Sports Car

Donkervoort’s Insane Hot Rods Are Finally Coming to the US

Donkervoort’s Insane Hot Rods Are Finally Coming to the US

Donkervoort is ready to cross the Atlantic.

The Dutch automaker has announced that it will finally begin selling its hand-built and ultra-light sports cars in the US. The first model that will be available stateside is quite possibly the company’s most capable: the D8 GTO Individual Series.
Although it was founded in 1978, Donkervoort’s stripped-down, enthusiast-friendly vehicles have never been available to buy in the US before. But entering the US market has been a long-term goal for the marque’s managing director, Denis Donkervoort, who studied marketing and management at Florida’s Northwood University in 2008, according to the brand. And now, thanks to a partnership with Bespoke Imports Group, which will sell and service the automaker’s cars in the US, it’s finally happening.

US-Spec Donkervoort D8 GTO Individual Series 

Donkervoort

“Our entry into the US took time because we needed to guarantee our partner had the same ideals of extreme customer service and customization that we demand, and we could only do this with a partner like the Bespoke Imports Group,” the Donkervoort executive said in a statement. “Fortunately, now Americans can experience the kind of driving purity we could only deliver to Europe up until now.”
Donkervoort’s vehicles are basically the European version of an hot rod. In order to live up to the company’s “No Compromise” motto, each car is designed to be a no-frills speed machine that delivers the purest driving experience possible. This is especially true of the first model that will be available in the US, the D8 GTO Individual. The long-nosed grand tourer weighs less than 1,500 pounds and is powered by an Audi Sport-sourced turbocharged inline-five that can spit out over 400 horses and rocket the car from zero to 60 mph in 2.7 seconds and to 124 mph in 7.7 seconds. The vehicle, which can be customized to your heart’s content, starts at $240,000.

Donkervoort

There’s currently a two-year waiting list for Donkervoort vehicles in Europe, but interested American customers won’t have to wait nearly as long. In preparation for today’s announcement, the company started setting aside cars for US customers. You’ll still want to move quickly, though. Three are already already spoken for and the marque has been getting inquiries from America for some time now.

Don’t worry if you miss out on the company’s first batch of cars for the US, though. It promises “far bigger things” are still to come.
Click here to see all the photos of the US-Spec Donkervoort D8 GTO Individual Series.

US-Spec Donkervoort D8 GTO Individual Series 

Donkervoort

Watch the Porsche 911 Hybrid Run Laps at Nürburgring (Again)

Watch the Porsche 911 Hybrid Run Laps at Nürburgring (Again)

It’s no longer a question of if a hybrid Porsche 911 is coming, but when.

The answer might be pretty soon if a new video from YouTuber Automotive Mike is any hint. The clip, which was uploaded to YouTube this weekend, shows what is believed to be the 911 hybrid prototype undergoing testing at Germany’s legendary Nürburgring race track.
In the video, you can see the lightly camouflaged 911 getting a run out. We don’t know what kind of speeds it was able to hit, but it looks to be traveling at a pretty decent clip. The footage also offers a peek of some potential body modifications, including a dual-exhaust system in the back and an all-new front bumper that appears to have active aero elements.

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Porsche did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
Nothing in the video comes as a complete shock, of course. Earlier this year, Porsche Italia’s Pietro Innocenti confirmed that a hybrid 911 was on its way. Although he wouldn’t say when exactly it would arrive, he did say it could be before 2024. And last November, footage surfaced showing a similar prototype undergoing testing at the Nürburgring.
While purists may find the idea of a hybrid 911 dismaying—some still haven’t gotten over the introduction of a water-cooled engine back in 1998—Porsche has already shown it can build a successful hybrid, like the Panamera and Cayenne. The brand has made clear that a potential electrified 911, which would likely be called the Turbo-E Hybrid, would prioritize performance over efficiency.
Although the hybrid may be here soon, a fully electric 911 isn’t on the horizon at this point. Back in 2020, CEO Oliver Blume said that the 911 is a “car prepared for internal combustion engines, and it’s not useful to combine it with pure electric mobility.” So, for now, sports car converts to the electric revolution will have to stick to the popular Taycan if they want to remain loyal to Porsche.

