Restomod

First Drive: This Porsche 911 Restomod Seamlessly Blends Old-School Grunt With Modern Refinement

First Drive: This Porsche 911 Restomod Seamlessly Blends Old-School Grunt With Modern Refinement

Many Porsche restomods follow the same formula: start with a 964 or big-bumper G Series 911, then “backdate” it to look like an early 1970s 911S or 2.7 RS. Broadly speaking, that’s the approach the Paul Stephens restoration house has taken with its bespoke AutoArt cars since 2002. Now, however, the UK specialist has changed direction with a restomod that rejects nostalgia and sees the classic 911 through a contemporary lens. Meet the 993R.

Based on the final evolution of the air-cooled Porsche 911 (made from 1994 through 1998), the 993R goes back to the future with a range of upgrades from later, water-cooled GT models. Paul Stephens explains that the brief was to “take a Carrera and uplift everything by 25 percent.” Inspiration came from the “less is more” ethos of the cult-classic 911R, both the 1967 original and its 2016 sequel.

The 993R, a restomod Porsche 911 from Paul Stephens. 

Courtesy of Paul Stephens.

Despite having more power (330 hp) and less weight (2,690 pounds with fluids), the 993R is resolutely focused for the street. On narrow UK roads in particular, that means slim hips are best, so each build will start with a Carrera 2, rather than the Carrera 4 with its wider haunches. Incidentally, both cars still have a smaller footprint than today’s 718 Cayman.
Taken back to bare metal, the 911’s shell is seam-welded for strength and its rain gutters are removed to improve aerodynamics (a trick Porsche used on the 959 supercar, aiding towards its 197 mph top speed). The fiberglass front and rear bumpers are made in-house and weigh just 20 pounds each, while the elongated rear spoiler has ram-air vents like a 996 GT3. And Porsche Motorsport’s thinner glass helps save a few pounds, too.

Despite having racy specs like 330 hp while weighing only 2,690 pounds (with fluids), the 993R has been resolutely focused for the road. 

Courtesy of Paul Stephens.

The 993R’s adjustable suspension is also sourced from the racing department in Weissach, and combines with Tractive Ace adaptive dampers (also standard equipment for Ruf and Pagani). Stephens didn’t want a glaring touchscreen bolted to the 993R’s dashboard, so a simple twist-knob offers five preset levels of ride stiffness. In a rare case of newer wheels looking right on an older car, the 18-inch rims come from a 996 GT3 RS. Wrapped in Michelin Pilot Sport tires, they cover the stronger “Big Red” brakes of the 993 Carrera RS.
Lift the lid of a regular 993 and its 3.6-liter flat-six is barely visible beneath a muddle of ugly black plastic. The “R” revision from Stephens, by contrast, has an exquisite engine bay worthy of a show car. The view is now dominated by a polished 996 GT3 plenum, individual throttle bodies and a 993R-branded shroud for the fan, while the air-con system (now electric) has moved to the front trunk to improve weight distribution.

Wrapped in Michelin Pilot Sport tires, the 18-inch rims come from the 996 GT3 and cover brakes from the 993 Carrera RS. 

Courtesy of Paul Stephens.

Expanded to 3.8 liters, the engine also uses 993 RSR pistons, custom camshafts, Pauter lightweight conrods, solid Porsche Motorsport lifters and a 997 GT3 crankshaft and oil pump. Peak power arrives at 7,400 rpm, with the limiter likely to be fixed just beyond 8,000 rpm. “It’s an engine that was designed to rev,” explains Stephens. “Turbocharging or supercharging was never an option. You need to work for the power and feel it build.”
Inside, the 993R is simple but beautifully effective. Most of the panels have been reconstructed from fiberglass to ensure a flawless fit, then retrimmed in soft Italian leather. Formerly plastic parts such as the column stalks and heater controls (even the ignition key) are replaced by cool-to-the touch aluminum. There’s a USB for charging your phone, but no infotainment—though it’s an option, according to Stephens. So too is a “Touring” specification, with rear seats rather than the half roll cage filling the back.

The 3.8-liter flat-six features a polished 996 GT3 plenum, individual throttle bodies and a 993R-branded shroud for the fan. 

