streetwear

The Trends That Dominated StockX, The RealReal in 2021 and What’s Next

The Trends That Dominated StockX, The RealReal in 2021 and What’s Next

Luxury consignor The RealReal and streetwear reseller StockX both dropped their latest trend insight reports Thursday, showcasing what’s hot and not in the resale world.For its report, The RealReal combed shopping insights of more than 24 million shoppers, comparing year-over-year data from January to November for the past two years. The company touted the stat that 40 percent of its shoppers are swapping fast fashion for resale with many more getting into the selling fold.
The RealReal president Rati Sahi Levesque attributes resale’s success to a cross-generational appeal, in the report, describing the behavior as a “handoff happening between generations” — one that’s aided by a desire for uniqueness.

And there’s no better place to begin than Gucci, a brand that is considered a gateway for first-timers, as The RealReal noted. The brand was the most popular for first-time shoppers and consignors alike.

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In 2021, Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Prada and Chanel were consistently in the top ranks for resale value. As for contemporary brands, Rag & Bone and Tory Burch took the lead.
But everything comes back around.
The RealReal noted ‘90s designers are being increasingly sanctioned into resale relevance with Jean Paul Gaultier dresses and Thierry Mugler skirt suits both up 70 percent in resale value. Per its report, a Gaultier dress can earn up to $2,100, while a Mugler skirt suit set can earn a solid $952 in resale value.
What’s trending now?
Vivienne Westwood corsets, vintage Prada coats and Missoni cardigans were in the trending mix. The RealReal urges shoppers ready to sell now to part with their Chrome Hearts Trucker hats, Patek Philippe Nautilus wares, vintage minidresses from Emilio Pucci (a designer who also got top play in StockX’s report), Chanel costume jewelry and Bottega Veneta Chelsea boots for maximum return on investment.
Meanwhile, Millennials still can’t get enough of the Fendi Baguette or Louis Vuitton Multicolore Monogram bags, perhaps stoked by its resurgence in “And Just Like That” and ensuing TikTok demand where #FendiBaguette alone has more than 2.7 million views. The LV Multicolore bags were a colorful reminder of Y2K peak, though the designs by Japanese artist Takashi Murakami were discontinued in 2015. But the 59-year-old’s cultural imprint carries on.
In StockX’s culture index report for 2022, Murakami earned the number-two placement for art prints, behind Obey founder and street artist Shepard Fairey.
On the sneaker side, Jordan continues to lead the top brands for StockX with the Air Jordan I sneaker being the top silhouette in total trades for the fourth year in a row. Nike followed Jordan in both brand ranking and top silhouettes. The Nike Dunk increased four places to take the number-two spot in top silhouettes — the biggest year-over-year jump — followed by the Nike Air Force I sneaker.
Adidas, New Balance and Converse rounded out StockX’s top five brands in 2021, while others like Bape, Reebok and Crocs showed promise on the platform. Crocs alone maintained an average price premium of 98 percent for the year.
Supreme remained the leader in apparel with an average price premium of 60 percent above retail, followed by Fear of God, Vlone, which climbed five spots, Cactus Jack, which fell two spots, and Nike landing fifth. The Yeezy x Gap blue hoodie and black jacket led the top collaborations for the year, followed by Supreme’s collaborations with Emilio Pucci and Tiffany. Telfar moved up 18 spots to reach the top 10 most-traded apparel and accessory brands.

In the year ahead, StockX believes everything from books to sports like tennis, racing, gaming and golf will take center stage.

Fashion and Beer? Fashion Brands Are Looking to Brewing Companies for Their Latest Collaborations

Fashion and Beer? Fashion Brands Are Looking to Brewing Companies for Their Latest Collaborations

The fashion world is no stranger to the unexpected collaboration, with brands regularly teaming with companies across multiple industries.While this year has seen several fashion brands and designers delve into the wine industry, other brands are going in on the beer world with new collaborations for streetwear apparel, athleisure and footwear.
Here, WWD looks at some of the most recent collaborations between fashion brands and brewing companies. Read on for more.
Modelo

A campaign image from the Modelo x 424 co-branded capsule collection.
Courtesy of Modelo

Mexican beer company Modelo is taking aim at the streetwear market with its co-branded clothing collaboration with premium streetwear and design stores across the U.S. The company’s first collection, which dropped on Aug. 26, is created with 424’s founder Guillermo Andrade and includes bandanas, jeans and a range of upcycled shirts that feature both companies’ logos.

