sustainable

Burberry Becomes the First Luxury Fashion Brand to Receive SBTi Approval for Net-Zero Emissions Goal

Burberry Becomes the First Luxury Fashion Brand to Receive SBTi Approval for Net-Zero Emissions Goal

Photo: Darrel Hunter
Burberry is the first luxury fashion company to receive approval for its net-zero emissions target by the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi).

The SBTi is considered the gold standard for companies setting goals to reduce their emissions and develop targets in line with the Paris Agreement’s 1.5 C pathway. It was developed in partnership between CDP, the United Nations Global Compact, World Resources Institute (WRI), and the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF).
“Burberry’s net-zero targets match the urgency of the climate crisis and set a clear example that their peers must follow,” said SBTi CEO Luiz Amaral in a statement. “Climate science tells us that we need rapid and deep emissions cuts if we are to achieve global net-zero and prevent the most damaging effects of climate change.”
Experts say it’s critical that companies follow up on their targets and invest in technologies and research to reduce emissions. Burberry has a number of commitments to reduce scope 1, 2, and 3 emissions to uphold its net-zero emissions goal. That includes a 95% reduction in scope 1 and 2 emissions (generated from Burberry’s own operations) by 2023 compared to 2017, maintaining this reduced level through to 2040. On scope 3 emissions, those generated at supply chain level, the biggest portion of fashion’s carbon footprint and the most challenging to tackle, Burberry has committed to reducing by 46.2% compared to 2019 and by 90% from 2019 to 2040.
Burberry was one of the first luxury companies to join the SBTi in 2019. Other signatories include Kering, Richemont, Prada, and LVMH. While other companies such as Chanel and Hermès have received approval from SBTi for their emission reduction goals, Burberry’s targets for net-zero emissions are a first in the industry. The British luxury brand is currently carbon-neutral across all global operations, and in June 2021, it set the target to become climate positive by 2040.
“Rooting our commitments in science has always been a priority at Burberry, so we can ensure the steps we are taking will have the necessary impact and bring about lasting change,” said Burberry VP of corporate responsibility, Caroline Laurie. “We continue to challenge ourselves to drive measurement, improvement, and transparency across our operations, and we are committed to continue working with our suppliers and partners to accelerate the adoption of more sustainable practices. We hope this encourages others to do the same.”
Originally published in Voguebusiness.com
Read next: The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee is Being Celebrated with These Nature-Inspired Activations By Burberry

20 Conscious Buys to Kickstart a More Mindful 2022

20 Conscious Buys to Kickstart a More Mindful 2022

The world’s growing interest in sustainability is encouraging brands to re-evaluate their consumption habits and redirect their efforts towards becoming more ‘positively conscious.’ Luxury fashion heavyweights, including Gucci and Stella McCartney, as well as on-the-rise labels and regional brands, are spotlighting sustainability in order to motivate consumers and the fashion industry to follow suit.  As consumers in 2022, it is our duty to create a positive social impact through our choices, and thankfully we have the ability to do so too. Living sustainably has become a covetable lifestyle choice—and what better way to start practicing good habits than by investing in brands that echo a more mindful approach?
Not sure where to start? How about with a longtime favorite courtesy of Gucci? Treat yourself to a GG petite textured leather and print coated canvas wallet this season – an everyday classic. Well known for her ethical approach, Stella McCartney has also made green production her brand ethos: ‘responsible, honest, and modern’ – and that’s exactly what we get from her products, especially her Falabella medium vegetarian leather tote.
If a new bag tops your 2022 wishlist, consider Chloé’s woody recycled felt tote bag, or a new mushroom leather ‘Victoria’ travel bag by Hermès. Extend the ‘go green’ mentality to accessories too with Loren Stewart’s gold vermeil necklace or Laura Lombardi’s Elena bracelet. And what about footwear? Loefler Randall’s gold sienna tall boots are just what you need to beat those January blues. Feeling shady? Consider the DMY By DMY Valentina transparent brown sunglasses.
As you continue to update your wardrobe with eco-friendly finds, fill your closet with the best of the best. Think printed silk twill kaftans from Emilio Pucci, a JW Anderson multi-panel dress, a Rag & Bone zip sweater, or Marques Almeida’s asymmetric tie-dye T-shirt. There’s no going wrong with Marine Serre’s printed denim miniskirt or some E.L.V jeans. Finally, if want to sleep sustainably, Skin is the brand for you – consider the Christina PJ set for something simple, or if you want to spice things up with prints, look to Desmond and Dempsey. Above, Vogue Arabia has devised a list of the best conscious buys to jump start your year the right way…
Read Next: Vogue’s Ultimate 10 Step Guide to a New Year Wardrobe Clear-Out

