RM Sotheby’s

This Track-Ready Ferrari F40 ‘Competizione’ May Be the Fastest of All Time. Now It’s up for Sale.

This Track-Ready Ferrari F40 ‘Competizione’ May Be the Fastest of All Time. Now It’s up for Sale.

Every Ferrari F40 is special, but only one is the fastest.

A converted “Competizione” version of the iconic supercar is currently up for private sale through RM Sotheby’s. The one-off speed machine spent more than a decade competing and is believed to be the most potent road-going F40 of all time.
The F40 is easily one of the radical models Ferrari has ever released. The mid-engine supercar features a flamboyant Pininfarina-designed look and was the fastest, most powerful and most expensive Prancing Horse at the time of its release in 1987. In fact, it was the world’s fastest production car until the introduction of the Lamborghini Diablo in 1990. Although it was always meant to be a road car, Ferrari wanted to see what it could do on the track and commissioned a number of racing-spec examples from Michelotto Automobili. The racers proved to be a hit with enthusiasts and a number of F40 owners decided to have their street-legal cars converted for competition.

Inside the F40 “Competizione” 

RM Sotheby’s

The F40 “Competition” is available to buy now via RM Sotheby’s. The auction house hasn’t announced a price tag, but the sports car has regularly sold for in excess of $2 million in recent years, and none of those would stand a chance against this example in a race. You can make an offer now through the RM Sotheby’s website.

Click here to see all of the photos of the 1989 Ferrari F40 “Competizione.”

This One-of-a-Kind McLaren F1 Will Be Auctioned Off at Monterey Car Week

This One-of-a-Kind McLaren F1 Will Be Auctioned Off at Monterey Car Week

McLaren F1s don’t come more unique then this.

A one-of-a-kind 1998 example of Gordon Murray’s iconic supercar will be auctioned off by RM Sotheby’s at Monterey Car Week. This particular example is the only F1 to leave the factory with revised headlights that make it easier to see at night.
The F1 is the kind of vehicle that changed things forever. When McLaren’s first road car arrived in 1992, it mixed style and performance in a way that few cars ever have. The Peter Stevens-designed exterior—with its athletic lines, bubble cockpit and butterfly doors—has rarely been topped in the 30 years since its debut. The ultra-lightweight speed machine’s capabilities have aged just as well. Thanks to a BMW-sourced, naturally aspirated 6.1-liter V-12 mated to a transverse six-speed manual transmission, the F1 could reach a top speed of 240.1 mph, a feat that made it the world’s fastest car for over a decade.

This McLaren F1 features the internal headlamps from a BMW Z1 roadster 

RM Sotheby’s

The F1 may be one of the history’s truly great cars, but it’s not perfect. One glaring flaw was its stock headlights, which were notably dim at night, according to the auction house. In attempt to fix the issue, McLaren built one F1 with the internal headlamps from the BMW Z1 roadster and shortened the housing surrounding the lights to account for the modification. This car, chassis no. 059, was the only example to roll off the line with the feature.
Even without its revised headlights, this one-off F1 would be exclusive. McLaren only built 106 examples of its first supercar, just 64 of which were constructed to street-legal specification. The example RM Sotheby’s is selling is one of those. It’s finished in silver, one of the colors most closely associated with the model, and has all the original parts it left the factory with, including its beastly V-12. With 16,400 miles on the odometer, it is more than just a display piece, though it does look to be in impeccable shape.

Inside the 1998 F1 

RM Sotheby’s

With barely more than 100 examples out there, it’s not every day that an F1 goes up for grabs. This particular example hasn’t been seen in more than a decade, so chances are you’ll have to be ready to spend big to get your hands on it. RM Sotheby’s hasn’t announced an estimate for the vehicle, but street-legal examples regularly sell for more than $2 million (and can reach as high as $20 million) on the rare occasion they hit the open market.

Click here to see all the photos of the one-of-a-kind McLaren F1.

RM Sotheby’s

This Rare, Street-Legal Jaguar XJR-15 Could Sell for up to $1.4 Million at Auction

This Rare, Street-Legal Jaguar XJR-15 Could Sell for up to $1.4 Million at Auction

An ultra-exclusive road car based on one of Jaguar’s greatest racers is about to go up for grabs.

RM Sotheby’s will auction off a 1991 XJR-15 as part of its upcoming Monterey Car Week sales slate. Not only is the stunning speed machine one of the best looking supercars of the 1990s, it’s also one of only 27 examples that were street legal.
At the dawn of the 1990s, Jaguar was back on top of the endurance racing world. The British marque had been a winner’s circle fixture during the ‘50s, but had gone decades without tasting victory at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. A Jag finally reclaimed the checkered flag in 1988 and repeated the feat in 1990. Those races were won by two different (but related) cars, the XJR-9 and XJR-12, both of which were built by Tom Wilkenshaw Racing. The builder was able to convince the automaker that there would be interest in a road car inspired by the winning racers. This would end up being the XJR-15, which featured a chassis based on the one found in the XJR-9, a new futuristic design and was the first street-legal car made primarily of carbon fiber.