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“Modelo has an edge that we’ve found translates well through the vision of iconic streetwear designers who want to create fashion-forward apparel with the brand that excites our shared audiences,” said Rene Ramos, vice president of field, lifestyle and experiential marketing at Constellation Brands, the company exclusively brewing, importing and marketing Modelo beers in the U.S.
Modelo is continuing the initiative with more streetwear collections that will drop through the end of the year. The company will be working with KidSuper’s founder and designer Colm Dillane in New York; Centre TX in Austin, Texas;  RSVP Gallery in Chicago, and Unknwn in Miami.
M.Gemi

M.Gemi’s collaboration with Peroni.
Kate Haus Photography

To celebrate their shared Italian heritage, shoe brand M.Gemi and beer company Peroni teamed for a capsule collection of sneakers released on Aug. 24. The white sneakers are handmade in Italy and feature a blue leather detailing and a small red Peroni flag. The shoes retail for $228 and are available in men’s and women’s sizing on M.Gemi’s website.
Starter

Pieces from Starter’s Budweiser collaboration.
Courtesy of Starter

Iconix Brand Group-owned apparel brand Starter celebrated its 50th anniversary in August by teaming with several global brands, including Budweiser and Coca-Cola, for a capsule collection. The collection includes pieces that reflect iconic moments from the last 50 years, such as Coke teaching the world to sing on a hilltop and Budweiser’s Bud Bowl.
Starter, best-known in the sports world for its jackets, kicked off the collaboration in January with a collection of T-shirts, sweatshirts, jackets and hats designed with Budweiser’s red and white colorway and logo. The pieces are available on the brand’s website and range in price from $35 to $170.
Pacifico x Obey Clothing

Styles from the Pacifico x Obey Clothing collection
Courtesy

Beer company Pacifico is teaming with Obey Clothing for a line of eco-friendly merchandise releasing on Aug. 30. The merchandise collection includes T-shirts and tote bags that feature illustrations of Pacifico’s logo. The brand is donating 100 percent of proceeds from the collection to Surfrider Foundation, an organization that helps protect and preserve the world’s oceans.
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Maserati Teams Up With Streetwear Giant Hiroshi Fujiwara for Two Limited-Edition Ghibli Sedans

Maserati Teams Up With Streetwear Giant Hiroshi Fujiwara for Two Limited-Edition Ghibli Sedans

Maserati is upping its street cred.

The century-old nameplate has joined forces with “the godfather of street culture,” Hiroshi Fujiwara, to create two bold new riffs on the Ghibli.
The limited editions were built with the marque’s Fuoriserie customization program, which enables collectors to create bespoke four-wheelers tailored to their specific tastes. In this case, Fujiwara, a noted artist, musician, producer and designer, put his spin on the luxury sports sedan by imbuing his signature streetwear aesthetic.

The end result is a pair of minimalist and monochrome Maseratis known as Operanera and Operabianca. Like yin and yang, one Ghibli features a gleaming black exterior while the other incorporates glossy white paint.

The unique grille sports the Fragment logo and the Maserati trident. 

Aldo Ferrero/Maserati

In the spirit of itanji—a Japanese term signifying the marriage of Italian design with Japanese perfection—the Trident’s elegant visual codes are balanced with Fujiwara’s pared-back yet precise styling. Each car also features a spate of references to Fujiwara’s streetwear label Fragment which he founded in 2003. The Fragment logo can be found on the C pillar and the unique grille which Maserati says embodies Fujiwara’s “metropolitan style.”
Inside, the uniformity of color continues and sees black leather and Alcantara seats emblazoned with the Fragment name and Maserati trident. There’s also a special alphanumeric tag that runs underneath the triple side air ducts. It reads “M157110519FRG”; the first four characters reflect the Ghibli ID code, the following four reference the date of Fujiwara’s first meeting with Maserati (November 5, 2019), and the last three are another tribute to Fragment.
Maserati didn’t share what’s under the hood, though the Ghibli can be equipped with either a 3.0-liter V-6 or 3.8-liter V-8 that churns out 345 hp and 580 hp, respectively. Both cars are also fitted with 20-inch matte black Urano wheels for added attitude.
Limited to just 175, Fujiwara’s Ghiblis will be accompanied by a collaborative capsule collection in the same “unconventional spirit” as the cars. Prices and details are still to come, but you can expect plenty of Fujiwara’s trademark swag.
Check out more photos below:

