Rimac Automobili

The First Rimac Nevera Was Just Delivered to Former Formula 1 Champ Nico Rosberg

The First Rimac Nevera Was Just Delivered to Former Formula 1 Champ Nico Rosberg

It’s a long journey from prototype to production car and the Rimac Nevera has finally completed it with the first delivery going to Formula 1 champ Nico Rosberg. 

Not that the Nevera hasn’t already impressed us plenty—the world record setting, Robb Report Best of the Best-winning EV hypercar has already proved its mettle as a highly functional, extraordinarily capable speed machine, as confirmed in our first drive. But delivering a production-spec car to a paying customer is easily the steepest milestone any carmaker faces, and paves the way for the inevitable gauntlet of real world durability, build quality and reliability.

The Croatian-built Nevera touts some astounding specs—0 to 62 mph in 1.85 seconds, nearly 2,000 hp and a seven-figure price tag. Rosberg’s stats aren’t bad either, as his 11 years in F1 included 206 races, 57 podiums, 23 wins and a 2016 World Champion title. The German-Finnish former racer is a near-ideal debut customer for the outrageous Nevera, the first product from Bugatti Rimac, which has helped raise $500M on the company’s valuation of $2B.

The first Rimac Nevera delivered 

Bugatti Rimac

Interestingly, though Rosberg’s 20-minute YouTube video of the delivery process feels like a sponsored sales pitch for the company, he reveals that he foolishly opted out of an early opportunity to invest in the company. Rosberg does, however, express genuine wonder at its organ-compressing acceleration, remarking that a YouTube drag race against a Ferrari SF90 made the Italian supercar look like “it’s some kind of Renault Twingo or something.” 
“Ever since I first met Mate and truly understood the genius behind Nevera, I knew I wanted car number one,” Rosberg says in Rimac’s official press release. Based on his business track record, it appears his passion for EV life is real: Rosberg has invested in more than 20 mobility startups, as well as Formula E. Furthermore, his 2021 championship-winning Extreme E race team is currently leading in points.

Rosberg and Rimac discussing the Nevera 

Bugatti Rimac

CEO Mate Rimac adds that “… we set out to build a car that impress even the best drivers in the world. Nico was on that list, and it’s a great feeling to know that someone who has mastered the most focused and cutting-edge motorsport in the world gets such a thrill from the car we’ve created.” Even better? Mate won’t have to worry about bad PR from reckless pileups when the ex-F1 champ maneuvers his new Rimac through the streets of Monaco. We hope.

From the Ferrari SF90 Spider to the 1,914 HP Rimac Nivera: The Best in Automotive

From the Ferrari SF90 Spider to the 1,914 HP Rimac Nivera: The Best in Automotive

The Big Idea: Shifting to Neutral
After decades of fits and starts, electric vehicles are now squarely in the automotive firmament, with even the combustion-loving likes of Rolls-Royce, Bentley and Lamborghini embracing a battery-powered future. So what’s next? Enter the climate-neutral car.
Most EVs are not as clean as the brochures would have you believe, considering the immense carbon footprint of battery manufacturing, plus the fact that much of the energy grid is still plugged into coal-fueled power plants. In theory, a climate-neutral car would not just forego tailpipe emissions, as with a standard EV, but would also be net-zero when it comes to all harmful greenhouse emissions, from production as well as operation.
Yet according to Brett Smith, director of technology at the Center for Automotive Research in Ann Arbor, Mich., “There’s so much heavy manufacturing that goes into a vehicle, very few suppliers will be capable of meeting the goal in the next 5 to 10 years.” Smith adds, “To know that a car will never use coal-powered electricity is still decades away in the United States.”
Undeterred, one player leading the charge is Polestar, aiming to be the first to release a climate-neutral production car, in 2030. Hans Pehrson, head of the endeavor Polestar has dubbed the 0 Project, acknowledges the difficulty. “I really compare this to when JFK said it was time to put a man on the moon,” says Pehrson, adding that “those involved knew they couldn’t do it on their own; they needed collaboration.”
Suppliers that have already signed on with the Swedish marque include SSAB, a steel manufacturer that’s developed a fossil-free version of the alloy, and Norway-based Hydro, which is working on carbon-neutral aluminum. Most importantly, Polestar plans to bring this to fruition without resorting to offsetting, a way of cooking the environmental books. “The most common form of offsetting is to pay someone to plant trees somewhere else,” says Pehrson, “but if we continue to let out CO2 emissions, the PPM [parts per million] level will not stop increasing.” He’s aware that electricity will not be 100 percent clean by the 0 Project’s target date but emphasizes that, for the first time, there would be the “possibility” of net-zero for the consumer.
Also in the neutrality race is automotive designer Henrik Fisker, who cites 2027 as his team’s deadline “to build a vehicle that is climate neutral through the life cycle of the car.” He breaks that sequence into five parts: upstream sourcing, manufacturing, logistics, the use phase and end-of-life recycling. Recognizing the battery as an Achilles’ heel, Fisker is “looking at innovative ways to source as much non-primary, recycled content as possible, including that of the minerals still crucial to effective batteries.”
Lecedra Welch, environmental-sustainability manager at the Michigan-based Automotive Industry Action Group, is quick to distinguish these long-term efforts from sleight-of-hand greenwashing. “Our industry understands how important climate change is, and companies are actively working with competitors and their suppliers to address these challenges and mitigate risks,” she says. It’s a sentiment shared by Smith. “Small automakers with very low volumes are in an intriguing position to do this as a test-case exploration,” he says. “It’s pushing the boundaries to figure out what the solutions can be.”

