Supercar

This Rare, Street-Legal Jaguar XJR-15 Could Sell for up to $1.4 Million at Auction

This Rare, Street-Legal Jaguar XJR-15 Could Sell for up to $1.4 Million at Auction

An ultra-exclusive road car based on one of Jaguar’s greatest racers is about to go up for grabs.

RM Sotheby’s will auction off a 1991 XJR-15 as part of its upcoming Monterey Car Week sales slate. Not only is the stunning speed machine one of the best looking supercars of the 1990s, it’s also one of only 27 examples that were street legal.
At the dawn of the 1990s, Jaguar was back on top of the endurance racing world. The British marque had been a winner’s circle fixture during the ‘50s, but had gone decades without tasting victory at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. A Jag finally reclaimed the checkered flag in 1988 and repeated the feat in 1990. Those races were won by two different (but related) cars, the XJR-9 and XJR-12, both of which were built by Tom Wilkenshaw Racing. The builder was able to convince the automaker that there would be interest in a road car inspired by the winning racers. This would end up being the XJR-15, which featured a chassis based on the one found in the XJR-9, a new futuristic design and was the first street-legal car made primarily of carbon fiber.

RM Sotheby’s

Jaguar Sport—a joint venture between the marque and Tom Wilkenshaw Racing—would build just 50 XJR-15s between 1990 and 1992. This particular example, chassis no. 018, was one of the street-legal models. The body—which was designed Peter Stevens, who was also responsible for the McLaren F1—is finished in a rich coat of metallic dark blue, which helps accentuate its elegant lines. The two-person cabin is spartan, but also equipped with two comfortable leather racing seats. Although the car is over 30 years old, it was restored to factory condition in 2015 and looks brand new.
The XJR-15 is as capable as it is good looking. It is powered by a mid-mounted 5.3-liter V-12 almost identical to the one found in the XJR-9. That mill was mighty enough to push the vehicle to a top speed of 215 mph when it was brand new. One quirk about this example—which is known as the “Japan Study Car” because it was used for aerodynamic and other testing—is that it’s equipped with a five-speed transaxle gearbox, instead of the race-tuned, six-speed gearbox found in other examples. It has only 1,000 miles of use, so it should drive pretty well too.

The XJR-15’s interior 

RM Sotheby’s

Interested in adding this historically important supercar to your garage? RM Sotheby’s expects the car to sell for between $1.2 million and $1.4 million when it hits the block on August 20. And considering the condition it’s in, that might just be a bargain.

Click here to see all the photos of the 1991 Jaguar XJR-15.

RM Sotheby’s

Lamborghini Just Recorded Its Best Half-Year Sales Ever

Lamborghini Just Recorded Its Best Half-Year Sales Ever

If the Lamborghini bellwether is to be believed, we might be reaching peak supercar.

The Sant’Agata Bolognese marque recently posted its best first-half sales ever, with deliveries climbing to a record 5,090 vehicles and profit leaping nearly 70 percent to roughly $433 million (€425 million). Those numbers are no surprise given pandemic shoppers’ unquenchable appetite for luxury combined with an easing supply chain. On top of that, the Raging Bull had the momentum of a record-setting 2021. Soaring sales are also being enjoyed by Ferrari, the friendly competitors across Motor Valley, which just claimed a record second quarter with an impressive 3,455 cars delivered, for a 29 percent gain compared to the prior year.

The US accounted for 1,521 car deliveries. 

Lamborghini

But hot-selling supercars beg an inevitable question: Is it all downhill from here? According to a recent Reuters report, there’s reason to believe the party may indeed soon be over—but not for lack of well-heeled buyers. The perfect storm a-brewin’ has more to do with messy global politics than consumer desire, specifically an impending energy crunch that portends tougher times ahead. Russia’s threats to cut off natural gas supplies to Western Europe has inspired Lambo to bank the energy source in an effort to anticipate the potential shortage.

SUVs are responsible for 61 percent of Lamborghini sales. 