Aldo Ferrero/Maserati

Aldo Ferrero/Maserati

Aldo Ferrero/Maserati

Aldo Ferrero/Maserati

Aldo Ferrero/Maserati

Maserati

Maserati

Maserati

Golden Goose Taps Stellar Cast for Streetwear Collection Launch

Golden Goose Taps Stellar Cast for Streetwear Collection Launch

MILAN — Golden Goose wants to inspire its consumers with the launch of the Star streetwear line.
For the debut of the new collection, the Italian company has created a series of content featuring a high-profile, diverse cast.
Golden Goose’s Star crew includes musician, model, fashion designer and son of Stevie Wonder Kailand Morris; actress, writer, photographer, director and fashion fixture Tommy Dorfman; transgender model and dancer Leyna Bloom; Langley Fox, an illustrator, model and great-granddaughter of Ernest Hemingway, and Los Angeles-based Italian influencer, actress, writer and activist Marta Pozzan.
The talent was all filmed in New York, caught in activities that make them feel upbeat and that have a positive impact on other people.

Asking them the question “What makes you a star?,” Golden Goose said in a statement that with the campaign it wanted to show that “being a star is not related to fame and notoriety. It’s about being driven, feeling centered, shining bright and inspiring other people to do so. It’s about making a positive impact through simple daily actions that everyone can do to make the world a better place.”
In keeping with this inspirational vision, the brand, for example, lensed Morris playing drums with strangers in the streets of Brooklyn. “Music is a part of my DNA, it’s something I know can help people, something I know can change the world for the better…and that kind of giving back…can be done at anytime, in any location,” he said. “I’m known for being a model, an entrepreneur, a fashion designer…but I also think there’s nothing greater than the gift of music.” Morris previously modeled in a campaign for Dior Men’s Modern Tailoring collection after having interned at the brand with Kim Jones in the summer of 2019.

In another episode of the Star series, Dorfman, who rose to fame playing the role of Ryan Shaver in Netflix’s “13 Reasons Why” and appeared in a range of campaigns for Calvin Klein, Fendi, Diesel and Ugg, bakes surrounded by friends in a kitchen. “I actually love baking for people I care about,” Dorfman said. “It’s so immediate and intimate…making food for others. You put your time and effort into this thing that you know will go away. Making and sharing food is, at its heart, like curating an experience…hopefully a positive one.”
Pozzan, meanwhile, is captured talking to a stranger sitting on a bench at the park; Fox is shown planting flowers, bringing natural beauty to the city, and Bloom, who made her acting debut in Danielle Lessovitz’s “Port Authority,” is filmed taking portraits of her friends.

Leyna Bloom in Golden Goose “Star” campaign. 
Courtesy of Golden Goose

“People don’t know this about me…but I love photographing my friends. How I bring their energy from out of them is what matters. I’m constantly trying to capture their essence. Whether it’s against the backdrop of the city, or a wall of graffiti on a vacant building…there’s so much dimension you can bring out of your subject,” said Bloom, who first attracted attention as a figure of New York’s ballroom scene at the House of Miyake-Mugler.
She was the first transgender woman of color to appear in an issue of Vogue India and in 2018 became the only transgender model to walk at Paris Fashion Week for Zendaya’s collaboration with Tommy Hilfiger.