Bugatti Confirms It’s Developing a New (Gas-Powered) Hypercar

Bugatti Confirms It’s Developing a New (Gas-Powered) Hypercar

Though we recently test drove what was once believed to be Bugatti’s final production supercar with a pure combustion engine, the marque’s CEO Mate Rimac has revealed that an all-new model with the classic motor is in development.

In a new video shared by the carmaker, the 33-year-old Croatian entrepreneur claims drivers will be “astonished” with the new hypercar and that it will have never-before-seen features on a production car. The specific features aren’t discussed in the video, but then again, neither were the details regarding the new model’s engine when Rimac orignally announced plans for the car last August at Monterey Car Week. In a discussion with Bugatti collector Manny Khosbin that made headlines over the summer, the CEO revealed that the new hypercar could arrive as early as 2024.

In the new video, Rimac goes on to give an overview of the marque’s record-breaking 2021, and the revamped corporate structure for Bugatti Rimac. It’s no secret that last year was the marque’s most successful in its 112-year history, having received a total of 150 orders. The company claims 60 percent of those personalized orders were from new customers. In addition, the Chiron and all 40 units of the new Bolide hypercars were sold out in no more than two months from releasing.

Bugatti merged with the Rimac’s EV startup last July, and has since announced both a new hybrid and all-electric model. The French marque, however, appears to be making a different choice than other luxury automakers—like Lamborghini, Audi and Rolls-Royce—which have laid out plans to cease production of combustion engines entirely to reduce carbon emissions. With the CEO’s latest statements, it’s clear that fans of classic Bugattis—with pistons, gas and exhaust—will still have new models to look forward to.
“There is a future for combustion engines in Bugatti,” Rimac says in the video. “It is absolutely clear that the Bugatti quality and what the brand stands for needs to remain. In fact, it needs to be expanded. The origin must remain, and it is the full commitment of Bugatti Rimac and myself—this is not negotiable. The craftsmanship of Bugatti will definitely continue, and we even plan to improve it.”

Tested: Bugatti’s 1,578 HP Chiron Super Sport Is Like a Street-Going Learjet

Tested: Bugatti’s 1,578 HP Chiron Super Sport Is Like a Street-Going Learjet

So here it is: peak internal-combustion engine. Since Karl Benz built his Patent Motorwagen 135 years ago, carmakers have been refining and emboldening the gas-guzzling power plant that still propels most of our cars, but we’ve finally reached a tipping point. Automakers are announcing they’re ceasing the development of conventional engines in favor of hybrid and electric power trains, even setting dates by which they’ll no longer offer the former at all. Bugatti is no exception.

Now with a majority of it controlled by supercar and EV-tech start-up Rimac, the French marque will go hybrid for its next all-new model, eventually to be followed by a fully electric vehicle. But the recent launch of Bugatti’s 1,578 hp Chiron Super Sport marks this bittersweet moment perfectly: Not only is it the fastest, most powerful pure-combustion production car from a heritage manufacturer; there’s also a good chance it will remain so forever.
Arguments and nit-picking shall ensue, of course. Hennessey, Koenigsegg and SSC North America all have cars that claim greater muscle in development, but assuming these vehicles are homologated and make it to production with their targeted outputs intact, they’ll still require E85 gas to deliver on those promises. The Chiron Super Sport makes its power on regular fuel and can be purchased now.

A look at the interior gears and steering wheel. 

Courtesy of Bugatti

Fewer than 40 Chiron build slots remain, which will be split between this Super Sport and the track-focused Pur Sport with its (mere) 1,479 hp. If you’re lucky enough to have both—and some will—you might be surprised to discover that the more powerful car actually feels a bit slower on the road than the Pur Sport, with the latter variant’s shorter gearing making it more urgent up to around 180 mph.
But the Super Sport wasn’t intended to provide more speed everywhere. It was conceived as the ur-Chiron, eschewing the Pur Sport’s feral character to retain the famous refinement of the original, only this time with an unanswerable power output and a staggering (if largely academic) top speed that’s been—get this—“limited” to 273 mph.
Even priced at more than $3.5 million, it’s a deeply impressive and appealing combination. Despite its grunt, I found that at low speeds the Super Sport is as docile and cooperative as a Volkswagen Golf, but with the thrust and handling to devour transcontinental road trips like a street-going Learjet. The suspension has been firmed slightly to cope with the higher v-max, which doesn’t compromise the model’s elegant ride experience but does make the car a little more agile on a mountain road. It’s amazing how quickly you forget the size and mass—let alone the value—of what you’re driving as it dives into apexes like a big Ferrari; it’s not scary, just fun. Likewise the massive traction that allows you to deploy the enormity of that power on any reasonable straight, even if only momentarily.