8 Craftwork-Inspired High Fashion Pieces to Buy Now

8 Craftwork-Inspired High Fashion Pieces to Buy Now

Photo: Courtesy of Hazar Jawabra
Fashion’s sustainability focus is putting artisanal eclecticism and craftwork front, right and center. For FW21, Gabriela Hearst offered some seriously chic propositions for both her namesake line and her first collection for Chloé, embracing a circular approach while staying true to her signature earthy puritanism and superior tailoring. Think elegant off-white ponchos and striped knit maxi dresses. Artfully disheveled wool–complete with loose strands and fringing–showed up at Acne and Salvatore Ferragamo, while Jonathan Anderson added a cartoonish twist to bold block suede color suiting with oversized ‘straw’ tassels. And it’s not just fashion week regulars who are tapping the trend.
Photo: Courtesy of Chloé
Kaleidoscopic, otherworldly, and unrestrained, the work of young Palestinian designer Hazar Jawabra embraces traditional techniques passed down from generation to generation. “The art of knitting and embroidery is a major part of my Palestinian identity,” she says. “Each household has a special pattern in a specific color, unique to it and the lady of the house… I’ve learned from these creative women and filled my collection with Palestinian history and art while adding my own personal touch.” The result is gender-defying “wearable pieces of art” that reflect the history of a region rich in artisanal crafts. “Every design involves a unique process,” she says, including free sampling, 2D and 3D design on the body. “My collection tells the story I aim to present: it’s colorful, radical, joyful, funny and hard–all the contradictory characteristics and accumulated feelings that have built my existential experience.”
Photo: Courtesy of Hazar Jawabra
Admittedly, heavy knits might not be the first thing you reach for when contemplating what to wear in sun-soaked climes, but chunky layers aren’t the only way to embrace modern eclecticism. Scroll through to shop our pick of craftwork-inspired fashion buys…
Twisted triangle hoop earrings
Buy NowFringed striped cashmere-blend turtleneck poncho
Buy NowResin round Sabre choker in Dark Horn
Buy NowSwing raffia in camel/black
Buy NowKnitted jacquard coat with fringe
AED:10,062Buy NowTie-dye draped jersey dress
Buy NowBrew cotton-crochet bucket hat
Buy Now
Read Next: Bella Hadid’s Most Championed Sustainable Brands

10 Sustainable and Size Inclusive Swimsuits to Feel Good in This Summer

10 Sustainable and Size Inclusive Swimsuits to Feel Good in This Summer

The urge to have a much-needed beach holiday — whether in a far-flung destination or closer to home — is stronger than ever. One way to look, feel, and do good during it? Wearing sustainable swimwear that flatters your body. With size inclusivity and sustainability being major themes this year, buying the right swimsuit that has been sourced and produced ethically is a must.
Brands have been recycling post-consumer waste like fishing nets and plastic bottles and turning them into Econyl, a new material that’s being used in swimwear. As for the size, options have increased with pieces ranging from monochrome, to fun prints, and cut out designs. There are plenty of choices to mix and match as well (such as the bikini bottom from Mara Hoffman), and pieces that would add a pop of color to your summer wardrobe (Evarae). If modesty is what you prefer while still keeping up with the trends, the bodysuits from Chromat, Azyä and the swim headscarf from Adidas would be the right pick.
Being comfortable and feeling confident in what you wear is key. Scroll through for our edit of sustainable swimwear for all shapes and sizes.
Read Next: 6 K-Beauty Pros on How to Get Gorgeous Summer Skin