“I think everybody has star qualities and sometimes something as simple as a beautiful photo can help someone see who they are. 
It’s powerful because when you love someone, you know there are certain essences about them that the world doesn’t see, that you see because you’ve had meaningful moments with them. Capturing that vulnerability and capturing that essence…it says, ‘Hey. Look at you, look how beautiful you are…this is how I see you and this is how the world around you sees you, so don’t ever forget that.’
 Taking photos for me has always been healing. I was born in a world where my visuals and my image weren’t appreciated. I want people to see that I’m here and when I do that with my friends, I want to remind them that they are also here.”
Hitting the Golden Goose online shop and some of its boutiques today, the Star collection includes high-end tracksuits crafted with Italian triacetate injected with a ’70s retro vibe. Defined by starred grosgrain bands running down the sleeves and the legs, the tracksuits combine a classic zippered sweatshirt with pants available in two fits, with wide or tapered legs. The lineup also features gray cotton crewneck sweatshirts and shorts embellished with laminated stars; logo T-shirts and hoodies, as well as a selection of accessories, spanning from beanies and baseball caps to socks, backpacks and nylon windbreakers.
The Star collection, which in June will also be available at a number of multibrand shops and department stores worldwide, retails at between $95 for T-shirts and $540 for the tracksuits to $680 for the sweatshirts punctuated by crystals.
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Streetwear Enthusiasts Flock to Supreme Milan Store Despite COVID-19 Restrictions

Streetwear Enthusiasts Flock to Supreme Milan Store Despite COVID-19 Restrictions

MILAN — About 150 cool kids in their teens and 20s gathered outside the Supreme store in Milan Thursday morning ahead of the official opening at 11 a.m. CET sharp.
A sample of Italy’s streetwear community, many wearing their Nike x Sacai and Air Jordans sneakers, holding skateboards in their hands and clad in at least one Supreme item, flooded the small square adjoining the store on Corso Garibaldi 20.
Not everybody was actually able to enter the store. Due in part to COVID-19-related containment measures, shoppers were required to enter a raffle online to secure a chance to shop, but this didn’t prevent brand enthusiasts from congregating in the surrounding streets and bars to witness the opening event.

One man in his 30s, who goes by the nickname Yazou, was traveling in Milan and was among those who didn’t win the raffle but stopped by anyway.
“I was hoping to buy the Box logo T-shirt this time. I’m no longer buying that many Supreme pieces to be honest because I think the soul of the brand has vanished a bit,” he offered, clad in floral Supreme trousers crafted from a vintage Ralph Lauren fabric. “Back in 2016 when they opened in Paris, it was still cool with all the artists’ collabs, but then it turned into a brand for rich kids.”

Yazou, a French guy in his 30s, was in Milan for the opening of the Supreme store. 
Martino Carrera/WWD

One of the streetwear brand’s most sought-after items, the so-called Box logo is Supreme’s signature white T-shirt bearing the logo superimposed on a red background. Coinciding with each new store opening, the streetwear brand releases a special version — this time featuring the image of Leonardo Da Vinci’s “The Last Supper,” the mural painting treasured at the refectory of Milan’s Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie.

Francesco Marchi, a 21-year-old law student, was hoping to buy the T-shirt, describing it as the most collectible piece. “Since I discovered the brand in 2014 in New York I’ve been buying something every year, I wear them a lot but also know that they have a value in the secondary market,” he said.
When 27-year-old Andrea Fraschi, a Milan-based architect that was the first to make a purchase at the store on Thursday morning, came out, his shopping bags filled with Supreme items, a large crowd gathered around him to take pictures as he proudly showed off the T-shirt.
By mid-afternoon, the T-shirt was available on popular resale platform StockX for $468. It originally retailed for 44 euros, or $53 at current exchange rates.

Andrea Fraschi scooped up the Supreme’s Box logo T-shirt dedicated to the Milan store opening. 
Martino Carrera/WWD

“I’ve been collecting Supreme stuff since 2013, around the time when I started developing a passion for the streetwear scene, graffiti art and the brand, of course,” Fraschi told WWD. He added it’s always hard to buy online as pieces fly off immediately so whenever he has a chance, he stops by the brand’s retail units worldwide to scoop up a new piece. This time he took home a denim suit in addition to the T-shirt and a skateboard deck — although he has never practiced skateboarding.
Zheng Xin, a Chinese art student in Turin, traveled all the way to Milan to buy some hoodies, but she said she’s not really into the traditional logoed pieces. “I’ve started collecting Supreme only two years ago, but I’m really drawn to their easy flair, it’s very fashionable but laid-back,” she said.