While the Chiron Super Sport boasts 1,180 ft lbs of torque and hits 273 mph, its comportment at low speeds rivals any daily drivers. 

Courtesy of Bugatti

But if you want to feel the benefit of the Super Sport’s larger turbochargers and subtly reworked aero package, with its Le Mans–style “longtail” bodywork, you need a circuit—an extremely lengthy one. At Volkswagen’s Ehra-Lessien test track, with straights that run to five miles, Bugatti took one of these to 304.8 mph. I had only the 1.1-mile straight at the Paul Ricard circuit in the South of France. Entering at about the same speed and braking in approximately the same spot, the Pur Sport hit 206 mph but the Super Sport reached 217 mph, its acceleration swelling noticeably faster and far harder than its sibling or anything I’ve driven before. Or, most probably, anything I’m ever likely to drive again.

How Mate Rimac, Bugatti’s New 33-Year-Old CEO, Took the (Electric) Hypercar World by Storm

How Mate Rimac, Bugatti’s New 33-Year-Old CEO, Took the (Electric) Hypercar World by Storm

Mate Rimac sat at a table, facing a camera. To his right was Oliver Blume, the CEO of Porsche, and to his left its finance chief, Lutz Meschke. They were about to host a video conference to announce the deal to merge Bugatti, for which Porsche has responsibility within the vast Volkswagen Group, with Rimac’s eponymous start-up hypercar maker. A small number of journalists from the business media joined Robb Report on the call, among them the Financial Times and Bloomberg. Blume and Meschke were dressed in sober business attire, as you’d expect of German C-suite executives making a major announcement to the world’s press, and they sat stiff and upright. But as the 33-year-old Rimac relaxed into his chair, his sneakers emerged from beneath the table, followed by a pair of bare legs. The wunderkind of the hypercar world was about to be handed control of one of its most fabled marques, and he’d chosen to wear shorts for the occasion.

Rimac doubtless meant no disrespect, but his casual dress served as useful visual shorthand for a transfer of power extraordinary even by the turbulent standards of the supercar industry. Stewardship of arguably the world’s most prestigious marque, founded 112 years ago by one of the great automotive auteurs and maker of some of the most beautiful, powerful cars ever to grace the road, was passing from Europe’s largest manufacturing company to a start-up that began in a tiny nation 12 years ago by someone then barely out of his teens. Later that evening there would be a glossy event livestreamed from the spectacular 14th-century Lovrijenac fortress perched high over beautiful, ancient Dubrovnik and the opal waters of Croatia’s Adriatic coast. Rimac (his name is pronounced MAH-tay REE-mats) leapt on stage to acknowledge the significance of what was happening and the responsibility he was assuming. He was now wearing a well-cut suit but still kept the sneakers.

From left: A Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo, a Rimac Nevera and a Bugatti Chiron Pur Sport, a fitting troika. 

Rimac Automobili

Despite his youth, Rimac is already acknowledged by his peers as one of the preeminent modern supercar makers, a successor to Ettore Bugatti alongside Horacio Pagani, Christian von Koenigsegg and Gordon Murray. The club of engineers who have created the cars and companies that carry their names from scratch is exclusive, and Rimac had only officially joined it when the Bugatti deal was announced in early July. The Rimac Nevera, his first proper production electric hypercar, was tested by Robb Report and a handful of other media in June, and customer deliveries are just starting.

But Rimac is already an established player. While developing his own hypercar, he has built a multibillion-dollar business supplying his high-performance electric-propulsion technology to at least 15 major carmakers, including Ferrari, Aston Martin, Mercedes and Rimac’s fellow auteur Christian von Koenigsegg. Porsche and Hyundai are not only customers but also investors with significant equity stakes, and Pininfarina likes the Nevera so much that it’s using the car as the basis of its new 1,877 hp Battista. His business has grown so fast that Rimac simply hasn’t had time to get his own hypercar on sale until now.
The optics of the Bugatti-Rimac merger may seem odd at first, but the logic is indisputable. A new generation of electric Bugattis needs a transcendent level of performance, but Volkswagen has lost the will to fund it. Big car companies can spend like the US military. Analysts estimate that VW has invested at least $2.4 billion in Bugatti since it took control in 1998 and lost around $5 million on every Veyron sold. It spent about $420 million creating the Chiron from the bones of the Veyron, and sources close to the deal say VW expected to spend the same again electrifying this 16-year-old platform.
Rimac is said to have offered to develop an all-new Chiron successor for around $240 million. Rather than write a check for that sum, VW proposed a merger. No cash is believed to have changed hands. The new Bugatti-Rimac will be 55 percent owned by the Rimac Group and 45 percent by Porsche, on behalf of Volkswagen. For now, the two brands will continue to be designed and built separately: Bugattis in Molsheim, France, and Rimacs from 2023 at its new campus headquarters near Zagreb.