Lamborghini

Adding fuel to the forthcoming fire is the fact that Lamborghini’s lineup is at a crossroads of electrification, with pure internal combustion V-10s and V-12s meeting their demise this year. The automaker has promised hybrid drivetrains coupled with naturally aspirated engines next, and an all-electric four-seat model by 2028. This could throw a potential wrench into Lambo’s upward trajectory. Let’s also not forget the other paradigm shift that has been affecting the ultra-luxury market: SUVs. The once-unfashionable genre now accounts for 61 percent of Lamborghini sales. In addition, the first Ferrari crossover is expected to be revealed this September and could further shift the tastes and tendencies of this very specific luxury consumer.
If and when those dark days do arrive, don’t be surprised to see 2022 go down in history as the year supercars enjoyed their brightest moment in the sun.

Why the Countach and LM002 Are the Iconic Cars of Lamborghini’s Soon-to-End V-12 Era

Why the Countach and LM002 Are the Iconic Cars of Lamborghini’s Soon-to-End V-12 Era

As Lamborghini’s longstanding era of pure V-12 power comes to a close, the carmaker says it will cling to the supernumerary powerplant configuration while adding hybrid technology to the mix. That’s a win for enthusiasts who are attached to cylinder count (and can appreciate the boosted torque of added electricity), but a mixed bag for those with a soft spot for the way things were. To understand where we are at this crossroads of electrification, let’s take a look back at two of Lamborghini’s dramatically different V-12 models.

A Poster Car is Born

Lamborghini Countach 5000 Quattrovalvole 

Lamborghini

By 1971, Lamborghini was hot on the heels of the slinky Miura and ready to unveil the Countach. The wedge-shaped supercar was so wild looking that its name was allegedly lifted from the Piedmontese expletive uttered by a gobsmacked observer. But it was more than a pretty face: The Countach’s 12-cylinder powerplant was an important signifier of excess that matched the brand’s outlandish styling and bad boy image. The follow-up to the Miura organized the 60-degree V-12 engine longitudinally rather than sideways, growing to 5.0 liters of displacement.

The supercar that would land on seemingly every kid’s poster started life as a more minimalist model. Devoid of spoilers and fender flares, the so-called “Periscope” LP400 appealed on a different level thanks to its alien looks and smooth, flush surfaces. Not until the debut of the heavily flared LP 400 S model in the film “The Cannonball Run” did the Countach land on posters everywhere, flaunting sexy hips, low-profile Pirelli P7 tires, and an angular rear wing.
Platform Sharing Extraordinaire

Lamborghini LM002 

Lamborghini

Sports car fanatics often revert to finger pointing at SUVs, but Lamborghini presciently adopted the genre long before it was cool to diss sport ‘utes. Case in point: the oddly-named LM002, which leveraged the 5.2-liter V-12 from the later Countach models and stuffed it into a boxy body that later earned the nickname “Rambo Lambo,” partly inspired by one owned by Sylvester Stallone. Originally commissioned as a military vehicle under the “Cheetah” moniker, the LM002 made several modifications to the V-12, including rotating it 180 degrees in order to accommodate all-wheel drive hardware and trimming 20 hp so it could run on cheaper fuels found in remote regions. No Lamborghini story is complete without an absurd postscript, and in the LM002’s case it pertains to a special model that was outfitted with a 700 horsepower, 7.2-liter V-12 typically reserved for offshore racing boats.

Future Absurdity
If Lamborghini’s just-unveiled offroad Huracan is any indication, the folks in Sant’Agata still have their finger on the pulse for all things ridiculous; the slideways supercar lives just on the right side of crazy. Ideas just wacky enough to work have been a hallmark of brand since Ferruccio Lamborghini formed the company in 1963 to spite Enzo Ferrari, and all signs point to that trend continuing. If looking back at 60 years of V-12s teaches us anything, it’s that adaptability can go both ways—launch a ludicrous engine, but amortize the effort across several engines so it makes sense. Here’s to hoping Lamborghini’s upcoming hybrids are as sensational as their pure internal combustion engines of the past.