The Milan unit is only the second store Supreme opens in continental Europe, after Paris, which was unveiled in 2016. The brand also operates a door in London’s Soho, in addition to flagships in the U.S. and Japan.

The scene at the Supreme’s Milan store’s opening on May 6. 
Martino Carrera/WWD

The brand has been at the center of a trademark dispute in Italy over the past few years with local counterfeiters. In 2019, Italy’s Corte di Cassazione, the country’s equivalent of the Supreme Court, ruled in favor of New York’s Supreme.
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EXCLUSIVE: Nike Swim Launches First Sustainable Swimwear Collection

EXCLUSIVE: Nike Swim Launches First Sustainable Swimwear Collection

Nike Swim is dipping its toes into sustainable swimwear with the launch of the Icon Collection, the swim brand’s first sustainable line. 
“We know that it’s kind of table stakes at this point to have sustainability in your product. But for this [line], we did kind of take it to the highest level across the entire collection,” Brianna Showell, vice president of marketing at Nike Swim, a division of Nike Inc., told WWD. “That’s one thing that we’re really proud of.”
She’s referring to the men’s and women’s swimwear collection that’s made with 85 percent or more sustainable fabrics and trims, including recycled lining and jerseys.  

Nike Swim launches the Icon Collection, the brand’s first swimwear line made from mostly sustainable fabrics. 
Courtesy Photo

The introductory assortment, consisting of about 25 pieces, includes one-piece bathing suits, midkinis, two-piece separates and men’s trunks in splashy neons, color-blocked cutouts and Nike logo patterns. It looks a bit more like streetwear than beachwear for some. But Kelly Hibler, president of Nike Swim, said that’s the point. 

The collection isn’t just for swimming, he said. It’s for “in-and-around-the-water” activities.
“You want to be able to wear what you have, and sometimes that means I’m going to wear it to the beach, and when I get to the beach, I want to take off my sweatshirt and go dive in the water and I don’t want to worry about changing,” Hibler said. “And sometimes I want to leave the beach and be able to go to a place to sit outside and have something to eat, and talk about the day spent in motion. So swimwear is a fun way to be able to connect through consumers’ lives that way.”

Pieces from Nike Swim’s Icon Collection. 
Courtesy Photo

Meanwhile, all of Nike Inc. continues to grow, despite the pandemic and the recent political storm in China over Xinjiang cotton. Nike Swim executives wouldn’t comment on the situation abroad, except to say that “Nike Swim is committed to growth in Asia,” Hibler said. “While still in its early stages, we see it as a future accelerant to our business.” 
But Nike Swim is just one of many swimwear brands that had record sales during the course of the pandemic. In fact, the business is on track to have its best year ever. In the last 12 months, sales in the Nike Swim North American business surged 36 percent, year-over-year, while the women’s division jumped 17 percent during the same time period. Globally, Nike Swim revenues are expected to be up 30 percent, year-over-year, for the period between June 2020 and May 2021. 
“COVID-19 has really awakened people’s desire to get back in the water,” Hibler said. “And when you think about that — just the difficulty of buying Nike Swim is hard [because stores were temporarily closed.] And that’s also during a time when most pools have been closed, and lockdowns. But people have found a way to keep water as part of their life and that’s super exciting.
“Much of the growth is from nearly doubling the business in Europe, including new distributorships and current partners broadening their assortments, adding the new men’s and women’s Icon line,” he continued. “The Icon line opened opportunities with new retailers.
“We have a continued focus on growing the women’s business,” Hibler added. “We know our female consumers demand both performance and style and we are committed to serving them across our product line. The Icon line specifically addresses our target consumer’s love for sport-inspired bold swim style.”

Nike Swim’s Icon Collection. 
Courtesy Photo

The collection is also geared toward the “Phenom consumer,” or 18-to-25-year-olds, slightly younger than Nike’s regular clientele. 
It’s that consumer, Showell said, shoppers that are often grouped in the Gen Z category, that is increasingly concerned with social topics, such as sustainability and inclusivity — and is willing to pay for it.  
“What is important to them is really the transparency and authenticity in both the actual creation of the product, but also in the marketing [and] equality, around inclusivity, health and wellness, sustainability and really just their love for street style,” Showell said. “They’re young, creative, ambitious, forward-thinking trendsetters and we really wanted to serve their needs with this collection and [go] a little bit younger than we had in terms of our design inspiration.” 