The Rimac campus, set to be completed in 2023 outside the Croatian capital of Zagreb, will be the company’s global headquarters. 

Rimac Automobili

Rimac is putting only his hypercar-making business into the new joint venture. His fast-growing operation supplying high-performance EV power trains and other equipment to the global carmakers is a separate business: Rimac Technology, solely owned by Rimac Group. Only 150 Neveras will be made, and Bugatti currently builds fewer than 100 cars each year. Even when the combined Bugatti-Rimac is at full production, the venture will account for only 15 to 20 percent of Rimac Group turnover. Rimac Technology will make up the rest, and it’s about to grow rapidly. It has contracts in place to supply major premium carmakers with components and complete power trains for the high-performance variants of their pure-electric models. With volumes of up to 100,000 each year, it’s a huge leap in scale for Rimac. Your next car might not be a Nevera, but there’s a chance it will have Rimac tech on board.

Rimac remains the largest shareholder in the Rimac Group, with a 37 percent stake. The latest funding round is believed to value the group in the mid-single-digit billions, giving him a nominal net worth of around $2 billion. In addition to Porsche AG’s 45 percent stake in Bugatti-Rimac, Porsche’s venture-capital arm owns 24 percent of Rimac Group, giving Porsche indirect majority ownership of Bugatti-Rimac. But Porsche is clear that there is no combination of voting rights, no de facto or de jure control, and that having Rimac as CEO of all three companies is one of the reasons it wanted the deal. “As a shareholder we want a real entrepreneur as CEO,” Blume says. “It is our clear strategy to pass operational control to Mate.”

The new Rimac Nevera assembly line in Croatia, where Rimac Group is based. 

Rimac Automobili

Perhaps most strikingly, the deal means that despite that storied history, a 10-figure investment by VW over 23 years of ownership and hundreds of Veyrons and Chirons delivered, Bugatti is valued at less than Rimac’s Nevera-making operation alone, which is only just beginning to deliver customer cars. The reason is simple: Bugatti is almost worthless without the ultrahigh-performance electric power train it will need in the EV age.
Volkswagen doesn’t want to make the investment required to develop one. Rimac has one already. Without it, VW was seriously considering putting the Bugatti brand into cold storage.
Even by the hyper-compressed standards of the young entrepreneurs remaking the modern world, this has been a wild few months for Mate Rimac. First the launch of the Nevera in June, then the Bugatti announcement in early July and, later that same month, marriage to his childhood sweetheart. Then a tour of the US, starting in Los Angeles and Pebble Beach in August, to meet not only customers for his $2.4 million Nevera but also Bugatti’s established clientele, who might be a little wary of both the brand’s transition to electric propulsion and its youthful new boss. Next he headed back to Zagreb to complete the transfer of power from Bugatti’s current CEO, the urbane Stephan Winkelmann, who also heads Lamborghini. Then he’ll continue the process of creating a successor for the Chiron.

“This year, just as you say, it’s like everything is coming together. It’s just f—— insane for me,” he tells me from New York. I’ve spoken with him several times over the past, mad few months: first spending a relaxed couple of days with him on the bleak but beautiful Croatian island of Pag, where he launched the Nevera, and later on that conference call. He looks tired now, after his fierce travel schedule. But he is typically generous with his time, disarmingly honest, asking questions as well as answering them, and generally personable, approachable, funny and human: atypical, perhaps, for a tech entrepreneur.
Every cent of that $2 billion net worth is self-made. Rimac was born in Bosnia to an ethnically Croatian family of migrant construction workers, a tradition of exodus accelerated by the vicious conflict that raged as Yugoslavia disintegrated. Rimac moved to Germany at age 2 and then to an independent Croatia in his early teens, where he was teased for his hick Bosnian accent. But his talent for electronic engineering was spotted and encouraged by a teacher, and by age 18 he had registered a couple of patents and won a national prize for an early example of wearable tech: a “glove” that recognized hand gestures and could be used instead of a mouse. It’s still on display in a cabinet at Rimac’s HQ.
Rimac liked cars as much as gadgets and bought a battered BMW 3 Series, as it was the cheapest way to get a rear-wheel- drive car that he could race and drift. His best friend, Goran, inadvertently gave a multibillion-dollar business its start when he blew the BMW’s engine, prompting its 20-year-old owner to combine his two passions and replace the gas engine with an electric motor. It worked okay but not well enough for Rimac, who pulled it out again and tinkered with it, beginning a constant process of obsessive iterative improvement over 13 years, which he admits drives him and his staff crazy but has now resulted in his owning the best high-performance EV propulsion tech in the world. And most of Bugatti.

I ask him to define what makes Rimac stand apart—what has brought so many established carmakers to Croatia in search of a way to make a fast EV quickly?
“Look at the Nevera,” he says. “Almost everything in it was developed internally. This is what makes us different. There is no other car company that has developed so many things in a car by themselves. And the second thing is execution. There are many other start-ups working on their cars. Many of them have existed longer than us, and all of them have more funding than us. But we are the first after Tesla who finished the car and started production. Execution is everything.
“And we do it for a fraction of the cost of others. It’s not because Croatian salaries are lower. It’s because we do things very differently from the other carmakers. And lastly, of course, it’s performance. There’s nobody even close to us.”