This Ultra-Rare, Ultra-Yellow ’73 Porsche 911 Carrera Could Fetch $1 Million at Auction

This Ultra-Rare, Ultra-Yellow ’73 Porsche 911 Carrera Could Fetch $1 Million at Auction

Classic-car enthusiasts, alert your accountants: An extremely rare 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7 Lightweight is about to go on sale for the first time since it was originally acquired.

The yellow-and-black sports car was one of just 200 Lightweight versions made that year, and the RS 2.7 was the first 911 to feature both the “Carrera” and “RS” designations. RM Sotheby’s is putting the vehicle up for auction on May 14 in Monaco, where it’s expected to hammer down for $850,000 to $1 million.

The RS 2.7 comes equipped with a 2.7-liter flat-six engine, Bosch fuel injection and low-friction Nikasil cylinder coatings, contributing to its 210 hp and 188 ft lbs of torque. On the exterior, you’ll see wider wings, a redesigned front bumper, and a ducktail—the first factory spoiler attached to the rear end of a 911.

The 1973 Carrera RS 2.7 Lightweight features one of the first Porsche ducktails on a 911. 

Paolo Carlini ©2022 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

To live up to the Lightweight name, this model used thinner steel for the body, thinner glass for the windows, lighter fiberglass bumpers and racing seats. A less hefty version of the Porsche crest was even created for the front of the RS 2.7. And rather than downsizing certain features, some were taken out altogether, including the sun visors, radio and rear seats, among other interior fittings.
The anonymous current—and only—owner of the RS 2.7 was enamored by the sports car when it was first released but had a difficult time finding one in Italy, where they lived. So, they traveled to Germany especially to buy the vehicle, and haven’t given it up until now.
The Porsche is up for auction with its original light-yellow exterior over a black interior, although the owner did personalize the car a bit over the years. Their changes include a black finish on the exterior mirror and an M472 lock on the rear engine lid.

Straddling the line between a race car and road car, the RS 2.7 also features matching-numbers chassis, engine and transmission. If you’ve ever wanted to own a piece of Porsche history—and a relatively well preserved one at that—this is a good opportunity to buy in.

First Drive: Ferrari’s First V-6-Powered Production Car Inhales the Track Like a Beast

First Drive: Ferrari’s First V-6-Powered Production Car Inhales the Track Like a Beast

Surely, the thinking always went, a Ferrari that rolled off the line with a V-6 engine, a power plant common in Camrys and Kias, would signal the end times for Maranello. Yet the 819 hp Ferrari 296 Gran Turismo Berlinetta (GTB)—not just the marque’s first V-6-powered production car, but a plug-in hybrid V-6 production car—is a cracking start to a new age. More than that, it’s a revelation, and not only because of the way it inhales sections of track like a far heavier-breathing beast.

Ferrari built its early legacy on cars with 12-cylinder bravado up front, but it’s had great motorsport success placing a V-6 behind the cockpit, introduced with the Targa Florio–winning 246 SP in 1961; that same year, Ferrari took the Formula 1 Drivers’ and Constructors’ Championships with the six-cylinder 156 “Sharknose.” (Then, of course, there was the road-going Dino, which debuted in 1967 with a 2.0-liter V-6 making 178 hp, but those cars were never officially branded with the Prancing Horse badge until the later eight-cylinder versions.)

Hybrid? Yes. V-6? Yes. Crazy Ferrari performance? Oh yes. 