RM Sotheby’s

Jaguar Sport—a joint venture between the marque and Tom Wilkenshaw Racing—would build just 50 XJR-15s between 1990 and 1992. This particular example, chassis no. 018, was one of the street-legal models. The body—which was designed Peter Stevens, who was also responsible for the McLaren F1—is finished in a rich coat of metallic dark blue, which helps accentuate its elegant lines. The two-person cabin is spartan, but also equipped with two comfortable leather racing seats. Although the car is over 30 years old, it was restored to factory condition in 2015 and looks brand new.
The XJR-15 is as capable as it is good looking. It is powered by a mid-mounted 5.3-liter V-12 almost identical to the one found in the XJR-9. That mill was mighty enough to push the vehicle to a top speed of 215 mph when it was brand new. One quirk about this example—which is known as the “Japan Study Car” because it was used for aerodynamic and other testing—is that it’s equipped with a five-speed transaxle gearbox, instead of the race-tuned, six-speed gearbox found in other examples. It has only 1,000 miles of use, so it should drive pretty well too.

The XJR-15’s interior 

RM Sotheby’s

Interested in adding this historically important supercar to your garage? RM Sotheby’s expects the car to sell for between $1.2 million and $1.4 million when it hits the block on August 20. And considering the condition it’s in, that might just be a bargain.

Click here to see all the photos of the 1991 Jaguar XJR-15.

RM Sotheby’s

Car of the Week: Michael Schumacher’s Undefeated Formula 1 Ferrari Could Fetch $8 Million at Auction

Car of the Week: Michael Schumacher’s Undefeated Formula 1 Ferrari Could Fetch $8 Million at Auction

The auction tents set up during Northern California’s upcoming Monterey Car Week promise to be brimming with Ferraris of every model, age, rarity and provenance. This parade of Prancing Horses will, in almost every instance, be accompanied by the ripping-silk sound of strident V-12 engines, as each car, with the blip of the throttle, drives across the auction block. One Ferrari, however, is so special that it likely won’t make a peep, so high-strung is its demeanor and so rigorous its starting regimen. That car, one of the most significant Ferrari race cars in existence, is the 1998 Ferrari F300 Formula 1 machine driven to victory four times by seven-time Formula 1 World Champion Michael Schumacher.

The Ferrari F300 race car driven by Michael Schumacher to four Grand Prix victories during the 1998 Formula 1 season. 

Kevin Van Campenhout, courtesy of RM Sotheby’s.

It’s no secret that Enzo Ferrari built street cars to support his racing efforts—especially Formula 1, which was, from the marque’s beginning, at the top of the motorsports pyramid. Historic F1 cars are the big game of the collector car world, though they pose none of the legal or ethical challenges like bagging a bull elephant or a mother white rhino. The latter might be stuffed, mounted and dramatically spot-lit in some ghoulish man cave, but many former F1 cars—once-furious machines whose raison d’être was to be faster than their competitors—often meet a similar inanimate end, relegated to private displays in clean-room-like garages. No matter, they remain some of the most coveted race cars in the world.

The cockpit where Schumacher controlled the car’s 800 hp V-10 power train. 

Kevin Van Campenhout, courtesy of RM Sotheby’s.

Maranello introduced the motoring press to its F300 Formula 1 car at the beginning of 1998, and the design saw continuous development through the race season. It’s powered by a new-at-the-time 3.0-liter V-10 engine that makes 800 hp and revs to a blender-like 17,500 rpm. The power train and the car’s advanced aerodynamics prefigured Ferrari’s domination of Formula 1 into the new century. Of course, that success was due in large part to the indefatigable Schumacher.
Chassis No. 187 saw its first checkered flag in the Canadian Grand Prix in Montreal, with Schumacher setting the fastest lap with a 16-second lead. Subsequent victories in France and Britain pit Ferrari squarely against McLaren-Mercedes for Drivers’ and Constructors’ titles. Shortly after, Schumacher won the Italian Grand Prix, securing a career win for the 33rd time.

With chassis No. 187, Schumacher won with a 16-second lead in the 1998 Canadian Grand Prix. 

Kevin Van Campenhout, courtesy of RM Sotheby’s.

In 1999, Scuderia Ferrari privately sold its F1-champion race car directly to its first owner in unrestored, as-raced condition, the same state of preservation in which the vehicle remains today. Kept discreetly away from view, it is being offered for the first time in a public sale by RM Sotheby’s on Saturday, August 20, and is estimated to fetch as much as $8 million.
Click here to see all the photos of Michael Schumacher’s Undefeated Formula 1 Ferrari Heading to Auction.