The Rimac Nevera monocoque, the biggest and stiffest single piece of carbon fiber in the automotive industry. 

Rimac Automobili

This is demonstrably true. In August a Nevera was independently tested at the Famoso dragstrip in California. The Bugatti Chiron Sport held the previous world production-car acceleration record, covering the quarter-mile in 9.4 seconds. The 1,914 hp Nevera ate up Famoso’s sticky tarmac in just 8.582 seconds at a terminal velocity of 167 mph. That 0.8 second difference is a lifetime in these matters: Now combustion engines will never catch up. The Tesla Model S Plaid faced off against the Nevera in three races a few days later and, though it also beat the Chiron’s time, as promised, with a top time of 9.272 seconds, it was a long way behind the Nevera.
The Nevera’s stellar price automatically puts it in the beyond-premium segment of the car market, and while it’s surprisingly comfortable and practical for something with such terrifying performance, it was never intended to be a luxury good. Bugatti is different, though, and this young, egalitarian, unpretentious electronic engineer is now in control of one of the world’s great luxury brands. The glamour of running a marque like Bugatti and delivering a luxury customer experience doesn’t seem to drive him; the question of whether he has plans to reinvent super-premium motoring as comprehensively as he has reinvented electric performance cars remains.

“For me, it’s more about cars and ecology,” he says. “For the Nevera, luxury was not really a concern: It’s more about tech and performance. Luxury is much more important to Bugatti. That’s why I think the two brands can coexist. Over the last 20 years, no other car had Bugatti’s performance. That’s what made them special. Then came craftsmanship, quality and details, but number one was performance. But now performance is increasingly commoditized. You have a five-seat sedan like the Model S being faster-accelerating than pretty much anything else on the road. So what puts you at the top of the pyramid in the future? Is it really just performance?
“Of course we’ll still do hypercars for Bugatti. We are working on a Chiron successor. But looking at Bugattis of the past, there haven’t been only sports cars. When performance alone is no longer the top selling point, what puts you at the pinnacle? Is it still a two-seat, rear-engine hypercar? Or might there be something else? There’s an opportunity for Bugatti in the future to have very interesting cars that are completely different to other models on the market, while Rimac remains a maker of very high-performance sports cars. But we haven’t figured that out ourselves yet.”
The details haven’t been officially confirmed, but there will be two all-new Bugattis engineered by Rimac before 2030. The first will be a 2,000 hp, two-seat hybrid hypercar, due around 2025. The Chiron’s 8.0-liter W-16 engine shorn of its four turbos will make half of that power and a Rimac electric-drive system the rest. Next comes a pure EV by 2030. From his hints, we may reasonably expect a four-door grand coupe to differentiate it from future Rimacs and to continue where Bugatti’s fabulous but ill-fated Royale of the 1930s left off.
Rimac will be involved in every aspect of their design. While his fellow Croat Adriano Mudri heads the company’s design department and Rimac’s specific expertise is in electric power trains, he obsesses over every aspect of his car’s design in the broadest sense.

The hypercar’s 4-motor drivetrain and 120 kwh battery pack. 

Rimac Automobili

“With a car, everything is important,” he says. “I define every little detail. The company is still very dependent on me for that, but I don’t think that’s good. I think that’s a personal failure.”
It’s clearly the cars, their design and engineering, and the environment that enthuse him. And given the tiny volumes in which his own cars will be made, his attention may begin to turn to some unexpected new projects where the ecological benefit is greater.
“I love hypercars. I love doing this stuff,” he says. “But in reality, it has a low impact on society. Electrification is an important step, but on its own it’s not going to save the world. I believe there are much bigger levers. In automotive terms, the big impact comes from new mobility, and we want to be a significant part of it. It doesn’t mean that we will stop doing what we are doing now, but for the last few years we’ve been working on a robot taxi service and the whole ecosystem around it. I don’t want to say too much about it. I’d rather do it and then show it. But you’ll see it early next year.”
His fellow supercar auteurs may be glad to see Rimac’s intellect and energy distracted by more pedestrian projects, though at this level there’s little conventional rivalry: Many of their customers can simply buy every model that interests them, and the marques are as likely to collaborate as compete. “It has been amazing to follow and support Mate’s rise,” says Christian von Koenigsegg, whose Regera uses Rimac’s batteries. “He has stayed true to his calling since a young age. For sure it was a big bet for us to trust such a young company and founder as a supplier. Neither Mate nor myself are traditional engineers, as we don’t have academic engineering backgrounds, but are more self-taught. I even think this might be a prerequisite for what we do as we are less limited in our thinking, and by working together we showed the big boys there is a new era coming.

