Supreme

Supreme and Airstream Team Up on a New Travel Trailer—Because Hypebeasts Go Camping, Too

Supreme and Airstream Team Up on a New Travel Trailer—Because Hypebeasts Go Camping, Too

Supreme, the skate and streetwear brand known for its coveted, limited-edition collabs has just unveiled its upcoming spring 2022 collection, and it includes one item in particular that caught our eye: an Airstream trailer. What better way to ensure you have the coolest plot on the campground this summer and beyond?

The delightfully out-of-the-box collaboration is based on one of the caravan maker’s most famous designs—the single-axle travel trailer. Although the item listing don’t say what specific model the 22-foot vehicle is modeled on, we’d put our money on the Caravel based on its windows and floor plan. Neither Supreme nor Airstream immediately responded to a request for comment from Robb Report.

Inside the Supreme X Airstream Travel Trailer 

Supreme

Like many classic Supreme collaborations, the caravan is a straightforward version of Airstream’s travel trailer, only with special branding. And at a glance, that branding is relatively subtle. You’ll find a couple of the shop’s iconic box logos tastefully placed on the vehicle’s aluminum exterior. Then there’s also the red-and-white checkered bedspread, the red ultra-leather seating and finally, and most prominently of all, there’s the pull-out awning which is just a gigantic recreation of the box logo.
Even without these design flourishes—all of which are guaranteed to drive hypebeasts into a frenzy—the collaborative trailer would be worth a look. It has a nice, open layout which has room for a kitchen, dinette, bathroom and bedroom. The kitchen is fully stocked with a stove, convection microwave, a sink with a Moen faucet and plenty of counter space, while the bathroom has a sink, toilet and a shower with a built-in seat. Meanwhile, the bedroom has room for 54-inch by 80-inch mattress and the dinette can be converted into a sleeping area, meaning the caravan can comfortably sleep four adults. Other features include custom flooring, climate control and an HDTV and DVD player.

Supreme

The first drop from Supreme’s latest collection will arrive this Thursday. It’s unclear how many of the travel trailers will be available and how much they’ll cost. We expect the answers are not many and a lot, especially since the standard Caravel starts at $70,500.
Regardless the price, it’ll still be less expensive than a comprehensive set of box logo tees.

What To Expect From the Tiffany & Co. X Supreme Collaboration

What To Expect From the Tiffany & Co. X Supreme Collaboration

Photo: Instagram.com/tiffanyandco
Tiffany & Co. is on a hot streak. Since being acquired by LVMH in January of this year, the New York luxury jeweler has repeatedly made news: celebrity partnerships and faces, a new collection with a limited edition artist collaboration component, neighborhood pop-up shops, and now a blockbuster partnership with Supreme. The six-piece collaboration draws on the iconic Return to Tiffany collection, adjusting the tags with a quippy “Return to Supreme” line. There are pearls—a truly androgynous trend piece—as well as sterling silver keychains, a star bracelet, and heart tag earrings.
Supreme teased the collaboration over the weekend on their social media, showing the freshwater cultured pearl necklace with silver tag worn with a simple white t-shirt—no text to explain. Come Monday morning, both brands had confirmed the November 11 release.

The collaboration, which starts at $54 and caps at $1250, is an introductory price point for the luxury jeweler and hits a demographic that may be enticed by Beyoncé in the Tiffany Yellow Diamond, Jay-Z in a Schlumberger brooch, or Hailey Bieber in yellow gold and diamond pieces, but unable to buy the higher-priced items. It also speaks to Alexandre Arnault’s involvement in the brand. Arnault, son of LVMH’s chairman Bernard Arnault and current VP of product and communications at Tiffany & Co., is the former CEO of Rimowa and has collaborated with Supreme to much success in his past role.

Supreme x Emilio Pucci Collaboration to Drop This Week

Supreme x Emilio Pucci Collaboration to Drop This Week

It seems that Supreme collectors will have to wait until Thursday to put their hands on one of the most rumored collaborations of the year, the one with the Emilio Pucci brand.
On Sunday, both Supreme and the Florentine fashion house posted an image on their official Instagram accounts featuring skateboarder and music producer Sage Elsesser wearing an outfit from the collaboration: jersey shorts with an elastic waistband matched with a coordinated boxy shirt, all splashed with a signature Emilio Pucci allover print in pink, white, black and electric blue.
Supreme accompanied the image shot by David Sims with a caption reading 6/10/21, which, in keeping with the American brand’s tradition, is supposed to coincide with the date of the release of the collection. More outfits are expected to be unveiled on Instagram in the next few days.

