Hadia Ghaleb Label is to uplift and empower women, no matter what their fashion or lifestyle choices are. By creating this swimwear line, I want to highlight the diversity and elegant beauty of Arab women by coming up with designs that will fit — and complement — all women.”
Photo: Courtesy of Hadia Ghaleb Label

Frankies Bikinis Adds Activewear to the Assortment

Frankies Bikinis Adds Activewear to the Assortment

Frankies Bikinis is the latest brand getting into the activewear games.The fast-growing Los Angeles-based swimwear business — which has expanded into footwear, men’s swim separates, beauty, cell phone cases and ready-to-wear apparel, in addition to collaborations with names like Alo Yoga, actress Hailee Steinfeld and tennis star Naomi Osaka in the past year — is launching its first activewear collection Tuesday. 

Pieces from Frankies Bikinis’ new activewear collection.
Courtesy Photo

“Activewear is something that I felt was an organic next step for myself as a designer and also for the brand and our customers,” Frankies Bikinis founder and creative director Francesca Aiello, told WWD. “Over the past year, Frankies Bikinis has been expanding into new categories and the purpose behind this has been to offer my customers more options that they can incorporate into their everyday lives both on and off the beach.”

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The 12-piece collection, which ranges in price from $65 to $145 each, includes leggings, bralettes, crop tops, tennis skirts and dresses, bodysuits and gym bags. The collection comes in sizes XS to XL and can be purchased at frankiesbikinis.com, as well as third-party retailers, such as Revolve, Free People and Victoria’s Secret, among others.  

Frankies Bikinis’ new activewear can be worn both in the gym and out.
Courtesy Photo

Aiello said the assortment mixes fashion with technical attributes — such as moisture-wicking and quick-dry fabrics — and can therefore be worn throughout the day. There are also tennis skirts with built-in shorts for extra support and pieces made from 80-percent recycled polyester. 

Looks from the Frankies Bikinis activewear collection.
Courtesy Photo

“Our customer is typically on the go and wants pieces, whether swim or other [pieces], that can be worn for your morning walk to your lunch date with your girlfriends — and this collection brings exactly that,” Aiello explained. “Our line has the amazing technical qualities of your go-to activewear piece, but the versatility to wear for any occasion due to the high focus we placed on making it so heavily fashion-focused. 
“With each of the categories we expand into, my goal is for them to continue to grow with the brand each season,” the designer continued. “I have had so much fun really making Frankies Bikinis Active unique and true to our signature style and have so much more up my sleeve.” 

Frankies Bikinis is launching activewear.
Courtesy Photo

Aiello founded Frankies Bikinis in 2012 out of high school, quickly growing its fanbase and working with names like streetwear brand Kith and model Sofia Richie along the way. 
Frankies’ total revenues grew 70 percent at a compound annual growth rate, over the last five years, the founder said. The brand’s most recent holiday collection — a mix of swimwear and apparel —  had a 75-percent holiday sell-through rate within the first hour of launch. And there are more categories — and the possibility of Frankies Bikinis’ own stores — on the horizon. 

Leggings and a crop top from Frankies Bikinis new activewear.
Courtesy Photo

“I have been loving being able to expand Frankies Bikinis into new categories alongside swimwear,” Aiello said. “The goal is to continue to offer my customers more categories that they can incorporate into their everyday lifestyles, but never stray from the brand’s core. Everything that we offer — whether that is our clean beauty, swimwear, footwear — is something that I use or wear every day; just with my personal Frankies’ style twist. So any continued category expansion for the brand will be not only organic and true to myself and the brand, but also something that my customers would love and use [and] wear regularly.

“And brick-and-mortar is something that I think would be so amazing for us to open one day,” she continued. “As we continue to expand our offerings, something like a store of our own is becoming more exciting to think about. With that said, I really believe in taking my time to perfect everything that the brand does and releases so am not rushing into anything and enjoying the growth process.”

Pieces from Frankies Bikinis’ new activewear collection.
Courtesy Photo

10 Sustainable and Size Inclusive Swimsuits to Feel Good in This Summer

10 Sustainable and Size Inclusive Swimsuits to Feel Good in This Summer

The urge to have a much-needed beach holiday — whether in a far-flung destination or closer to home — is stronger than ever. One way to look, feel, and do good during it? Wearing sustainable swimwear that flatters your body. With size inclusivity and sustainability being major themes this year, buying the right swimsuit that has been sourced and produced ethically is a must.
Brands have been recycling post-consumer waste like fishing nets and plastic bottles and turning them into Econyl, a new material that’s being used in swimwear. As for the size, options have increased with pieces ranging from monochrome, to fun prints, and cut out designs. There are plenty of choices to mix and match as well (such as the bikini bottom from Mara Hoffman), and pieces that would add a pop of color to your summer wardrobe (Evarae). If modesty is what you prefer while still keeping up with the trends, the bodysuits from Chromat, Azyä and the swim headscarf from Adidas would be the right pick.
Being comfortable and feeling confident in what you wear is key. Scroll through for our edit of sustainable swimwear for all shapes and sizes.
Read Next: 6 K-Beauty Pros on How to Get Gorgeous Summer Skin

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