Lorenzo Marcinno

As with many of Ferrari’s motorsport champions, the 296 GTB enjoys the stability and balance of a mid-rear-engine layout. Its twin turbochargers are nestled in the 120-degree gap between cylinder banks with the exhaust sitting on top, a “hot-vee” configuration that cuts weight, lowers the center of gravity and improves output. The 165 hp electric motor ( juiced by a 7.5 kwh battery) sits between the engine and the eight-speed dual-clutch transmission; with the 654 hp from the 2.9-liter mill, total output is 109 hp more than the F8 Tributo. And with a $318,000 price tag that runs roughly $40K above that car, the 296 GTB is certainly no entry-level model. Nor is it some transitional footnote in the interregnum between mechanical and all-electric—not when Cristiano Pompucci, Ferrari 296 GTB Power Train Project lead, refers to it as “the next chapter in the history of our sports berlinettas.”
Of course, the automaker had some unasked-for help writing this particular chapter, with Pompucci acknowledging that the car was a direct response to Europe’s newest emissions regulations. But quash any thoughts of compromise, or the 296 GTB will quash them for you.

The 3,241-pound (dry weight) model is among the nimblest in Ferrari’s stable, with balletic handling owed in large part to the 102.3-inch wheelbase, shortest in the current lineup. The hybrid system’s continuous power delivery erases turbo lag and allows the six-shooter to fire from zero to 60 mph in an estimated 2.9 seconds, devouring the main straight of Spain’s Monteblanco Circuit along the way. Engaging the brake-by-wire system—the hefty calipers are shared by the SF90 Stradale—in conjunction with the new ABS Evo assist and Ferrari’s six-way Chassis Dynamic Sensor brings the machine from 124 mph to a standstill in 351 feet, besting the lighter F8 by nearly 33 feet. Along with the active rear spoiler, which deploys for up to 220 additional pounds of downforce, this makes the 2.76-mile circuit’s hairpins far less hairy.

A closer look at the Ferrari 296 Gran Turismo Berlinetta. 

Lorenzo Marcinno

Off the track, while exploring the countryside outside Seville, the GTB demonstrates its grand-touring prowess. It’s here that the eDrive and Hybrid modes excel. Accelerating from a stoplight under full electric power, I pass a small funeral procession making its way down a side street. The car is respectful in its silence, with the ability to remain decoupled from the engine for 15 miles. Less impressive: the interior’s underwhelming JBL sound system, lacking the souped-up audio of some other OEM-supplied setups, and the diminutive infotainment screen, both of which feel uninspired. And traditionalists will surely bristle at the all-digital dash, though it suits the vehicle’s nod to the future and I for one am thankful for the head-up display.
No matter how great the car, the biggest hurdle Ferrari may need to clear is the perception that its latest release is the result of procrastination, with the marque having vacillated on its messaging regarding pure EVs. One Ferrarista, who owns the 458 and F8, worries that despite its claimed 2025 target date, “Ferrari will hit late in the all-electric fight and get a black eye.” But this model is a demonstration of what the automaker can do in spite of restrictions, not because of them. And with its ferocious performance, beautiful proportions and grand-touring comfort, the 296 GTB feels like Enzo himself saying, “Bring it on.”

Purists, Rejoice! The 2023 Toyota Supra Will Be Available As a Stick Shift

Purists, Rejoice! The 2023 Toyota Supra Will Be Available As a Stick Shift

Toyota just gave enthusiasts another reason to love the Supra.

The Japanese auto giant has announced a six-speed manual gearbox will be available as an option on the 2023 edition of its iconic sports car. Now, if you opt for the more powerful version of the vehicle, the pleasure of shifting through the gears can be yours and yours alone.
The news, which performance diehards have been waiting for since Toyota brought back the nameplate in 2020, doesn’t come as a complete shock. Two weeks ago, the automaker finally confirmed that the Supra would be available with a stick shift again. Unfortunately, it won’t be available on all Supras, just those powered by the BMW-sourced turbocharged 3.0-liter inline-six. The mill produces the same power—382 hp and 368 ft-lbs of torque—regardless of which type of transmission it’s connected to, but the six-speed manual offers a shorter final drive ratio and rev-matching, which can be turned off.