The Emerging and Sustainable Saudi Designers to Have on Your Radar

The Emerging and Sustainable Saudi Designers to Have on Your Radar

Focused on human experience and sustainable innovation, a cohort of designers is affirming the strength of Saudi Arabia to grow into a leading power of great design.
From left: UNASTokyo founder Yazeed, designer Hadeel Alhussain, Saudi model Alanoud Osamah, accessories designer Dania Shinkar, and makeup artist Nourah Osamah. Photographed by Naif Alquba
The scene is set: stylist Jawaher Aldokeel rushes in for final adjustments, pinning into place the lapel of RealSelf founder, Nouf Alhazmi. Makeup artist Nourah Osamah reaches forward, strategically placing her powder brush on the cheek of designer Dania Shinkar.
With the camera in position, photographer Naif Alquba, bright-eyed, tells Aldokeel, “Yes, stay there, it looks amazing!” and flashes fill the studio with a rush of electric light. As the cast is arranged into their final positions, designer Hadeel AlHussain perfects her eponymous brand’s meticulously cut ivory overcoat, worn with an unexpected androgynous edge by model AlAnoud Osamah – an embodiment of the merging of tastes, energies, and ideas on set. As the shoot comes to a close, the talents and team furl around the screen presenting the shoot’s hero images. The air is filled with affirming repetitions of “Marra helo!” The cast and crew smile with excitement – and relief.
Saudi model Alanoud Osamah with designer Hadeel AlHussain. Photographed by Naif Alquba
The most inspired designers reclaim the notion of what a designer is defined to be. Existing at the interface of ideas, feelings, and knowledge, in a world that demands of us to be engaged, emerging designers in Saudi Arabia celebrate longevity, sustainability, and intercultural experience. What had felt like a rush to create and exist some years ago by emerging talents in the region, now enjoys a considered pace. Designers are finding deeper value in creating with a clarity of their brands’ market value, as well as their role in building the Kingdom’s fashion industry, buoyed by initiatives like Made in Saudi, spearheaded by the Ministry of Culture.
Shinkar, founder of her namesake accessories brand, considered entering the ready-to-wear market after completing her education at the London College of Fashion. However, upon recognizing the absence of a Saudi brand specializing in bags, she pursued it further, describing the experience as her calling and her brand mission – to design “ethically crafted, eco-friendly products, adopting an explorative and experimental design approach,” she says. “It’s my responsibility to be kind to our planet and to promote mindful consumerism. There’s no point in creating something that already exists.”
Dania Shinkar. Photographed by Naif Alquba
Emerging from a visual arts background, AlHussein pursued a more technical education in the engineering of fashion, which is ever present in the framework of her pieces. Inspired by the body’s silhouette, her design process begins with AlHussein “working with her hands,” drawing and sculpting textiles and materials, forming a narrative for each collective centered around the human experience and her ideas of femininity. Aesthetically, her approach to design sees her merge the sophistication of the Middle East with Danish minimalism, where she undertook much of her fashion education. Having grown up in Beirut, AlHussein found a great fascination for “the fashion scene, the glamour, and the amazing couture” and aspired to add that to the market in Saudi Arabia, diversifying the region’s offering. In merging these touchpoints, AlHussein’s collections are formulated with a consistent design language, “leaving the shapes and details to speak for themselves,” she posits.
When examining the work of such designers, what grants their objects strength is their consistency in form, narrative, and intention. This comes from a set sense of values and missions driving a desire to create. It is this sense of understanding that offers brands a stronghold, and what also invites the consumer to build a conscious relationship with the brand. Having lived in Tokyo for more than six years, Yazeed, founder of UNASTokyo, recalls how every aspect of the city was designed with purpose, consideration, and relevance to the environment. He launched his brand in Japan, with these informal schools of thinking directing his approach to design. The slow fashion brand produces “timeless” collections of up to four pieces, manufactured in Japan. It fuses the design aesthetics and sensibilities native to Tokyo with the innate cultural aesthetics that stem from being Saudi. It enters the Saudi market with a pop-up presentation at Personage Concept store this month. The necessity of unique perspectives and products driven by narrative and values is a clear factor in the legitimacy, longevity, and impact of a brand, especially in the context of an emerging and rapidly expanding fashion industry, as is the case for Saudi Arabia.
RealSelf founder Nouf AlHazmi. Photographed by Naif Alquba
In fulfilling their respective goals to create sustainably informed Saudi brands, each designer faces their respective challenges in finding new solutions. These challenges range from advancing supply chains for developing and applying upcycled materials, to educating regional audiences and clients about the importance of engaging in mindful fashion consumerism. A consistent hurdle is the difficulty in finding suitable locations to stock and present their collections regionally, given the importance of their product story.
Alhazmi speaks with conviction on the subject, sharing how even in the context of a streetwear brand, “material choices and clear messaging are what lead a collection.” A designer engaging with the rapid process of streetwear fashion, constant drops, and generating new pieces every few weeks, she has found that simplicity and consistency in details are what help her maintain a sense of identity. RealSelf is now stocked across the Middle East, including Personage in Riyadh and the Uncommon Flagship store in Kuwait City. Her consideration for good design being synonymous with sustainability and accessibility, she, along Shinkar, Yazeed, and AlHussain add value and global relevance to the Saudi fashion industry. This loud and clear declaration of conscious design engages craftsmen and makers but also consumers who are invited to experience fashion from a more sustainable approach.
Read Next: Meet the Saudi Artists Raising the Bar of High Art in the Kingdom
Originally published in the June 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia
Style: Jawaher AldokeelCreative direction: K DasoarMakeup: Nourah OsamahProduction: The Playground KSAStyle assistant: Nouf MalawiProduction coordinator: Wiam AbdulJabbarModel: Alanoud Osamah