Kelly Hibler, president of Nike Swim, said the Icon Collection isn’t just for swimming. It can be worn as street style as well. 
Courtesy Photo

Nike Swim, which is licensed and developed by Perry Ellis International, Inc., is offering the Icon Collection in sizes XS to XXL. Prices range from $40 to $80. The collection launches in the U.S. today at Nike stores, as well as internationally at nike.com, rolling out to other brick-and-mortar retailers later this month, including Asos in June.

The Attico Approaches Streetwear With Genderless Capsule

The Attico Approaches Streetwear With Genderless Capsule

MILAN — The Attico is approaching the world of streetwear.
The Milan-based brand, founded and designed by digital entrepreneurs Gilda Ambrosio and Giorgia Tordini, on Tuesday will unveil “Life at Large,” a genderless capsule collection focused on cool street attires.
The capsule hits stores this week and is part of the brand’s new strategy, which, as The Attico chief executive officer Stefano Marcovaldi, revealed last summer, now includes the unveiling of two main collections a year and of a range of capsules that can be focused on different product categories.
“For the first capsule, we started with ready-to-wear,” Tordini explained. “We wanted to step out of our comfort zone to create something very different, but that includes details and codes that are very signature of the brand.”

Although the designers employed mainly cotton, nylon, jersey and Neoprene — instead of the usual silks feathers and sequins — they actually couldn’t forgo some feminine touches, for example transforming a classic T-shirt into a draped, asymmetric top to match with coordinated baggy fleece pants. While oversize hoodies, joggers and maxishirts with applied pockets took center stage, Tordini and Ambrosio also created a T-shirt dress with padded shoulders and a drawstring putting the focus on the waist, as well as a draped miniskirt, all crafted from Neoprene.

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Along with solid tones of gray, chocolate brown, black and military green, the brand introduced three patterns. One features the letters composing the name The Attico reshuffled for an abstract motif, another shows an allover print of the brand’s logo creating a camouflage-inspired pattern and the third echoes the color effects of thermo-sensitive fabrics.
“We designed this collection with Milan’s cool kids in mind. I think it offers products that people feel like wearing now, thanks to the sense of comfort and relaxation that we tried to infuse into them,” Ambrosio said.
Carrying a full merchandising offering, the capsule also includes yoga sets, shoes, including flat sandals with chunky soles and mules with comfortable pyramid-shaped heels, as well as socks, caps, bags and eyewear developed in collaboration with Linda Farrow. 
The Attico’s new streetwear capsule.  Courtesy of The Attico

In order to showcase the versatility and inclusivity of the capsule, The Attico created a customized campaign, which involved 18 talents. The brand actually posted on its social media accounts a casting call. “We received 3,500 emails,” said Tordini, explaining that out of them, they selected 40 boys and girls whom they personally met at The Attico headquarters in Milan. “We talked to them, we asked them about their lives and their passions, it has been really fun, but also moving,” Ambrosio said.
The designer selected a group of 18, who are the protagonists of the images that The Attico will use to promote the collection, but also of mini videos where they will share their own feelings and points of view.
In addition, following the official release of the collection, The Attico will start an event on booming social media platform Clubhouse, opening a room where Ambrosio and Tordini will moderate on Feb. 23 at 5:30 p.m. a conversation among the talents appearing in the campaign. 

The “Life at Large” capsule will be available at The Attico’s online stores, as well as at about 200 international retailers.
“Our established partners were enthusiastic of this new street capsule, which also opened up the doors of other retailers which we started collaborating with,” said Ambrosio, highlighting that this range is complementary to the brand’s signature cocktail and evening offering. “Usually we dress women from six o’clock to sunrise,” she said. “With this capsule, we are giving our consumers new items to sport during the day, completing our lifestyle vision.”
The Attico will release another capsule in March, while the brand’s fall 2021 collection will hit stores between June and September.
See also:
Jordan Joins Forces With The Attico for Women’s Apparel Launch in Italy
The Attico to Skip Milan Fashion Week
Pomellato Launches First Capsule Collection

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