The 2023 Supra A-91 MT’s manual gear shifter 

Toyota

The manual will be offered on three Supra models, the 3.0, 3.0 Premium and the limited-edition A91-MT. Only 500 examples of the last variant will be sold in the US and only as part of the 2023 model year. It comes in either matte white or gray and features an exclusive Cognac leather interior, a “GR” logo Alcantara shift knob, a 12-speaker JBL sound system (which also comes standard on the 3.0 Premium), 19-inch alloy wheels and special red brake calipers and “Supra” badging.
All 2023 Supras, regardless of transmission, come with a revised suspension and power steering system, as well as a new feature called “Hairpin+,” designed to make sharp turns a breeze if you ever find yourself in the midst of a car chase on a windy mountain road. Manual-specific changes include recalibration of the traction- and braking-control systems, as well as adjustments to the shape of the center console made so you don’t bang your hand against the control panel when you’re shifting between third and fourth gears.

Toyota

It should be noted that the 2023 Supra isn’t the only car available with a manual gearbox. Porsche announced it comes as standard equipment on the new Porsche 911 Sport Classic on Wednesday. But the cars with stick shifts are definitely few and far between. Last year, The New York Times reported that just one percent of the cars produced for sale in the US had manual transmissions, compared to 35 percent in 1980. The decline makes sense when you consider that only 18 percent of US drivers say they can even drive a stick shift.

Despite this, Toyota is doing what it can to keep manuals alive. The new Supra is one of a trio of models the brand currently offers in the US with the feature, joining the sporty GR86 and the less fashionable Corolla (yes, the Corolla). Earlier this year, the company also patented a system for EVs that would simulate the feel of going through the gears with a fake pedal and shifter.

Toyota

Toyota clearly isn’t ready to give up just yet.

A 1-of-2 Remake of the 1962 Jaguar E-Type ‘Low-Drag’ Racer Is up for Sale

A 1-of-2 Remake of the 1962 Jaguar E-Type ‘Low-Drag’ Racer Is up for Sale

Back in 1961, Jaguar’s iconic E-type model debuted at the Geneva Auto Salon. A dozen lightweight, low-drag versions of the racers were later released in 1963 in the hopes of giving Ferrari stiff competition in the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Those ultra-rare editions have been nearly impossible to find over the years, but a new recreation may turn one collector’s dream into reality.

UK-based classic car dealer Will Stone Historic Cars is offering a pristine remake of the 1962 aerodynamic E-type racer. Built over a four-year period by Jaguar specialist Lynx, it is one of just two known examples in existence.

Front profile view of the E-Type remake. 

Sam Frost/Courtesy of Will Stone Historic Cars

The first iteration of the E-type’s low-drag body was used on a 1962 prototype built by the marque’s Experimental Department. It was shelved to create a more lightweight version in 1963 that saw all 12 special editions built by hand with aluminum bodies for a slippery drag effect. The car is powered by an upgraded Crosthwaite & Gardiner engine with an alloy cylinder block, a Lucas slide-throttle fuel injection and a Lynx T5 five-speed gearbox. The 350 hp mill, which also features a revised combustion chamber, camshafts and variable-length exhaust, push the speed machine to a still-impressive 174 mph.
As a race car, the E-Type saw mixed results. Though the car was able to beat Ferrari GTOs at short distances, the low-drag models failed to take the checkered flag during the endurance classics. The limited-series’ highest achievement is credited to noted Jaguar racer Dick Protheroe. Driving the 1962 prototype of the low-drag E-type, he won against stiff GTO competition in Reims, France in a race of 25 laps.

The Jaguar E-Type Low Drag with dual exhausts at the rear. 

Sam Frost/Courtesy of Will Stone Historic Cars

Of course, the car’s biggest achievement may not have anything to do with its race record. Enzo Ferrari famously called the Jaguar E-Type “the most beautiful car ever made.” No small compliment coming from Ferrari himself.
The 1962 E-Type “Low-Drag” remake is now available for $458,826. Visit the car dealer’s website for more details on the listing, and check out more images below.