Supreme is not new to such collaborations. Last year, it partnered with Yohji Yamamoto and in 2017 with Louis Vuitton, for example.

Supreme and Emilio Pucci have announced a collaboration dropping June 10. 
Courtesy of Supreme.

Emilio Pucci, controlled by LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton, has made a variety of fashion statements under a slew of designers, from Peter Dundas to Massimo Giorgetti, but is to return to its roots as a resort-focused brand. Most recently, the storied label had recently experimented with guest designers, including Christelle Kocher of France and Japan’s Tomo Koizumi, and may continue with occasional collaborations.

On Sunday, the Emilio Pucci brand was not reachable for further details about the distribution of the capsule.
The new Supreme store in Milan, the first opened by the streetwear brand in Italy, inaugurated last month, may also carry the Emilio Pucci X Supreme collection.
Spanning over about 1,080 square feet, the store, which is located on Corso Garibaldi, in the Brera district, occupies a corner retail space featuring six massive floor-to-ceiling windows, some of them offering a view of the Basilica di San Simpliciano, which dates back to the fourth century.
The store, which carries the brand’s ready-to-wear and accessories assortments displayed on wooden shelves and metal racks, features a wooden floor and white walls decorated by colorful murals by American pop art artist Nate Lowman. In addition, at the entrance, two joyful and ironic sculptures by artist and professional skateboarder Mark Gonzales welcome customers, while a digital photo collage created by Weirdo Dave occupies an entire wall. The same wall also hosts a selection of skateboards.
In Europe, Supreme also operates boutiques in Paris, in the Marais district, and in London in the SoHo area. In the U.S., the Supreme retail network includes units in Manhattan, Brooklyn, San Francisco and Los Angeles, while in Asia, the brand has six shops in Japan.
At the end of last year, VF Corp, the Denver-based group parent to The North Face, Vans and Timberland, acquired Supreme for $2.1 billion.
See also: 
Is Supreme’s New Shop in Milan the Coolest Retail Spot in Town?
Supreme: VF’s ‘Simple, Beautiful Machine’
Who is the next Supreme?

Streetwear Enthusiasts Flock to Supreme Milan Store Despite COVID-19 Restrictions

Streetwear Enthusiasts Flock to Supreme Milan Store Despite COVID-19 Restrictions

MILAN — About 150 cool kids in their teens and 20s gathered outside the Supreme store in Milan Thursday morning ahead of the official opening at 11 a.m. CET sharp.
A sample of Italy’s streetwear community, many wearing their Nike x Sacai and Air Jordans sneakers, holding skateboards in their hands and clad in at least one Supreme item, flooded the small square adjoining the store on Corso Garibaldi 20.
Not everybody was actually able to enter the store. Due in part to COVID-19-related containment measures, shoppers were required to enter a raffle online to secure a chance to shop, but this didn’t prevent brand enthusiasts from congregating in the surrounding streets and bars to witness the opening event.

One man in his 30s, who goes by the nickname Yazou, was traveling in Milan and was among those who didn’t win the raffle but stopped by anyway.
“I was hoping to buy the Box logo T-shirt this time. I’m no longer buying that many Supreme pieces to be honest because I think the soul of the brand has vanished a bit,” he offered, clad in floral Supreme trousers crafted from a vintage Ralph Lauren fabric. “Back in 2016 when they opened in Paris, it was still cool with all the artists’ collabs, but then it turned into a brand for rich kids.”

Yazou, a French guy in his 30s, was in Milan for the opening of the Supreme store. 
Martino Carrera/WWD

One of the streetwear brand’s most sought-after items, the so-called Box logo is Supreme’s signature white T-shirt bearing the logo superimposed on a red background. Coinciding with each new store opening, the streetwear brand releases a special version — this time featuring the image of Leonardo Da Vinci’s “The Last Supper,” the mural painting treasured at the refectory of Milan’s Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie.