Everything You Need to Know About Buying Vegan Fashion

Everything You Need to Know About Buying Vegan Fashion

From researching the latest plant-based materials on the market to ensuring that the entire manufacturing process is actually eco-friendly, here are five things to look out for when shopping for vegan clothes.
Natalia Vodianova wearing Stella McCartney KOBA® Fur Free Fur. Courtesy of Stella McCartney

Given our increasing environmental and ethical concerns, it’s no wonder that Veganuary — a challenge to go vegan for the whole of January — is becoming increasingly popular. And while much of the focus is on food, there are plenty of other ways to live free of animal products, particularly when it comes to the contents of our wardrobes.
In fact, vegan fashion is something of a growing movement. Last April, Lyst reported that searches for ‘vegan leather’ had increased 69% year-on-year, while retail intelligence platform Edited suggested the pandemic could be behind an increased drive towards vegan items. (According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 60% of all human pathogens and 75% of new or emerging infectious diseases originate from animals.)
“More and more consumers are seeking out both ethical and sustainable fashion options — and vegan is often the benchmark for both,” Annick Ireland, CEO and founder of online boutique Immaculate Vegan, tells Vogue. “Just as we’ve seen a real revolution in how people eat over the past few years, with huge growth in the plant-based food sector, we’re now seeing the same in vegan fashion.”
For those curious about what vegan fashion actually is and how to go about buying it, here’s everything you need to know.
1. Learn about vegan and non-vegan fabrics
Put simply, a vegan wardrobe is one that doesn’t include any silk, leather, wool, cashmere, feathers or fur. If the clothes feature any kind of animal byproduct, they’re not vegan. Make sure you keep an eye out for the details and trimmings. For example, Nudie Jeans are now vegan because the back patches are no longer real leather, but that might not be the case for other brands. Look for the Peta-approved vegan logo to ensure that any products you’re buying really are animal-free.