First Drive: Lamborghini’s 631 hp Huracàn Tecnica Is a Snarling Beast—With Manners

First Drive: Lamborghini’s 631 hp Huracàn Tecnica Is a Snarling Beast—With Manners

Every generation of supercar faces a twilight that can end in one of two ways: extinction or reinvention. Eight years ago, the V-10-powered Huracàn debuted as an entry-level coupe for Lamborghini, which eventually saved the Italian brand from irrelevance by selling more examples than every model prior since the marque’s founding in 1963. As the Huracán approaches its own fin de siècle, Lamborghini offers the Tecnica as a penultimate take on the snarling supercar (yes, there will be one more Huracàn down the road) that helped reinvent the Sant’Agata-based automaker.

Lamborghini has promised a fully hybridized lineup by 2024, but the Tecnica is pure internal combustion. Spoiler alert: after track time with the car at Circuit Ricardo Tormo and the roads that ramble through its hilly surroundings in Valencia, Spain, we’re pleased to report that it will be a happy ending for Lamborghini’s octane-powered era.

The Lamborghini Huracàn Tecnica at Circuit Ricardo Tormo in Valencia, Spain. 

Wolfango Spaccarelli, courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A.

Bisecting the more workaday Huracàn EVO and the track-focused STO, the Tecnica borrows the latter’s 631 hp engine while easing up on its actively managed downforce and stiff suspension, enabling a more accessible skillset while achieving a higher top speed of 202 mph. Lamborghini claims improved exhaust notes at higher rpms, but the furious ten-cylinder was never wanting in the sonic department. This bad boy has lungs, with a vocal signature that ranges from thrummy bass at idle to searing bellow at the top of its 8,200 rpm rev range.

The 5.2-liter, naturally aspirated V-10 engine makes 417 ft lbs of torque and allows a top speed of 202 mph. 

Wolfango Spaccarelli, courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A.

Whatever visual extroversion is sacrificed from the STO’s huge wing and sharp-edged bodywork is tempered by geometric touches, like the “ypsilon” accents against the edges of the headlamps. The slots work with dedicated ducts that help keep the brakes cooler and longer lasting. Interestingly, designer Manuele Amprimo says that the Tecnica’s rear shoulders were trimmed down in order to visually emphasize the model’s rear-wheel-drive setup. Weight-saving measures trim 22 pounds compared to the EVO model, while a recalibrated four-wheel-steering system is tailored for the model’s rear-drive configuration. Appropriately, the 5.2-liter V-10 engine is celebrated beneath a faceted window panel, unlike the race-ready STO’s carbon-fiber rear section.

The Tecnica’s rear shoulders were trimmed down in order to visually emphasize the model’s rear-wheel-drive setup. 

Wolfango Spaccarelli, courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A.

“This is not a facelift,” insists Rouven Mohr, Lamborghini’s new chief technical officer, “this is much closer to the STO.” I take those words to heart as I’m strapped into a Tecnica in pit lane at the 25-turn circuit, ready to chase an STO piloted by a pro racer. As with all Huracàns, the start button is protected by a hinged, missile-launcher-style shield. But this being my umpteenth Huracán rodeo, I simply reach through the gap in the shield to depress the button, igniting all 10 cylinders into a reassuringly mechanical hum.

Drive modes are activated via a toggle on the steering wheel, and follow the Huracán’s all-in-one theme of encapsulating controls onto the flat-bottomed rim, offering a race theme that’s similar to that of the competition across the valley in Maranello. There may be slightly less tactile precision in this application, but rising through the revs and tapping the large aluminum paddles imparts a feeling of seriousness. Available carbon-fiber door cards from the STO heighten that impression, though there’s a certain in-the-know stealthiness to omitting the boy-racer bits.

Drive modes are activated via a toggle on the steering wheel, and follow the Huracán’s all-in-one theme of encapsulating controls onto the flat-bottomed rim. 

Wolfango Spaccarelli, courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A.