Francesco Marchi, a 21-year-old law student, was hoping to buy the T-shirt, describing it as the most collectible piece. “Since I discovered the brand in 2014 in New York I’ve been buying something every year, I wear them a lot but also know that they have a value in the secondary market,” he said.
When 27-year-old Andrea Fraschi, a Milan-based architect that was the first to make a purchase at the store on Thursday morning, came out, his shopping bags filled with Supreme items, a large crowd gathered around him to take pictures as he proudly showed off the T-shirt.
By mid-afternoon, the T-shirt was available on popular resale platform StockX for $468. It originally retailed for 44 euros, or $53 at current exchange rates.

Andrea Fraschi scooped up the Supreme’s Box logo T-shirt dedicated to the Milan store opening. 
Martino Carrera/WWD

“I’ve been collecting Supreme stuff since 2013, around the time when I started developing a passion for the streetwear scene, graffiti art and the brand, of course,” Fraschi told WWD. He added it’s always hard to buy online as pieces fly off immediately so whenever he has a chance, he stops by the brand’s retail units worldwide to scoop up a new piece. This time he took home a denim suit in addition to the T-shirt and a skateboard deck — although he has never practiced skateboarding.
Zheng Xin, a Chinese art student in Turin, traveled all the way to Milan to buy some hoodies, but she said she’s not really into the traditional logoed pieces. “I’ve started collecting Supreme only two years ago, but I’m really drawn to their easy flair, it’s very fashionable but laid-back,” she said.

The Milan unit is only the second store Supreme opens in continental Europe, after Paris, which was unveiled in 2016. The brand also operates a door in London’s Soho, in addition to flagships in the U.S. and Japan.

The scene at the Supreme’s Milan store’s opening on May 6. 
Martino Carrera/WWD

The brand has been at the center of a trademark dispute in Italy over the past few years with local counterfeiters. In 2019, Italy’s Corte di Cassazione, the country’s equivalent of the Supreme Court, ruled in favor of New York’s Supreme.
SEE ALSO: 
‘Key’ Supreme Executive Set for VF Stock Pay Day
Supreme: VF’s ‘Simple, Beautiful Machine’
Who Is the Next Supreme?

Is Supreme’s New Shop in Milan the Coolest Retail Spot in Town?

Is Supreme’s New Shop in Milan the Coolest Retail Spot in Town?

MILAN — One of the most anticipated retail events of the year, the opening of the Supreme store in Milan, will certainly bring some cool factor to the city’s central Corso Garibaldi in the Brera district.
The store, which is officially opening to the public on Thursday, was unveiled to a small group of journalists and friends of the house on Wednesday afternoon. Spanning about 1,080-square-feet, the store occupies a corner retail space featuring six massive floor-to-ceiling windows, some of them offering a view of the Basilica di San Simpliciano, which dates back to the fourth century.

Supreme store in Milan. 
Courtesy of Milan

Inside, the store, which carries the brand’s ready-to-wear and accessories assortments displayed on wooden shelves and metal racks, features a wooden floor and white walls decorated by colorful murals by American pop art artist Nate Lowman. In addition, at the entrance, two joyful and ironic sculptures by artist and professional skateboarder Mark Gonzales welcome customers, while a digital photo collage created by Weirdo Dave occupies an entire wall. The same wall also hosts a selection of skateboards.

For the opening of the Milan store, Supreme created a limited-edition set, exclusively available at the shop, including a T-shirt featuring an image of the Leonardo Da Vinci’s The Last Supper, the mural painting treasured at the refectory of Milan’s Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie.

Supreme store in Milan. 
Courtesy of Milan

This the first store opened in Italy by Supreme, which was founded by James Jebbia in 1994. In Europe, Supreme already operates boutique in Paris, in the Marais district, and in London in the SoHo area. In the U.S., Supreme retail network includes units in Manhattan, Brooklyn, San Francisco and Los Angeles, while in Asia, the brand has six shops in Japan.
At the end of last year, VF Corp, the Denver-based group parent to The North Face, Vans and Timberland, acquired Supreme for $2.1 billion.
See also: 
‘Key’ Supreme Executive Set for VF Stock Pay Day
Supreme: VF’s ‘Simple, Beautiful Machine’
Who is the next Supreme?

PHP Code Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com