Profile shot of the racer with lifted hood and the exposed engine. 

Sam Frost/Courtesy of Will Stone Historic Cars

Sam Frost/Courtesy of Will Stone Historic Cars

Sam Frost/Courtesy of Will Stone Historic Cars

Sam Frost/Courtesy of Will Stone Historic Cars

Sam Frost/Courtesy of Will Stone Historic Cars

Sam Frost/Courtesy of Will Stone Historic Cars

Sam Frost/Courtesy of Will Stone Historic Cars

Inside Ferrari’s Invite-Only ‘Cavalcade,’ a 4-Day Road Rally of Prancing Horses

Inside Ferrari’s Invite-Only ‘Cavalcade,’ a 4-Day Road Rally of Prancing Horses

It must be galling to buy your first new Ferrari, only to discover that the purchase of your $300,000 car unlocks just the initial level of privilege and access within the world of the Prancing Horse elite. The climb up Ferrari’s customer ladder is long, winding and extremely costly, requiring the acquisition of multiple examples of the marque’s rarest and most expensive models—by invitation only, of course—and participation in some of the inventive ways the brand has for you to spend money with it, such as the Challenge race series or the F1 Clienti track-car program.

The annual—and ultra-exclusive—parade of Prancing Horses, where residents come out of their homes to help celebrate the marque. 

Courtesy of Ferrari

And the top rung of that ladder? It just may be Cavalcade, an annual four-day road rally organized by Ferrari in a different Italian region each year. It costs nearly $30,000 per car, and that’s just the start. Shipping your vehicle to Italy, which might cost just as much, is on you—note that some of your fellow participants will fly in both an open-air model for sunshine and another, with a roof, in case of rain—as is covering additional rooms for your entourage. For the hard-core Ferrari obsessives, none of this is a deterrent: In mid-September, the private aviation terminal closest to the hotel for this year’s event in Sicily was booked solid.

Classic and rare Ferrari models seen on the streets of Italy during Cavalcade. 

Courtesy of Ferrari

But before you start readying your bank transfer, you’ll first need to be invited. For some, it’s the invitation of the year; Reno De Paoli, Ferrari’s global head of marketing, says some clients organize their entire summers around Cavalcade, and after piloting a humble 812 GTS in this year’s rally I understand why. Seeing a single Monza or LaFerrari in the wild is an event in itself, but with Cavalcade you’re part of a steroidal convoy of 100 of Ferrari’s rarest modern cars, along with 50 iconic classics, over some of Italy’s best driving roads. All of this is done, naturalmente, with the support of the local carabinieri. Coffee and lunch stops are often held in private villas, while the dinners feature spectacular entertainment—think dancers etching rivers of fire into a moonlit beach.

Various Ferrari models seen during the annual road rally. 

Courtesy of Ferrari

The only downside? Fear of missing out. “It’s absolutely bonkers,” one young British property magnate with a string of Ferraris told me. “Once you’ve got a taste for this event, you just want to stay on the list.”

There Is Only One TVR T440R Sports Car in the World, and It Is Now up for Sale

There Is Only One TVR T440R Sports Car in the World, and It Is Now up for Sale

TVR may have hoped that the T440R sports car would change the future of automotive design, but the company went out of business before that could happen.

Despite this unfortunate bit of timing, the British marque managed to build one example of the beautiful, futuristic sports car before going under. And now the one-of-a-kind coupé could be yours, via UK rare car dealer Auto Lounge.

The 2003 T440R was a homologated road car based on the British marque’s T400R race car which raced at Spa, Sebring and Le Mans in 2003, reports CarBuzz. The company built four cars in order to meet FIA homologation requirements. Three of those were Typhons, which were each fitted with a naturally aspirated 4.0-liter straight-six engine.