Whatever go-fast pretentions this Lamborghini puts forth with its styling, it backs up in capability. Smash the right pedal, and Tecnica lurches forward in a howling, long-winded climb through each of the 7 gears. Lamborghini’s predetermined playbook dictates that the behaviors of each performance feature—suspension, stability control, steering, shifting and the like are constrained by each drive mode and cannot be individually customized.
Strada (road) is the mild setup for lolling about when you’d rather be daydreaming about sweets than speed: shifts come slow and early, and the ride quality is accommodating. Here on the track, we’re focused on Sport and Corsa (race) modes, which offer more animated, entertaining dynamics or lap time–focused performance, respectively. There’s a bit of a devil’s deal involved with each setting.

Bridgestone’s Potenza Race tires wrap around the Tecnica’s 20-inch wheels. 

Wolfango Spaccarelli, courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A.

Need the quickest way around the track? You’ll want Corsa—but you can’t let the brilliant transmission help with gear shifts, because the mode is manual only. I love tapping the paddles just as much as the next lead foot, but the 8,200 rpm engine revs so quickly that it’s taxing to focus so much attention on the perfect millisecond for shifting when you’re also focused on timing your threshold braking, turn-in points, mid-corner adjustments and exits.
Sport mode offers a different experience, with slightly softer suspension and more lenient stability control that enables the charismatic V-10 to send the rear wheels spinning. Let’s say, however, that you want tighter suspension but more free-spirited traction control, or automatic shifting along with track time–focused stability control. Well, you’re out of luck. Lamborghini’s so-called EGO mode, which enables individually customized drive modes, was introduced in the Aventador S and migrated into the Urus. Curiously, it’s not available in the Tecnica.

This Raging Bull has a vocal signature that ranges from thrummy bass to searing bellow. 

Wolfango Spaccarelli, courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A.

Regardless of the three-sizes-fit-all approach, the Tecnica makes quick work of the race circuit with its outstanding accuracy, exceptional grip and deft management of power and finesse. The Bridgestone Potenza Race rubber seems eerily surefooted until the reins are loosened on the stability-control system, which creates an almost disconcerting sensation of tail sliding as the angry engine sends torque to the rear wheels. But modulated with the proper balance of aggression and restraint, the Tecnica proves itself an exceptional dance partner, feeling potent yet just irascible enough to bring an edge to the racetrack proceedings.
What sets the Tecnica apart from the lean, mean STO is its on-road feel. Unlike the dialed-to-11 STO, the Tecnica brings more breadth to the table, not always feeling manic or wound up. In the supercar spectrum, this particular model lineup doesn’t have quite the extremes of, say, McLaren’s LT offerings, whose abusive rides and razor-sharp responses nearly make them caricatures of race cars. In that regard, the Tecnica can be easy to drive in its Strada setting, or satisfyingly aggressive in Sport and Corsa.

Whatever go-fast pretentions this Lamborghini puts forth with its styling, it backs up in capability. 

Wolfango Spaccarelli, courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A.

On the road, you’ll never know the depths of the Tecnica’s exceptional stopping capability provided by its carbon-ceramic brakes, or the wizardry of the vectoring systems that help the vehicle negotiate the complexities of a race circuit. But it’s also the elemental parts of this Huracán that appeal on such a simple level: The analog snarl of the power plant, the direct honesty of the chassis and the linearity of its responsiveness. The Lamborghini Huracán Tecnica’s ode to internal combustion purity is sung loud, strong and sweet. No matter how fabulous the next chapter, this one will be missed.
Click here to see all the photos of the First Drive of the Lamborghini Huracán Tecnica.

The Lamborghini Huracàn Tecnica. 

A Rare 1980 BMW M1, the Marque’s Supercar Collab With Lamborghini, Is Up for Auction

A Rare 1980 BMW M1, the Marque’s Supercar Collab With Lamborghini, Is Up for Auction

Now could be your chance to add one of the rarest modern BMWs to your garage.

A gorgeous and excellently preserved M1 is currently up for auction on Bring a Trailer. The coupé, an all-too-rare example of the only supercar the marque has ever built, should be of note to any serious collector, but especially those with a thing for German-made autos.
The M1 was born out of a partnership struck by BMW and Lamborghini to build a race car during the 1970s. The resulting road car featured a glorious wedge design by the legendary Giorgetto Giugiaro and a mid-mounted 3.5-liter DOHC straight-six that could pump out 274 hp. Unfortunately, production difficulties and some bad luck—Lamborghini had to drop out because of financial difficulties—meant the M1 cost a relative fortune for the era ($115,000, which was twice as much as the Ferrari 308) and sold poorly because of that, according to BMW Blog. In 1981, three years after it launched, the German marque pulled the plug on the vehicle, with only around 400 street-legal examples having rolled off the line.