Courtesy of Paul Stephens.

The air-cooled engine sounds angry and insistent at idle, its single-mass flywheel rattling like a race car. It soon settles down on the move, though, with 2022-spec sound deadening to muffle the commotion. Only when you get beyond 5,000 rpm does the 993R begin to truly sing: a hard-edged, visceral howl that feels as physical as it is acoustic. Infotainment? Who needs it?
Paul Stephens will offer a 360 hp version of this engine, along with a 4.0-liter unit that could top 400 hp. For the road, however, in a car that weighs 331 pounds less than a stock 993 Carrera 2, you really don’t need more. The 993R is hugely tractable, without the low-speed stutter or shunt that afflicts some tuned flat-sixes, and its notchy six-speed manual gearbox is a joy to use. The throttle even has a special tab to help you heel-and-toe. And as for a zero-to-60 mph time, 4.5 seconds is what can be expected, plus a top speed north of 170 mph.

For the interior, most of the panels have been reconstructed from fiberglass then retrimmed in soft Italian leather. 

Courtesy of Paul Stephens.

The 993R is still unmistakably a 911 to drive. There are quirks, such as the floor-hinged pedals, the upright windshield and the steering wheel that obscures half the dials. But more fundamentally, there’s the sense of weight transfer, of throttle-adjustable balance and the wonderful tactility through the Momo wheel. English country lanes are a notoriously tough test, yet with the shocks on their second-softest setting, the car didn’t bump or thump once. “We wanted it to be daily drivable,” says Stephens. Mission accomplished.

The elongated rear spoiler has ram-air vents like a 996 GT3. 

Courtesy of Paul Stephens.

In truth, I can’t think of many cars I’d rather drive every day. The 993R delivers a brilliant blend of old-school thrills with just enough modern luxury and civility. If Porsche had built a 993 GT3, I suspect it would have looked something like this. A starting price of around $480,000 (plus a donor car) pushes the cost of a Paul Stephens restomod into the realm of serious supercars. And like the latter, with only a handful likely to be built each year, it will remain a rare and special sight.
Click here to see all the photos of the Paul Stephens 993R Restomod.

The Paul Stephens 993R restomod based on the Porsche 993. 

Meet the ‘White Rhino,’ Classic Overland’s Newest Bonkers 6×6 Land Rover Defender

Meet the ‘White Rhino,’ Classic Overland’s Newest Bonkers 6×6 Land Rover Defender

Classic Overland wants you to know there’s no reason to stop at four wheels.

The Georgia-based Land Rover restoration experts have just unveiled their latest 6×6, the “White Rhino.” The new build is based on an old truck used to carry fire fighters in South Africa and is easily one of the shop’s most impressive yet.
The “White Rhino” follows in the footsteps of Classic Overland’s equally striking “Project Black Mamba” utility vehicle from a few years back. Like its predecessor, it’s based on a Defender truck that started out life as a 6×6. But just because the company didn’t have to add another set of wheels to the off-roader doesn’t mean it hasn’t been thoroughly upgraded inside and out.

The original truck the Classic Overland “White Rhino” Land Rover Defender is based on 

Classic Overland

The biggest change is that the 6×6’s specially tuned 3.5-liter V-8 has been swapped out for a supercharged 6.2-liter LT4 mill sourced from GM. The beastly mill is mated to a 10-speed automatic transmission and can pump out up to 682 horses. That’s more than enough muscle to use it as a specialty off-roader, but we won’t blame you if you just want to used it as your daily driver.
Whatever you end up using it for, the “White Rhino” is sure to turn heads. Classic Overland has finished the off-roader in a brilliant coat of Icy White, which is offset by matte black accents. The vehicle has also been equipped with LED lights, a snorkel, custom step bars, a winch and rides on a set of all-black Kahn Mondial Retro wheels wrapped in chunky all-terrain tires. The shop hasn’t shared images of the interior, but says it will be covered in premium leather. Whether it’s fresh out the car wash or covered in mud from your last adventure, it’ll look the part.

Classic Overland

If you’re looking to add a classic off-roader restomod with real character to your garage, there aren’t many better options right now than the “White Rhino.” Classic Overland is aware of what it has on its hands, though. That’s why the build starts at $400,000. You can also ask them to build a completely different Defender too.
Click here to see all the photos of the Classic Overland “White Rhino” Land Rover Defender 6×6.