Michael Schumacher’s undefeated 1998 Ferrari F300 Formula 1 race car. 

Kevin Van Campenhout, courtesy of RM Sotheby’s.

This Ultra-Rare 1936 Bugatti Type 57S Atalante Is Heading to Auction This Fall

This Ultra-Rare 1936 Bugatti Type 57S Atalante Is Heading to Auction This Fall

Ettore Bugatti once said, “Nothing is too beautiful, nothing is too expensive.” This pre-war ride could well be proof of that.

The rare Bugatti Type 57S Atalante Coupé in question is one of the most desirable cars in the French marque’s century-long history. It will lead RM Sotheby’s St. Moritz sale on September 9. Additional auction highlights include a sleek silver 1965 Aston Martin DB5 Vantage and an elegant black 1957 Mercedes-Benz 190 SL, no less.

Designed by the aforementioned founder’s son, Jean Bugatti, the Type 57 included S and SC variants (Surbaissé for “lowered” and Compresseur for “supercharger”) that reached very limited production in the 1930s. Named after Greek heroine Atalanta, the Type 57S and 57SC Atalante featured two-door coupe bodywork, a low-slung chassis and an elegant Art Deco aesthetic.

The pristine Atalante has been in the same collection for nearly 30 years. 

RM Sotheby’s

They were at the bleeding edge in terms of tech, too, with a 3.3-liter inline-eight engine that could produce 160 hp for a top speed of 120 mph. (Most cars at that time struggled to hit 50 mph.) Indeed, the Type 57 set numerous world records and won the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1937 and 1939.
This fine example is believed to be one of only 17 Atalante Coupés to leave the factory. Dating back to 1936, the 86-year-old four-wheeler features a striking two-tone paint scheme, with a glossy black base and a bright-red French curve on each side. It also has stunning riveting throughout its bodywork, according to RM Sotheby’s.

The 1936 model remains in “outstanding condition.” 

RM Sotheby’s

What’s more, the auction house says the vintage rarity has resided in a private Swiss collection for nearly three decades and as such remains in “outstanding condition.”
Although no estimate has yet been given, you can expect the Atalante to fetch a pretty penny. In 2020, a similar model sold for more than $10.4 million at a Gooding & Company auction. Just remember what Ettore said: Nothing is too expensive.
Click here to see all the photos of the 1936 Bugatti Type 57S Atalante.

RM Sotheby’s

An Ultra-Rare 1968 Ferrari Daytona Prototype Will Be Auctioned During Monterey Car Week

An Ultra-Rare 1968 Ferrari Daytona Prototype Will Be Auctioned During Monterey Car Week

A prototype of one of Ferrari’s most beloved models is set to go up for grabs next month.

RM Sotheby’s will auction off a stunning pre-production example of the Ferrari 365 GTB/4 during Monterey Car Week. The silver speed demon is one of three prototypes made before the final Scaglietti-built grand tourer made its debut at the Paris Salon in 1968.

As legend has it, Ferrari only built the 365 GTB/4 because its factory wasn’t ready to start production of a planned rear-mounted inline-12 model. Instead, it decided to build one last car with its long-running front-engine “Colombo” short-block V-12. Combine that potent mill with gorgeous coachwork by Pininfarina and you end up with the 365 GTB/4, or Daytona as its better known to collectors and enthusiasts. The car’s nickname—meant to commemorate the marque’s 1-2-3 finish at the 24 Hours of Daytona in 1967—is purely unofficial, but that hasn’t stopped it from sticking around for decades.

1968 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Prototype by Scaglietti 

RM Sotheby’s

This particular example is the second of three Daytona prototypes built before the car made its debut in October of 1968. Ferrari was still clearly figuring out what it wanted the 365 to be, so its features a chassis (no. 11001) and a numbers matching 3.3-liter four-cam type 226 engine from its predecessor, the 265 GTB/4. It also featured several design elements that wouldn’t make it to production, including a longer nose, oval eggcrate grille and recessed headlamps.
Despite the differences between the prototype and the final production model, the early Daytona is still a beautiful car. It’s finished in the original coat of silver that it left the factory in. Meanwhile, its two-seat cabin is covered in black leather and has a three-spoke, wood-rimmed steering wheel. It also comes with Ferrari Classiche certification and the new owner will get its Red Book once it’s printed by the marque.

Inside the 365 GTB/4 Prototype by Scaglietti 

RM Sotheby’s

The 365 GTB/4 prototype will hit the block as part of RM Sotheby’s multi-day Monterey Car Week sale, which will be held at the California city’s conference center from August 18 to 20. The auction house hasn’t announced a pre-sale estimate for the car, but early examples of the model have regularly sold in excess of $500,000. Just imagine how much one of its prototypes will go for.
Click here to see all the photos of the 1968 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Prototype by Scaglietti.

RM Sotheby’s

PHP Code Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com