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The Trend: Music-Festival Fashion

The Trend: Music-Festival Fashion

After nearly two years of ongoing cancellations, music festival season is in full swing this summer, with festival lovers and fashion mavens flocking to the summer party scenes in serious style, with no shortage of skin, accessories or bright colors.
There is no doubt music festivals from all over the world have become events where aspiring trendsetters and even celebrities have the option to express their wild and creative sides when it comes to summer festival outfits. Festival fashion outfit ideas have migrated from being cliché (think a sea of floral crowns) to experimental and unpredictable. 
Rave culture has a rich history filled with creativity, out-of-body experiences, inclusivity, fashion, and, of course, music. And with any culture, it cannot be defined thoroughly without the help of fashion. The rave scene has inspired outlandish, psychedelic and unconventional styles and even trends, mashing Bohemian, eclectic, glam rock, Gothic and camp fashion, opening an array of possibilities for music and festival lovers alike.

Outdoor music festivals have long been a rite of passage for young adults. From the flower children in the ’60s that packed their bags and headed to San Francisco, to youthful teens from across the country that hopped on Greyhounds and journeyed to the Catskills for one of the greatest festivals in music history, Woodstock in the summer of ’69.
Today, music festivals are more common than ever — with notable events such as Coachella in California — to dozens of festivals scheduled this summer across the country. From Lollapalooza (which just wrapped this past weekend in Chicago) to Burning Man in Nevada, Electric Zoo in New York City, Outside Lands in San Francisco to Primavera Sound in Los Angeles, these are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to festival options to express youth and seize summer. Here, WWD gathers idea for what to wear for upcoming musical outings.

Target Taps Rachel Comey, Victor Glemaud, Nili Lotan and Sandy Liang for Fall Designer Collection

Target Taps Rachel Comey, Victor Glemaud, Nili Lotan and Sandy Liang for Fall Designer Collection

Target has some new designer friends, including Rachel Comey, Victor Glemaud, Sandy Liang and Nili Lotan. 
The big-box retailer revealed its Fall Designer Collection on Monday. The limited-edition assortment consists of more than 180 pieces, ranging in price from $15 to $80 and sizes XXS to 4X.  

Looks from the fall 2021 Target Designer Collection by Victor Glemaud. 
Courtesy Photo

“For the past 20 years, our guests have continued to express excitement when we introduce them to new and emerging designers from across the globe, all at an incredible value,” Jill Sando, executive vice president and chief merchandising officer at Target, said in a statement. “This fall, we’re building upon that legacy and bringing together four dynamic and highly regarded designers to introduce a collection of inclusive, on-trend and timeless fashion staples to re-energize guests’ wardrobes for the fall season.”

The retailer has a long history of showcasing designers in its stores and online. In April, Target tapped Christopher John Rogers, Alexis and Rixo for its 2021 Designer Dress Collection. The company has also previously worked with LoveShackFancy, Cushnie, Lisa Marie Fernandez, Zac Posen, Anna Sui, Rodarte, Missoni, Phillip Lim, Jason Wu and Lilly Pulitzer, among others.

Pieces from Target’s fall 2021 Designer Collection by Sandy Liang. 
Courtesy Photo

Meanwhile, the company’s apparel assortment continues to grow, even with so many consumers working from home over the last year-and-a-half. In the most recent quarter, apparel sales grew 60 percent, year-over-year, thanks to strength across loungewear, innerwear, activewear, men’s wear and children’s apparel. That’s in addition to a number of private-label partnerships at Target, including Levi’s and Journelle, and the mass merchant’s own apparel brands, such as activewear label All In Motion. 
“So apparel has been one of our strengths,” Brian Cornell, chairman and chief executive officer of Target, told reporters in November. “And certainly from a market-share standpoint, one of the real highlights from our business throughout the quarter. And we certainly see that continuing as we finish up the year.”