2003 TVR T440R 

Auto Lounge

Unlike those road cars, the T440R was powered by an even brawnier 4.2-liter straight-six, which featured a gas-flowed cylinder head, steel crankshaft, carbon-fiber airbox and bespoke exhaust headers. Mated to a five-speed manual transmission, it was so powerful that TVR felt the need to detune it. Even then, it was still capable of generating a very robust 440 hp, accelerating from zero to 60 in less than four seconds and hitting a top speed of 200 mph. Basically, it was a street-legal race car.

Inside the T440R 

Auto Lounge

Just as noteworthy, though, is the T440R’s flamboyant design. With a long extended nose, flowing lines and a sloping roofline, the vehicle looks similar to an Italian sports car from the 1970s rather than something built right after the turn of the millennium. Completing the retrofuturistic vibe are a handsome pair of inset headlights, mag-style wheels and integrated rear spoiler. This bold sensibility carries over to the interior, which has a space spaceship-style cockpit, two-tone leather seats and chrome accents everywhere the eye can see.

Auto Lounge

T440R remains one of the more interesting models from TVR’s long and winding history (the company was resurrected last decade, though we’re still waiting on a new vehicle). And one of the rarest, as well. Because of this, it’ll cost a fair amount to get your hands on the one-and-only example of the stylish speed machine. Despite having over 25,000 miles on the odometer, Auto Lounge currently has the car listed for £192,990, or about $264,000. True exclusivity comes at a price.

The Gorgeous New Nissan Z Chronicles the History of the Z Car in One Model

The Gorgeous New Nissan Z Chronicles the History of the Z Car in One Model

Nearly a year after first appearing in prototype form, the seventh-generation Nissan Z car is finally here.

Simply dubbed the Z—not the 400Z, as many had expected—the Japanese automaker’s newest model is a decidedly modern coupé designed to celebrate its most famous nameplate. As we’ve known for months now, the car’s glorious retro-style body features several nods to the past. There’s an extended nose that recalls the original 240Z, while the rear end takes cues from the fourth-generation 300Z. These details shouldn’t all fit together, but they do and pretty seamlessly, resulting in a vehicle that looks even more athletic than its nearest competitor, the Toyota Supra.

2023 Nissan Z 

Nissan

Inside the coupé, Nissan has gone for a classic, streamlined look. The fully redesigned cockpit features a GTR-inspired sports steering wheel, a race car driver-designed instrument panel and the Z’s signature triple pod cluster of gauges tilted towards the driver. The center of the dash features a 9.0-inch infotainment screen from which you can navigate, check the weather and select entertainment options. There are also leather-appointed sports seats and an optional eight-speaker Bose audio system.

Inside the new Z 

Nissan

Nissan knows that the Z can’t just get by on looks, though. And that why the company has equipped the vehicle with a powertrain sure to please even the most demanding enthusiast. Under its long hood, you’ll find a snappy 3.0-liter twin-turbo V-6, according to a press release. The mill is mated to a six-speed manual transmission standard—yes, standard!—that sends power to the rear axle and can generate up to 400 hp, 350 ft lbs of torque and has a redline of 6,800 rpm. A nine-speed automatic transmission option is also available, but we’re guessing most Z fans will opt for the stick shift. Nissan has yet to release performance numbers, but the automaker said it expects the sports car to be up to 15 percent faster than the outgoing sixth-generation 370Z.
The new Z is equipped with mechanical limited-slip differential that better distributes power to the rear wheels and launch control to help eliminate wheel spin and hop. They’ll help ensure you get off to a better and quick start off the line. Other features include a stiffer chassis, double-wishbone suspension and mono tube shocks, providing better connection to the road. There are also sports brakes, which feature 14-inch front rotors and four-piston calipers, so you’ll be able to stop on a dime.