“Bugatti always prided itself on being a part of a large group,” he continues. “We at Koenigsegg have always taken pride in standing on our own two feet. Now Bugatti has been taken over by a similar company with a similar philosophy to us, so now the extreme-sports car producers are more stand-alone than before. That’s a big shift. It’s interesting how the world changes.”
The world might be moving Rimac’s way, but there’s still risk. Those big contracts and the Bugatti deal make funding easy now, but he has to scale up fast, delivering power trains in far higher volumes than before and to perfect, German premium-marque quality levels from job one. By his own admission, he also has to make the business less dependent on him and maintain the energy and agility of a start-up while acquiring the scope of a proper, grown-up business. As even Elon Musk can attest, that’s not easy.
From New York, Rimac tells me that he has been looking at the stock tickers in Times Square and thinking again about an IPO. He doesn’t want to do it until he is shipping Neveras, fulfilling those new bigger contracts, has built his $240 million campus headquarters near Zagreb for the 2,500 employees he will have by 2023 and has revenues in the $600 million range, which will happen rather earlier.
He wonders if he made a mistake in not going public sooner. “This is my first job, you know?” he says. “I don’t know how many things I’m doing good, or how many things I’m doing very badly. I guess there must be both.” Given Rimac’s current valuation of around $6 billion, and potentially much more if the robotaxi bet comes in, his investors and the major carmakers seem to think he’s doing okay. Maybe he’ll wear shorts when he finally rings the Nasdaq opening bell.

What It’s Like to Drive the Rimac Nevera EV, the World’s Fastest-Accelerating Production Car

What It’s Like to Drive the Rimac Nevera EV, the World’s Fastest-Accelerating Production Car

With twice the power of a Formula 1 car, the ability to hit 60 mph in under two seconds and a $2.4 million sticker price, the new Rimac Nevera should intimidate even an experienced hypercar owner. Yet the automaker’s 33-year-old founder, Mate Rimac, intended his masterpiece to be a highly usable, no-fuss grand tourer. So which is it—Hyde or Jekyll? The answer from behind the wheel, amazingly, is both.

The Nevera is currently the world’s fastest-accelerating production car, but even such prodigious brute force is the result of sophisticated engineering. Rimac’s expertise in high-performance electric drivetrains is such that Porsche made a sizable investment in the company back in 2018. In July, Porsche’s parent company, the Volkswagen Group, gave the Croatian upstart controlling interest in storied French marque Bugatti, helping ensure that the carmaker famous for 1,000-plus hp W-16 engines has a future in the electric era. The new brand is called Bugatti-Rimac.

The rear view of the Rimac Nevera. 

KL-Photo

The Nevera’s dihedral doors provide plenty of curbside theater, but in a nice touch they also take much of the roof with them, making ingress and egress more graceful. The carbon-fiber monocoque chassis—the largest and stiffest ever used in a car—was designed to be narrow at the sills for the same reason.
Similarly, the interior aesthetic is more elegant than extreme, with silken leather, naked carbon fiber and sizable nuggets of aluminum that are CNC-milled in-house. Two huge screens provide a torrent of data on how both the Nevera and its driver are performing.
To cruise around town, use the rotary controller to select “D”—the most relaxed of the seven modes in terms of throttle response, suspension and steering—and the vehicle slips into traffic and glides over even poor surfaces with no more fuss than an Audi R8. Up the pace, though, and it’s impressive how effectively the vehicle’s tech compensates for the mass of its 120 kwh battery, the biggest currently fitted to a production car; the Nevera weighs in like an S-Class but handles as nimbly as a 911. With a motor on each wheel and a combined 1,914 hp, the car features power that can be shuffled to whichever corner needs it, pulling the inside wheel tight to the apex if you want to be neat or blasting it out of the rear tires in a colossal smoky drift if you don’t.

The vibrant interior of the hypercar. 

Ivan Lackovic

Because it’s all-electric, that extraordinary output is available instantly. When you do have a chance to deploy it in its entirety, be prepared: A straight, dry track will work in a pinch, but a runway is better. Because what happens next doesn’t feel violent, exactly—each of the four electric motors matches its output perfectly to the available grip—as much as alien, non-automotive. As the rate of acceleration just keeps climbing and climbing, instead of tailing off, you feel like you’re no longer in a car—it wakes that primal part of the brain that tells you that you’ve fallen off a cliff.
At full steam, the Nevera is far from the stereotype of a silent EV, with 1.4 megawatts actually screaming through the car. The noise adds to the drama, as much psychological as physical, in a way no other road car can match, making for a dangerously charismatic split personality worth every one of its seven figures.

Watch: The Rimac Nevera EV Easily Smoked the Tesla Model S Plaid in a Drag Race

Watch: The Rimac Nevera EV Easily Smoked the Tesla Model S Plaid in a Drag Race

It turns out 900 horses make a big difference.

The two quickest production cars of all time, the Rimac Nevera and the Tesla Model S, were recently pitted against each other in a series of drag races, with the former coming out on top easily. The difference between the two, besides a whole lot of power and money? Six-tenths of a second.
The two EVs can be seen racing each other three times in a new video posted by DragTimes, the same YouTuber that recently filmed the Nevera as it became the fastest accelerating production car of all time. In all three heats, the American EV was no match for the Croatian counterpart.