The Classic Overland “White Rhino” 6×6 in Photos 

Classic Overland

Singer’s New Custom Porsche 911 Is a Funky, Turbocharged Ride

Singer’s New Custom Porsche 911 Is a Funky, Turbocharged Ride

Singer Vehicle Design’s latest Porsche 911 restomod is a minty fresh beauty.

On Wednesday, the restoration house revealed the latest model from its Turbo Study program. Through the offering, owners can customize a 911 to their heart’s desire. Earlier this year, that resulted in a Wolf Blue car focusing on grand touring. Now the latest model is leaning into the vehicle’s sportier side, with a Turbo Racing White body and mint-green racing stripes all the way down the top.

“This specification underlines the wide range of high-performance capability enabled by the study—from refined grand touring to visceral sports focus,” the company said in its announcement.

A look at the rear view 

Singer Vehicle Design/Facebook

Of course, you want a sporty car to reach sporty speeds, so the new 911 features a power increase to 510 horses from the previous version’s 450 hp, according to Road & Track. That comes from the 3.8-liter, twin-turbocharged, air-cooled flat-six, which also has air-to-water intercooling. Meanwhile, the suspension has been sport-calibrated and the ride height has been lowered and stiffened for better aerodynamics and handling.
On the outside of the vehicle, you’ll find lightweight carbon-fiber bodywork and visual carbon-fiber elements on the front splitter, the shark-fin intake and the whale-tail spoiler. Both the rear bumperettes and rear wiper have been removed, helping to emphasize the back’s extra track width. Singer has also added its signature center-mounted fuel filler, which was missing from its earlier 911 restomod.

A peek at the funky interior 

Singer Vehicle Design/Facebook

Inside, the car is decked out in a funky bespoke houndstooth “Grun” cloth that matches the minty color on the exterior. Up front, there are lightweight carbon-fiber seats, while a roll cage has taken the place of the typical rear seats. Elsewhere, you’ll notice lightweight door trims, painted interior surfaces and carbon-fiber accents on the instrument panel.
Singer noted that the new 911 highlights the wide range of personalization available through its Turbo Study program, so if you’ve been looking to drive something that truly no one else has, now’s your chance to make that happen.

Jaguar Created a Very Patriotic 1965 E-Type Restomod for the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee

Jaguar Created a Very Patriotic 1965 E-Type Restomod for the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee

The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee wasn’t just an opportunity for the British people to celebrate their 96-year-old monarch, it also gave Jaguar the chance to showcase its latest official restomod.

The marque’s restoration division, Jaguar Classic, debuted a beautiful 1965 Series 1 E-type roadster just in time for the event’s 15-car pageant on Sunday. The one-of-a-kind rebuild isn’t just meant to be a reminder of the brand’s glory days; it’s also proof that it can take the cars from that era and get them into near-new condition.

The restomod was commissioned by an anonymous Jag lover who was looking for a Series 1 E-Type convertible built the same year they were born. The automaker went a step further, sourcing an example that originally rolled off the line just two days after their 1965 birthday. That wasn’t all the enthusiast wanted, though. They also wanted the sports car finished in a custom hue of blue inspired by the Union jack and have a leather interior covered in red leather the same shade as that found on the UK’s famous post boxes.

Inside the Jaguar Classic E-type restomod 

Jaguar

The open-top roadster also has its fair share of modern-day upgrades. The original headlamps were replaced with a set of powerful LED lights, while the interior is equipped with the Jaguar Classic infotainment system. It doesn’t have all the bells and whistles found on the brand’s current lineup of vehicles, but it has a small touchscreen that can be used for navigation and offers Bluetooth support.
The biggest modification, though, can be found under the car’s long-nosed hood. Sitting in the engine bay is a 4.7-liter straight-six mated to a five-speed manual gearbox. No power figures have been released, but the new mill is a half-liter bigger than that of the original car, which could produce 261 horse. It seems like a safe bet that this one—which Jaguar says delivers “superior” performance—can generate even more.  Other mechanical upgrades include a sports exhaust and manifold that ensure you can hear this Jaguar’s roar.