Why This Extremely Feminine Silhouette Could Be the New Loungewear

Why This Extremely Feminine Silhouette Could Be the New Loungewear

While many women are working and lounging from home, they are finding a blossoming comfort in wearing the most feminine of silhouettes.
Getty Images
Life as we knew it was tossed out the window in 2020. When the coronavirus pandemic hit in March, away went dinner parties, art exhibitions, and extravagant fashion weeks. As lockdowns buckled most of the world down at home, ideas shifted with regards to how we should dress, beautify ourselves, and feel good when confined to home, seeing the same people, day in and day out. Life goes on, as does fashion. Adapting to the circumstances, the desire to dress-up persists – albeit with comfort.
Courtesy of Alessandra Rich
Along with stylish athleisure brands that are now stocked in every woman’s wardrobe, are also day dresses – the new loungewear. The trend took to the runways of SS21 in the form of slim dresses, often with pouf- sleeves and ethereal fabric, from Alessandra Rich, Coach, and Rodarte. They harkened back to the ultra-feminine, gracious glamour of the 1940s. These are accompanied by long, layered tunics at Fendi and Jil Sander, which can be easily worn at home or out in comfort. Middle Eastern designers similarly picked up on the trend, launching a host of dainty dresses for a wide variety of occasions. Flexibility and versatility are key these days.
Courtesy of Rodarte
At Reemami, Reema Al Banna devised several long dresses, some in tunic style and others with a tight bodice reflective of the Forties dress. These are decorated with the designer’s distinct artistic flair, with long, colorful lines and shapes and playful sketches. “While everyone is saying that leisurewear and activewear are taking over, I believe that dresses and skirts that make a woman feel good are still very much here and will never go out of fashion or be overlooked, even during these times,” comments Al Banna. “My collections continue to have easy-to-wear, comfortable dresses as well as fabulous dresses for all occasions. We will most likely use stretchy fabrics, like jersey material.”
Photo: INDIGITAL
Dubai-based Bouguessa’s SS21 collection includes long shirts in a variety of earthy hues, alongside button-down dresses. “They were designed with high comfort in mind; the material is natural fibers for the majority, allowing the clothes to be airy and easy,” says designer Faiza Bouguessa. “We want to focus on classic pieces with a longer life cycle, but at the core of this collection is the freshness of the material that brings this concept of day dresses and day wear as loungewear.” Lama Jouni, a Dubai-based, Lebanese designer, echoes the need for triumph but also glamour. Her latest designs include slim-fit halter dresses that are at once seductive and allow the wearer to move with ease. “As a designer I see the shift in the mentality of women when it comes to shopping; women want to feel comfortable, elegant, yet effortless and that’s what I want to offer with this line.” As Salim Cherfane, designer of Lebanese brand Jeux de Mains, known for its playful and disruptive designs, says, “We all need basics. We all need something to hold us together and make us feel comfortable with everything happening on the outside in this world.”
Courtesy of Reemami
The day dress trend whisks us back to another period of great cultural change: the Roaring Twenties, which followed the devastating influenza pandemic of 1918. Women were also theoretically granted the right to vote in the US in 1920. During this time, at the end of each day, women would hang up their house dresses and aprons and go out to run errands and visit friends. The dresses they donned were comfortable yet fancy with lusher materials. The cut and the fabric used differentiated a woman’s house dress from her day dress. The latter was made largely of casual jersey, wool, linen, knits, crepe, and rayon as well as silk, organdy, taffeta, and velvet. In essence, it helped mark a woman’s newfound political and cultural freedoms.
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Saeedah Haque, a British-Bangladeshi designer known for her streetwear abayas, has similarly devised overlays and dresses that reflect our new era’s need for dressing with comfort and elegance. “Comfort is the greatest luxury and loungewear is the new power dressing,” she posits. “I love to disrupt the formal day dress and it is through challenging things that we can innovate. Comfort is a power unlike any other. I want us to wear that power and take it to the streets.”
Read Next: At the Saudi Cup 2021, the Dress Code Was Inspired By the Kingdom’s Fashion Heritage
Originally published in the February 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia

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