Rimac Nevera electric hypercar 

Rimac

In the first race, the Tesla gets off to a fast start building up a solid lead before being overtaken by Rimac’s battery-powered speed machine, which ends up winning by several car lengths. The Nevera covers the quarter-mile in 8.655 seconds at a speed of 166.66 mph, while the Model S Plaid does the same in 9.272 seconds at a speed of 152.68 mph—a difference of 0.617 seconds. That was easily the most dramatic of the trio of heats. In races two and three, the Nevera gets out to a fast start and wins by 0.671 seconds and 0.679 seconds, respectively.
But were those results really ever in doubt? Sure, the Nevera and Model S Plaid are both speedy are fully electric, but that’s about all they have in common. Rimac’s EV is a hypercar with a quad-motor powertrain that can generate 1,914 hp, and it costs $2.4 million. Meanwhile, the Model S Plaid is a sedan with a tri-motor powertrain that generates 1,020 hp and starts at $124,000.

Tesla Model S Plaid 

Tesla

The Tesla, it should be said, deserves credit for holding its own, despite being outmatched and weighing 100 more pounds than the Nevera. Its quarter-mile times of 9.272, 9.312 and 9.294 seconds are all incredibly impressive for a stock production sedan. The truth is few EVs in its class will be able to keep up with it.
Be that as it may, you can add at least one other name to the list of high-powered cars that have smoked the Model S Plaid in a drag race. A gas-powered Shelby GT showed no mercy to Tesla’s fastest car in July.

The Rimac Nevera Just Set the Production Car Quarter-Mile Record

The Rimac Nevera Just Set the Production Car Quarter-Mile Record

The Rimac Nevera may be even quicker than we thought.

Before making its US debut at Monterey Car Week, the Rimac team decided to swing by Famoso Raceway in McFarland, California, and see what its battery-powered hypercar could do. By the end of the day, the EV had become the fastest accelerating production vehicle—and it was all captured on video by YouTuber DragTimes.

The Croatian manufacturer’s electric speed machine may only be a couple months old but it’s already a record setter. During its 11th run of the day (at 19:06 in the above video), a Nevera driven by the YouTuber, whose real name is Brooks Weiselblat, covered the quarter-mile in just 8.58 seconds at 167.51 mph. That number bests the previous record of 9.25 seconds, which was set by the Tesla Model S Plaid earlier this summer, by more than a half second. It also beat Rimac’s previous best quarter-mile time of 8.62 seconds.

Rimac Nevera before its record-setting quarter-mile run 

DragTimes/YouTube

Of course, as tends to be with these kind of things, there’s a not insignificant caveat. The record was set on a VHT-prepped surface, points out Road & Track. VHT is a synthetic resin that helps increase traction. But, any advantage that may have been gained by the raceway’s surface also may have been offset by the set of Michelin Pilot Sport 4S tires the Nevera was riding on. While excellent tires, they’re not exactly drag racing slicks. It’s possible that with different tires the car could have been even quicker.
That the Rimac is capable of such jaw-dropping performance numbers shouldn’t really surprise anyone. The hypercar is powered by a fully electric powertrain with a 120-kWh battery and four motors that can generate 1,914 horsepower and 1,740 lbs of torque. At the time of its unveiling, the brand promised it could go from zero to 60 mph in 1.97 seconds. That and its quarter-mile time are both faster than the Model S Plaid, so don’t be surprised if Elon Musk becomes fixated on the EV in the near future.
Now the real onto the real question, though: can it beat a modified Shelby GT500 in a drag race?

Bugatti and Croatian Electric Supercar Startup Rimac Merge in New Deal

Bugatti and Croatian Electric Supercar Startup Rimac Merge in New Deal

After months of speculation, Bugatti and Rimac have officially joined forces.

On Monday, the Volkswagen Group announced that it was relinquishing control of the storied marque it has owned for more than two decades. The French hypercar specialists will now be part of Bugatti-Rimac, a new joint operation that will be run by the Croatian EV startup and Porsche, according to The New York Times.

The Volkswagen Group first bought Bugatti out of bankruptcy back in 1998. The marque was always an odd fit at the company and was a chronic money loser despite producing acclaimed supercars, like the Chiron, with seven-figure price tags. That might explain why rumors have swirled over the past year about whether or not Rimac or Porsche, which is also owned by Volkswagen Group, would take control of the brand.