Inside the 1980 BMW M1 

Bring a Trailer

This particular M1, chassis no. 292, was built and sold in 1980. Its exterior is finished in gloss black and its interior in black leather and checked cloth. The color scheme isn’t the only thing that matches. The coupé is also equipped with its original 3.5-liter straight-six, which is mated to a five-speed manual gearbox. Although it’s 42 years old, the car, which was originally sold to an owner in the UK but has since been brought to the US, looks to be in impeccable shape. It has about 30,000 miles on the odometer, which isn’t nothing, but also isn’t all that bad considering its age. It also suggests the car has been semi-regularly driven, which is a good thing.
Of course, because it’s in such good condition, this M1 likely won’t come cheap. With more than nine days left to go in the auction, bidding has already reached $310,000. MotorTrend reports that well-maintained M1s can sell for up to $600,000 today, so we expect that number will climb in the days to come.

Click here to see all the photos of the 1980 BMW M1 supercar.

Bring a Trailer

Car of the Week: One of Only 30 Made, This Pristine 1994 Bugatti EB110 Super Sport Is Up for Auction

Car of the Week: One of Only 30 Made, This Pristine 1994 Bugatti EB110 Super Sport Is Up for Auction

Indisputably one of the most esteemed automotive names in history, Bugatti became a bit of an orphan after its founder passed. Ettore Bugatti started his company in 1909, and his son Jean, architect of the marque’s most important models, died in 1939—at the age of 30—while testing the Type 57 “Tank.”

Ettore passed away in 1947 at the age of 66, and by 1959, with about 8,000 cars having been made in the 50 years since Bugatti began, his eponymous company became defunct, ignominiously sold to Hispano-Suiza. Nothing substantial was made after Ettore’s death, until Romano Artioli resurrected the brand in 1987. His Bugatti EB110 is a fascinating chapter in the automaker’s history, sandwiched between the founding father’s company and the marque we know today that was brought back to life yet again, this time by the Volkswagen Group. And the latter’s Molsheim-made Veyrons, Chirons and Whatever-rons rule the hypercar roost in our modern times.

The 1994 Bugatti EB110 Super Sport crossing the auction block through Gooding & Company in August. 

Mathieu Heurtault, courtesy of Gooding & Company.

The 1990’s-era Bugatti S.p.A. was the brainchild of Italian entrepreneur Artioli, who launched the EB110 in 1991—its moniker in reference to the 110th anniversary of Ettore Bugatti’s birth. The model reflected some exciting developments in the supercar world at the time. Carbon fiber was the hero of the day, and the EB110’s carbon-fiber tub was woven by Aérospatiale, builder of the Concorde supersonic airliner. The shape, perhaps the car’s most remarkable and timeless attribute, is owed to designer Marcello Gandini, who also penned the Lamborghini Miura, Countach, Diablo and so many other automotive masterpieces that his work should be enshrined in the Uffizi.

With only 615.7 miles on it, the car features a 1990s-era black-leather interior that remains immaculate. 

Mathieu Heurtault, courtesy of Gooding & Company.

Altogether, only 136 examples of the EB110 were produced. The EB110 GT accounted for 106, while the EB110 Super Sport, designed for all-out performance, saw only 30 examples. This most rare and desirable version was previewed in 1992 at the Geneva Motor Show. Its 3.5-liter V-12 engine, developed by former Lamborghini engineer Paolo Stanzani, makes 603 hp—53 hp more than the GT—with 60 dancing valves and four turbochargers feeding 12 individual throttle bodies.

Developed by former Lamborghini engineer Paolo Stanzani, the 3.5-liter V-12 engine makes 603 hp and more than 478 ft lbs of torque. 

