size inclusive

10 Sustainable and Size Inclusive Swimsuits to Feel Good in This Summer

10 Sustainable and Size Inclusive Swimsuits to Feel Good in This Summer

The urge to have a much-needed beach holiday — whether in a far-flung destination or closer to home — is stronger than ever. One way to look, feel, and do good during it? Wearing sustainable swimwear that flatters your body. With size inclusivity and sustainability being major themes this year, buying the right swimsuit that has been sourced and produced ethically is a must.
Brands have been recycling post-consumer waste like fishing nets and plastic bottles and turning them into Econyl, a new material that’s being used in swimwear. As for the size, options have increased with pieces ranging from monochrome, to fun prints, and cut out designs. There are plenty of choices to mix and match as well (such as the bikini bottom from Mara Hoffman), and pieces that would add a pop of color to your summer wardrobe (Evarae). If modesty is what you prefer while still keeping up with the trends, the bodysuits from Chromat, Azyä and the swim headscarf from Adidas would be the right pick.
Being comfortable and feeling confident in what you wear is key. Scroll through for our edit of sustainable swimwear for all shapes and sizes.
Read Next: 6 K-Beauty Pros on How to Get Gorgeous Summer Skin

Anna Wintour Joins These A-list Models To Explain Why Fashion Needs To Be Size Inclusive

Anna Wintour Joins These A-list Models To Explain Why Fashion Needs To Be Size Inclusive

Anna Wintour opened Vogue’s annual Forces of Fashion summit with a message of positivity. Describing the recent US election result as “inspiring,” she went on to praise designers who have fearlessly pushed on despite the challenges faced during the ongoing pandemic, reassuring virtual attendees that this is “a moment of change and of hope” – an appropriate prelude to the first discussion of the day: “Whose Positivity?,” moderated by Gabriella Karena-Johnson and featuring models Paloma Elsesser, Precious Lee, Tess McMillan and Jill Kortleve.
Anna Wintour and the “Whose Positivity?” panel during day one of the Vogue Forces of Fashion summit

“We have to acknowledge the fact that there was a time, not long ago, where this entire panel wouldn’t exist,” said Karefa-Johnson, referencing the shifts in the industry over the past decade and increasing diversity now shown on the runway. Recalling her first entry into the world of fashion, Kortleve described a painful two-year period of simply trying to lose weight in order to fit with the zeitgeist, while McMillan found herself pigeon-holed by agencies who wanted to place her in their ‘Curve’ sections – something she described as “very offensive.”
Model Tess McMillan, Vogue Forces of Fashion 2020 summit

Critiquing the vocabulary used to describe models’ bodies, Lee talked of the divisive implications of using such terms as ‘plus-size,’ a categorization she feels is antiquated given the fact that the average size of women in the US is a 14.
“I’m more than capable of creating a beautiful moment in a picture,” she said, as the discussion dug deeper into their thoughts on tokenism. “I think of my work as art,” said McMillan. “I’m not just a body that sells clothes.” Elsesser supported this, referring to a time when she would only be styled in “lingerie and a jacket,” for high fashion editorials because there were no runway samples created to fit her shape.
Describing her appearances on the Alexander McQueen and Fendi runways as “amazing moments,” former Vogue Arabia cover star, Elsesser explained the importance of such castings in relation to the resulting trickle-down effect: samples are created for the runway show and later shot for editorials before ultimately making it into stores.
Left to right: Alva Claire, Precious Lee and Jill Kortleve walk for Versace SS21 / Courtesy of Vogue Runway

Collectively and throughout the discussion, topics linked back to notions of ‘labelling’ and ‘limitation’. These are beautiful women who don’t want to be dictated to by the fashion industry, society, or anyone else for that matter. Describing her experience of walking the Versace SS21 runway as “a win for so many women…an exhale almost,” Lee was grateful that her chosen look – a short, vibrant fitted dress with towering neon green platforms – celebrated (and not covered), her body. “Don’t allow my extra 12 inches to scare you away!” she said, laughing.
Read Next: Everything You Need To Know About the Vogue Forces of Fashion Summit, Happening Now

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