The Porsche Taycan, Rimac Nevera and Bugatti Chiron 

Volkswagen Group

In the end, it will be both. Although no financial terms have been disclosed, Rimac will own 55 percent of the new venture, while Porsche will own 45 percent. The two companies have a working relationship that goes back three years, with Porsche directly owning 24 percent of Rimac, according to a press release. Assuming that the transaction is  approved by antitrust authorities in several countries, Bugatti-Rimac will officially launch in the fourth quarter of this year. The new company will be led by Rimac founder Mate Rimac and will be based out of Croatia, though Bugatti will maintain its historic headquarters in Molsheim, France.
“We are combining Bugatti’s strong expertise in the hypercar business with Rimac’s tremendous innovative strength in the highly promising field of electric mobility,” Porsche chairman Oliver Blume said in a statement. “Bugatti is contributing a tradition-rich brand, iconic products, a loyal customer base and a global dealer organization to the joint venture. In addition to technology, Rimac is providing new development and organizational approaches.”
The first cars produced under the Bugatti-Rimac name will be the combustion Chiron and battery-powered Nevera. The 1,900 hp EV won’t be the first fully electric Bugatti, however. Instead, Motor1.com reports that the company intends to build the marque’s first battery-powered hypercar, which is expected to debut before decade’s end, from the ground up.

The All-Electric 1900 HP Rimac Nevera Hypercar Is Here to Make You Forget Your V-12

The All-Electric 1900 HP Rimac Nevera Hypercar Is Here to Make You Forget Your V-12

If you ever doubted the viability of all-electric hypercars, Rimac wants to give you a little  certitude.

On Tuesday, the Croatian automaker finally unveiled the renamed production version of its buzzy C_Two concept, the Nevera. Named after a quick and unexpected type of Mediterranean storm, the high-tech speed machine may just change the way we think about EVs and what they can do.

That’s because the Nevera’s all-electric drivetrain is as just capable as the brawniest V-12, maybe even more so. The car’s setup includes a 120-kWh battery, a single-speed gearbox and four surface-mounted permanent magnet motors, one on each wheel, that combine to produce a staggering 1,914 horsepower and 1,740 ft lbs of torque. That’s three times as powerful as a “conventional-engined” supercar, according to the marque.

Rimac

Thanks to this, the car can jet to 62 mph in 1.97 seconds, to 100 mph in 4.3 seconds and to 186 mph in 11.6 seconds. It’ll also be able to cover a quarter-mile in 8.6 seconds, which the brand claims is a record for a supercar, and reach a top speed of 250 mph. Those figures would easily make it one of the fastest production vehicles of all time, but it should be noted that the brand says they were achieved on a high-friction surface with a one-foot rollout, according to Motor1.com. That means you might not be able to replicate them on your next track day, but you should come pretty close.

Rimac

As for range, Rimac says it expects the car will be able to drive 340 miles on a single charge, based on the WLTP testing standard. That would be remarkable, especially for a performance car with this level of power. But it’s hard to imagine the car will actually come close to that figure, especially if you’re putting its quad-motor powertrain to the test. When the Nevera is low on juice, though, charging should be quick. The marque says the liquid-cooled, lithium-manganese-nickel battery pack can go from zero to 80-percent capacity in just 19 minutes when using a DC fast charger. No word yet on how long it will take to charge it using a regular charger.
Other noteworthy features include what the brand is calling the world’s “most advanced carbon-fiber monocoque.” Weighing in at just over 440 pounds, it’s the largest single piece of carbon fiber ever used in the car and will help reduce weight (which will still be substantial) while increasing structural rigidity. There’s also an all-new All-Wheel Torque Vectoring 2 system in place of the traditional electronic stability program and traction control system. It will optimize handling by calibrating the torque delivered to each wheel. Finally, to help bring the Nevera to a stop, Rimac has developed a regenerative braking system that consists of a electro-hydraulic booster, a pedal feel simulator, carbon-ceramic Brembo rotors and six-piston calipers.

Inside the Rimac Nevera 

Rimac

The Nevera doesn’t look radically different from the C_Two concept, but has been revised in small ways to maximize aerodynamic performance. With flowing lines and a large rear wing, the car still looks like a fairly standard supercar even if it is sleeker than before. Thanks to the subtle modifications the car is 34 percent more aerodynamic than before, and cooling to both the powertrain and brakes has been increased. One thing that has remained thankfully unchanged: the vehicle’s striking butterfly doors.
Inside the car, carbon fiber and leather abound, as well as six different digital screens. There are the standard instrument panel and large center infotainment screen and four configurable screens designed to improve the driving experience and rid the vehicle of needless toggles and switches. Two additional screens tucked into the driver’s cockpit will allow you to monitor every aspect of the car and drive with a simple tap of the finger. Meanwhile, from the infotainment screen you’ll be able to access Rimac’s first-of-its-kind AI Drivers coach, which utilizes 12 ultrasonic sensors, 13 cameras and six radars. The futuristic feature, which will be available next year via an over-the-air update, will evaluate your driving to help maximize performance.

Rimac

“This is the car I had in mind when I embarked on the ‘impossible’ journey 10 years ago,” the marque’s founder, Mate Rimac, said in a statement. “All our hard work has resulted in the Nevera—our record-breaking hypercar. This car was born to outperform, and to raise the bar, redefining the norm for performance cars. And not only in performance—but as an all-around package.”
Rimac plans to build 150 Neveras, the first of which will be delivered later this year. The brand says there are still some slots available in the production run. Unsurprisingly, the car doesn’t come cheap, with the price reported to start at $2.4 million.

PHP Code Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com