Mathieu Heurtault, courtesy of Gooding & Company.

A six-speed manual transmission puts power to all-wheel drive, an advanced platform for its day. Astonishing was the EB110 Super Sport’s performance at the time. Accelerating from zero-to-60 mph in just 3.26 seconds, the vehicle has a top speed of 220 mph. In period,  it nearly stood alone, as no Ferrari, Lamborghini or Porsche could touch it, though the McLaren F1 remains the performance star then (and now). The Bugatti EB110 Super Sport even played a supporting role at the 1994 24 Hours of Le Mans, the first Bugatti to flare its horseshoe grille in anger in 55 years. Competing in the GT1 category, it was the fastest in its class during qualifying.

The all-wheel-drive supercar is able to cover zero to 60 mph in 3.26 seconds. 

Mathieu Heurtault, courtesy of Gooding & Company.

This example, finished in Grigio Chiaro Metallizato (Light Gray Metallic) with a black leather interior, will be offered by Gooding & Company at its Pebble Beach auction, running August 19 and 20. Originally, it was delivered to a German customer in 1994, then went to a Japanese collection and finally back to Switzerland in 2012. Twenty years later, it still shows a mere 991 kilometers (615.7 miles) from new.

This example is finished in “Grigio Chiaro Metallizato” (Light Gray Metallic). 

Mathieu Heurtault, courtesy of Gooding & Company.

Serviced in 2019 by B. Engineering S.r.l. in Italy, it subsequently went to Motion Products for additional cosmetic fettling. Likely the finest and lowest-mileage EB110 Super Sport in existence, this silver bullet will take center stage in any collection of analog-era supercars, and is estimated to fetch as much as $3.5 million.

How Lamborghini’s Esperienza Program Helped Us Take Our Driving to the Next Level

How Lamborghini’s Esperienza Program Helped Us Take Our Driving to the Next Level

A car from Automobili Lamborghini means different things to different people, whether it’s a life-long dream realized, a worthy rival to the house of Maranello, a wedge-shaped status symbol or a bold expression of one’s own self-confidence. But ripping into Sonoma Raceway’s uphill, off-camber first turn at around 145 mph in a Lamborghini Huracán STO provides one conclusive definition. Lamborghini’s origins may be in tractor manufacturing but, today, this Italian-rooted, German-run marque seems determined to produce some of the most exciting vehicles on the planet.

To let enthusiasts find out just how exciting is the mission of a growing menu of Lamborghini Esperienza programs, which seek to bring everyone from collectors to prospective owners into the Raging Bull’s distinctive ring. The idea is a simple one, and increasingly common among luxury automakers looking to woo consumers presented with a growing array of choices: Purchase a car and buy into a lifestyle.

Lamborghini’s Esperienza offerings allow guests the opportunity to sample the prowess of model lines like the Huracán and Aventador. 

Drew Phillips, courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A.

“We want to feel connected to our clients, there can be no distance between us,” says Andrea Baldi, CEO of Lamborghini North America, who is on site for this Esperienza session.
Baldi says Lamborghini customers are, on average, younger “than our competitors,” which, although the name is never mentioned, is assumed to be Ferrari. Specifically, Lambo buyers are between the ages of 35 and 45, and typically CEOs or successful entrepreneurs, according to Baldi. The Esperienza programs offer these guests the opportunity to sample the prowess of model lines like the Huracán and Aventador, as well as the Urus SUV, in a variety of settings around the globe.
When it comes to the Huracán and Aventador, that typically means playing on track or on the snow and ice, while Urus romps are in challenging off-road locations ranging from Iceland to Transylvania. Prices vary due to location and program length, which in some cases can last days and include ancillary adventures such as—in the case of the recent Sonoma outing—winery tours and hot-air balloon flights.

A hot-air balloon flight elevates downtime during the Esperienza in Sonoma. 

Drew Phillips, courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A.

The Urus has been particularly critical to Lamborghini’s resurgence; 70 percent of Urus buyers are new to the brand. But Lamborghini says all current inventory, across model lines, is sold out, and the wait to receive a vehicle can be more than a year. Some Esperienza guests are, in fact, brand-new Lamborghini owners eager to get a sense of the outer limits of their forthcoming purchase.