2023 Nissan Z Proto Spec and Nissan Z Sport 

Nissan

The Z will be available in three trim levels: Sport, which is the base version, Performance and Proto Spec. Performance includes a retuned suspension, front and rear spoilers, more comfortable seats and forged 19-inch wheels with Bridgestone Potenza S007 tires. Proto Spec, which, as you may have guessed, is based on last year’s prototype, features yellow brake calipers, bronze rims and a number of special interior accents. It will be limited to just 240 examples.
The new Z doesn’t have a firm release date yet, but expect it to be available sometime next spring. As for pricing, Nissan hasn’t said anything other than to stress the car’s “accessible” nature. What that means remains to be seen, but Road & Track suggests it will start around $40,000. Whatever the final cost, lovers of ’80s and ’90s sports cars may have just found a modern model they can love.
Check out more photos of the new Z below:

2023 Nissan Z Proto Spec 

Nissan

Nissan

Nissan

Nissan

Hello, Goodbye: Lotus’s New Emira Mid-Engine Sports Car Will Be Its Final Combustion Car

Hello, Goodbye: Lotus’s New Emira Mid-Engine Sports Car Will Be Its Final Combustion Car

Lotus may be speeding towards an electric future, but it’s not ready to give up on gas-powered cars just yet.

The British marque unveiled its final combustion sports car, the Emira, on Tuesday. Set to go on sale early next year, the modern-day speed machine is a replacement for both the Elise and Exige and will be its only non-EV from 2022 and beyond.

Lotus Emira 

Richard Pardon/Lotus

The mid-engine Emira is Lotus’s first all-new sports car since the Evora made its debut in 2009 (the Exige is the coupé version of the Elise, which launched in 1996). Despite this, it’s not the only new model the company has in the works. There’s also the brand’s first electric hypercar, the Evija, to which the Emira bears a striking resemblance. This is best seen in the new vehicle’s front fascia and the bold contours of its carbon-fiber body. Sadly, it doesn’t retain the Evija’s spaceship-like rear, but it’s still quite the head turner.

Inside the Emira 

Richard Pardon/Lotus

The style isn’t limited to the outside of the car. Open up the coupé’s doors and you’ll find a thoroughly up-to-date, two-seat cabin. The driver’s cockpit and dashboard have been fitted with 12.3- inch and 10.2-inch touchscreens, respectively. The infotainment system, which was developed in house, has integrated Android Auto and Apple CarPlay for those wondering how easy it will be to connect their smartphone.
As impressive as the Emira may look, it’s also got plenty to be proud of underneath its hood. The new model is the first built using the brand’s new Sports Car Architecture, which features the same bonded extruded aluminum chassis technology that debuted on the Elise, according to a press release. The car, which weighs in a relatively lightweight 3,097 pounds, will come equipped with either an AMG-sourced four-cylinder or a Toyota-sourced supercharged V-6 engine.

Richard Pardon/Lotus

Whichever engine you choose, you’ll be able to mate it to an automatic, dual-clutch or manual transmission. The former will produce 360 horses, while the latter can generate 400 hp and 317 ft lbs of twist. Neither of those mills can compete with the Evija’s quad-motor powertrain—which produces 2,000 hp and 1,250 ft lbs of torque—but they both provide plenty of pep. The automaker says the quickest Emira, which is almost certainly the V-6, will zoom from zero to 60 mph in 4.5 seconds and will have a top speed of 180 mph.

“The Emira is a game-changer for Lotus,” Matt Windle, the company’s managing director, said in a statement. “It stands as a beacon of everything we have achieved to date in the transformation of the business, the embodiment of our progress.”

Richard Pardon/Lotus

The Emira will be built at Lotus’s new renovated manufacturing facility located in Hethel in Norfolk, England. The marque has yet to announce pricing for the sports car, though it said the model will likely start below £60,000 (about $82,000) when it goes on sale early next year. While the Emira may not be nearly as powerful as the Evija—which also doesn’t have a firm release date yet—it’s loads more cost conscious. The company’s first EV will start in the $2 million range.

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