2. Make sure ‘vegan’ means sustainable
Avoiding animal products won’t automatically make your wardrobe better for the environment, though. Many products labelled vegan are made from fossil-fuel derived synthetics, which are difficult to break down and can harm our oceans.
“A lot of consumers see it as a daunting transition, from understanding the myriad materials that exist to making sure that the vegan alternative you’re buying is also sustainable,” says Ioanna Topouzoglou, founder of London-based vegan handbag brand Mashu. “It can be a lot to digest and navigate.” She suggests turning to directories such as Good on You, CoGo, and Mochni, which include sustainable vegan listings from various brands.
Seek transparency about the manufacturing processes. After all, if you’re going vegan, you probably care about more general ethical credentials, too. “Look at the fabrics, check where they’re made and dig a little deeper to find out about their sustainable supply chains.  Fortunately, many sites list this along with the product details,” says stylist Rebekah Roy, director of London’s first vegan fashion show Bare Fashion.
Courtesy of Pangaia

3. Research vegan-friendly alternative materials
A dress made out of seaweed, anyone? Becoming au fait with vegan fashion means digging into the science of textiles, from soybean cashmere to leather made from corn. Even linings such as goose or duck feathers in puffer jackets can be replaced with down made from flowers, as demonstrated recently by Pangaia.
Mariam Al Sibai FW20 made with Piñatex. Photo: Instagram/@mariamalsibai

One of the biggest challenges when shopping vegan is finding an eco-friendly alternative to leather, as much of the vegan leather currently out there is made from un-environmentally friendly virgin PVC (ie. plastic). Cult brand Nanushka is starting to use post-consumer and recycled polyester for its luxe vegan leather, but if you want to go entirely non-synthetic, there are plenty of options from the natural world as well. For her eponymous brand, Syrian-British designer Mariam Al Sibai works with innovative fabrics  with the most exciting being the Piñatex fabric (made from pineapple leaves) as a sustainable alternative to leather.
“One of the great things about vegan fashion is how many amazing innovative materials there are that are not only cruelty-free but also really sustainable and often made using waste products,” Ireland says. “For example, there’s Piñatex and apple leather (made from apple cores and leftover skin from apple harvests) — they provide an additional source of income for fruit farmers. There’s also cactus leather, which is high quality and uses very little water to grow.”
Oh, and if you’re looking for faux fur, which again is typically made from synthetics, check out the offerings from Maison Atia and House of Fluff, as well as Stella McCartney’s recently developed KOBA Fur-Free Fur — made from a mix of recycled polyester and plant products.
Stella McCartney KOBA® Fur Free Fur. Courtesy of Stella McCartney

4. Try buzzy smaller brands for innovative fabrics
Shopping vegan also offers the opportunity to discover smaller labels. “It’s wonderful to have a wardrobe full of Stella McCartney,” says Roy, “but it’s so worth adding some innovative young designers to your edit. At Bare Fashion, we featured [UCA Rochester graduate] Eirinn Hayhow, who’s showing at London Fashion Week in February.”
Alongside other vegan labels such as actor Rooney Mara’s Hiraeth, look out too for buzzy brands making use of innovative vegan materials. Start with Mara Hoffman’s dreamy silk-free dresses made from TENCEL (a textile derived from wood pulp, also loved by brands including Mother of Pearl and Reformation), and others including BITE Studios, Maggie Marilyn, and Collina Strada who all offer a rose-petal alternative to silk. Try Cossac for its specifically vegan knits, composed of cotton and recycled polyester.
Cossac. Photo: Erea Azurmendi

5. Don’t forget the accessories
Luckily, accessories provide particularly rich territory when it comes to vegan options right now.  If you’re looking for bags, check out the delectable wares at JW Pei, Poppy Lissiman and Ashoka Paris. “The industry is growing exponentially, and I’m sure it will become even easier to find alternatives at more accessible prices in the coming years,” says Topouzoglou, adding that she’s found it easier to find vegan shoes in recent years.

That’s thanks to vegan sneaker brands such as Veja and YATAY, as well as Emma Watson-approved shoe brand Good Guys Don’t Wear Leather. For luxury vegan heels, try London-based Pīferi, founded by former Jimmy Choo designer Alfredo Piferi, or Los Angeles-based Taylor + Thomas, while Spanish brand Mireia Playà is the go-to for recycled vegan boots.

Read Next: 5 Completely Vegan Skincare Brands to Try for Veganuary
Originally published on Vogue.in

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