The 1965 E-Type used as the basis for the restomod 

Jaguar

“You sense the history and knowledge when you enter the Jaguar Classic Works facility and even after several visits, I still get excited to be in the building,” the vehicle’s owner said in a statement. “I’m so proud of the car the passionate team there has created, and I’m privileged to be part of its story.”

Per tradition, Jaguar has not revealed a price for the bespoke E-type. The 3.8-liter continuations the brand started selling last year through its E-type 60 Collection program start at $440,000, however. We suspect this one, which comes with much bigger engine and a spot in the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee Pageant, will cost a fair bit more.
Check out more images of the E-type restomod below:

Jaguar

Jaguar

Jaguar

Jaguar

Meet ‘Hellucination,’ Speedkore’s Latest Menacing 1,000 HP Dodge Charger Restomod

Meet ‘Hellucination,’ Speedkore’s Latest Menacing 1,000 HP Dodge Charger Restomod

Speedkore knows exactly how to get the best out of a classic American performance vehicle.

The custom shop was enlisted by Stellantis design chief Ralph Gilles to help reimagine his 1968 Dodge Charger. The resulting restomod has been dubbed “Hellucination” and it’s as fast as it is mean thanks its 1,000 hp powerplant.
It makes sense that Gilles would turn to Speedkore to give the legendary muscle car some new life. Last year, the Wisconsin-based tuner built a similar car for Kevin Hart, though that one was based on the 1970 model year version of Dodge’s storied bruiser. The funnyman’s restomod is nicknamed “Hellraiser” because of its massive 426 Hemi engine and sinister blacked-out look.

Inside the 7.0-liter Hellephant V-8 

Speedkore

Speedkore’s latest Charger restomod is powered by a 7.0-liter Hellephant V-8 mated to an eight-speed ZF automatic gearbox. The engine in Gilles’s car may be different than the one in Hart’s, but both pump out a hair-raising 1,000 horses. The vehicle is built on top of a Speedkore frame with perimeter reinforcements and has carbon-fiber body panels, as well as a hood, floor pan and wheel-well tubs made from the same material. Gilles also had the coupé outfitted with a double A-arm front suspension from Detroit Speed and a custom-made four-bar diagonal link setup in the back.
While muscle car aficionados will be able to spot all the subtle differences between the two Chargers, there’s no denying that Hart’s and Gilles’s rides look strikingly similar. But, with these two models, the devil is definitely in the details. The designer’s muscle car may look black from a distance but its carbon-fiber body has actually been finished in a glossy clear coat that allows you to see the material beneath. The headlamps and rear lights have also been replaced by Dapper Lighting LEDs that cast a ghostly glow. Finally, it rides on a set of custom-made HRE wheels wrapped in Michelin Pilot Sports 4S tires.
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Inside the Hellucination you’ll find a carbon-fiber dashboard, door panels and seat backs. The vehicle’s two seats were made by Gabe’s Custom Interior and are done up in black and gray with orange contrast stitching, as is it’s the three spoke steering wheel which has the Speedkore logo at its center. The cabin has also been equipped with a 2,000-watt, six-speaker Kicker audio system.
Unsurprisingly, Speedkore hasn’t announced how much Gilles’s Charger cost to build, but did say it spent two years working on the vehicle, according to Road & Track. No price was announced for Hart’s Hellraiser, either, though a TMZ report at the time put the cost at “several hundred thousand dollars.” We’d imagine the Hellucination’s price tag is in the same neighborhood.

Check out more photos of the Hellucination below:

Speedkore

Speedkore

Speedkore

Speedkore

Speedkore

Who Says Volvos Are Boring? This Sporty All-Electric P1800 Restomod Will Star at Monterey Car Week

Who Says Volvos Are Boring? This Sporty All-Electric P1800 Restomod Will Star at Monterey Car Week

One of the coolest Volvos in recent memory is coming to the US.