“For many, they only know their car on the [car configurator] computer screen,” says Baldi. “Here, they can take the real thing to the limit while they await their cars.”
Esperienza programs include Neve (“snow” in Italian), which brings drivers to the Italian Alps to learn the art of drifting Huracán STOs on ice, followed by pampering at the Lac Salin Spa and Mountain Resort in Livigno. Accademia Corsa is for those eager to step into the world of amateur racing. And Giro allows Lamborghini owners to experience lavish, curated road trips—in their own vehicles—on multiple continents.
The Esperienza Avventura option is for those seeking to test the limits of Lambo models on formidable off-road terrain. Last year, customers across Europe and the Middle East took the Urus across rugged gauntlets comprising hundreds of miles. The Iceland trip alone saw the Urus tackle places such as the Geldingadalir Valley, Kvernufoss waterfall and Katla Glacier.

The growing menu of Lamborghini Esperienza events welcome newcomers into the Raging Bull’s distinctive ring. 

Drew Phillips, courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A.

Finally, there is Esperienza Dinamica, which provides access to a full complement of Lamborghini models on and off track, and, in the version that unfolds in Italy, can include an exclusive trip to both the factory and the fabled circuit at Imola.
Robb Report was recently invited to an abridged version of the Dinamica program on a gloriously sunny afternoon in Sonoma, Calif., just north of San Francisco. The activity kicked off with 90 minutes of Urus seat time in the hills above the racetrack. A team of seven instructors were on hand to counsel and guide, including Richard Antinucci—multiple-time winner of Lamborghini’s Super Trofeo series.
Most of the drive was meant to showcase the SUV’s versatility, from hunkered-down speed demon to comfortable off-road mountain goat. At one 18 percent incline, the Urus quietly and capably summited the rise at a steady 15 mph, and then took itself down the other side calmly in hill-descent mode without me having to touch the pedals.

The 641 hp Urus SUV demonstrates its off-road acumen. 

Drew Phillips, courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A.

A bit more challenging was a slalom run across a dusty dirt road. Given that the SUV’s 641 hp twin-turbo V-8 can rocket the Urus to 60 mph in 3.1 seconds, sliding it through the cones takes some getting used to. Ultimately, it’s a rewarding experience that awakens my inner child, much like sledding down a snowy embankment.

But the real fun happens next. Antinucci and his fellow instructors are paired up with guests for personalized lead- follow sessions on a track that is well known for its elevation changes. For the first set of laps, the instructors lead in the Huracán STO while participants pilot Huracán Evos.
On paper, the two cars seem similar, packing the same 5.2-liter V-10. But the STO, costing nearly a third more, is the Evo on a race diet. A combination of active aerodynamics and acres of carbon fiber mean the STO is a scalpel to the Evo’s steak knife.

All smiles after a high-performance game of follow the leader—Lamborghini style. 

Drew Phillips, courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A.

My Evo is set in fully automatic mode, and makes me feel like a champ. Shifting on its own through seven speeds, the Evo allows the driver to fully concentrate on, in this case, making sure the wide tires follow Antinucci’s line as closely as possible. Also critical is to brake precisely where the pro does. Do both with reasonable skill and you feel like an ace.
But the game changes when the cars are swapped. I’m buckled into the shark-like STO when a hand reaches in and flips a steering wheel–mounted switch from STO mode to Trofeo mode, effectively telling the car that it’s truly track time.
What I don’t know is that Trofeo mode puts the car permanently in manual, meaning that, in addition to the racing line, apexes and braking points, I now have to worry about the redline. For a number of turns, I hit that 9,000 rpm point, repeatedly. My eyes are glued to the blurring track, so the sound is all I have to dial in my paddle-shifted changes.
Eventually, I get the hang of it and the STO truly comes alive. A rhythm slowly gets established on the uphill sweeps, downhill plunges and quick shifts from fifth gear down to second before a series of sinuous S-curves. By the time a level of comfort settles in, it’s time to pit and hand back the helmet and balaclava in exchange for a welcome high-five from Antinucci.

A dinner at the Donum Estate winery caps off a day of track work. 

Drew Phillips, courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A.

I certainly learned about my own limits, and even pushed them a bit. But the true gift of the Esperienza program lies in experiencing all of this in the company of folks for whom buying a Lamborghini means more than simply getting the keys to a new car.

“We are car builders, not retailers, but that doesn’t mean we can’t share the passion we have and become friends with our clients,” says Baldi. “And when you’re at speed, the barriers break down.”

The Only White Ferrari Enzo Supercar Made Is About to Hit the Auction Block

The Only White Ferrari Enzo Supercar Made Is About to Hit the Auction Block

A claimed 400 examples of Ferrari’s Enzo supercar were built during its brief production life from roughly 2002 through 2004. Most were painted Rosso Corsa red, some were Nero black and a handful were retina-searing Gallo Modena yellow. But only one left the factory in icy Bianco Avus white. Now, after years of being hidden away in a private collection, that Ferrari unicorn, the “White Enzo,” is crossing the online auction block next week through RM Sotheby’s—with no reserve. Get ready to count the zeros.

“Strikingly beautiful, unspeakably rare and ready to serve as the jewel in the crown of any leading collection of modern Ferrari masterpieces, it is quite simply the best of the best,” states RM Sotheby’s in its listing.

The 2003 Ferrari Enzo being auctioned online next week through RM Sotheby’s. 

Desmond Chan, courtesy of RM Sotheby’s.

The auction house isn’t putting an estimate as to how much the Enzo might go for, but, back in 2015, the very last Enzo built—sent to the Pope to raise money for charity—was sold by RM Sotheby’s for more than $6 million. In 2021, a black 2003 Enzo went for $3.36 million. In today’s super-heated Ferrari market, a price somewhere in the middle is perhaps a good guesstimate
The car, chassis No. 133032, was completed in May of 2003 for German-Swiss billionaire Luitpold von Finck, chairman of the Mövenpick hospitality group. He’d specified Bianco Avus paint, and trim that included a black leather interior, red for the instruments and seat belts and wider carbon-fiber bucket seats with black cloth inserts.

Official badging that denotes Bianco Avus as the color this Ferrari Enzo was painted at the factory. 

RM Sotheby’s

The vehicle was one of 20 Enzos described as extracampionario (special order) examples that were, no doubt begrudgingly, allowed to be painted in non-standard colors for highly favored clients. Mr. von Finck reportedly kept the car in Switzerland, mostly in the window of a friend’s car-dealership showroom, before selling it to a Hong Kong collector in 2011. Unable to be officially registered in Hong Kong because of having its steering wheel on the left, the car was tucked away as part of the owner’s large automotive stable. Its lack of use is shown by the current odometer reading of just 9,600 km (5,965 miles).

The interior was commissioned to feature black leather, red instruments and seat belts and wider carbon-fiber bucket seats with black cloth inserts. 

RM Sotheby’s

According to RM Sotheby’s, the Enzo has been fully authenticated through Maranello’s Ferrari Classiche program, complete with the coveted Ferrari Red Book certifying and detailing the car’s complete build process. It’s also just had a full annual service. Interestingly, in the lead up to the auction, the Enzo had been offered for sale by one of Hong Kong’s exotic car dealers with a price that was available on request. It seems there were no takers.

According to the current odometer reading, the car has 9,600 km (5,965 miles) on it. 

Desmond Chan, courtesy of RM Sotheby’s.

Named after il Commendatore himself, founder Enzo Ferrari, the Enzo was the successor to the legendary F40 and, later, F50. Featuring a lightweight carbon-fiber monocoque chassis, the car derived its power from a mid-mounted 6.0-liter V-12 cranking out a staggering-for-the-time 651 hp and 485 ft lbs of torque. This allowed the Enzo to go from zero to 60 mph in 3.6 seconds and reach a top speed of 217 mph, making it one of the quickest supercars of its day. The auction kicks off at 4 a.m. ET on June 29, ending promptly at Noon ET on June 30.

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