Cyan Racing will bring its gorgeous P1800 restomod stateside for this year’s Monterey Car Week, according to Motor1.com. Car enthusiasts in the US won’t just get the chance to admire the car up close, though. They’ll also be able to snap up one of their own.
Volvo may be best known for the safety and reliability of its vehicles, but there have been times during its 95-year history when it has let loose and had some fun. Perhaps no car is a better illustration of this than the P1800. The zippy coupé was in production from 1961 to 1974 and featured an Italian-inspired design that sets it apart from nearly every other car the marque has ever built. Two years ago, Cyan Racing, fresh off a three straight World Touring Car Championships, decided to resurrect the vehicle. Their goal? To build a 1960s-era racer using today’s technology.

Inside the Volvo P1800 Cyan 

Cyan Racing

With the exception of the body shape and a few key elements—like the steel from the original chassis, the handbrake and the windshield wipers—the rest of the P1800 has been rebuilt from the ground up. The resulting vehicle has a wider track, larger wheel wells and a body made primarily of carbon-fiber panels. Thanks to all these modifications, the restomod tips the scales at just 2,183 pounds.
The biggest change, of course, can be found under the hood. Cyan Racing has swapped out the P1800’s original engine for a turbocharged 4.0-liter four-cylinder similar to the mill found in Volvo’s S60 TC1 race car. The engine is mated to a Hollinger five-speed manual and generates 400 horses, 336 ft lbs of twist and has a redline of 7,600 rpm. That’s right, it’s a stick shift in case the purists needed even more reason to get excited. It also features a limited-slip differential, also from Hollinger, and a new rear-wheel drive system. One of the shop’s goals was to improve connection between the driver and the road, so its restomod deliberately lacks stability control, ABS and a brake booster.

The P1800 Cyan’s new four-cylinder engine 

Cyan Racing

The P1800 Cyan will make its US debut at The Quail, a Motorsports Gathering 2022. The event is one of the highlights of Monterey Car Week and will be held on August 9. You’ll also be able to buy the restomod directly from Cyan Racing. The $700,000 price tag is $200,000 more than when the car was first announced in 2020, but it’s still less expensive than building a time machine to travel back to the Swinging Sixties.

Check out more images of the P1800 Cyan below:

Cyan Racing

Cyan Racing

Cyan Racing

Cyan Racing

First Drive: This Mercedes-Benz R107 Restomod Pairs 1980s Mojo with Modern Performance

First Drive: This Mercedes-Benz R107 Restomod Pairs 1980s Mojo with Modern Performance

The Mercedes-Benz R107, more commonly known to the public as the SL that was on sale from 1971 until 1989, had the longest production life of any model from the German marque, apart from the original G-Wagen. Yet for those of a certain age, myself included, this will always be the Dallas SL. Driven by the character Bobby Ewing in the prime-time TV show, it seemed to epitomize 1980s glamor and success.

This 1989 300 SL restomod looks near-stock and wears the same Signal Red paint as Ewing’s famous 450 SL, but the fictional Texas oil baron would likely be dumbfounded by how it drives. The UK-based SL Shop has modified the R107 from an easygoing cruiser into a genuine sports car.

A 1989 Mercedes-Benz R107 restomod from UK-based SL Shop. 

Craig Pusey, courtesy of SL Shop.

Located in the English city of Stratford-upon-Avon, SL Shop is one of the world’s leading classic SL specialists. At the time of my visit, it has around 60 cars for sale—mostly the R107 and its W113 “Pagoda” predecessor—plus many more in various stages of restoration. Highlights include several R107s converted to endurance rally spec, plus a lone 300 SEL 6.3: the first Mercedes-Benz modified by AMG.
The SL Shop’s SportLine conversion is a long way from the European muscle cars that swiftly became AMG’s calling card. “Our goal was to make sympathetic and respectful upgrades,” explains SL Shop’s Francis Robertson-Marriott. “It blends the R107’s classic character with modern handling and performance.” This isn’t a full Singer-style reimagining, in other words, but a relatively subtle twist on the restomod recipe.
From the outside, the only obvious giveaway is the SL’s lowered ride height, achieved via coilover springs with custom Bilstein shocks. Most vehicles would look slammed after a 3.2-inch suspension drop, but the regular R107 has so much fresh air beneath its arches that the 15-inch alloys still have plenty of space. Parked between two oh-so-pretty Pagodas, the SportLine’s broad shoulders and squared-off stance are even more striking.

Sporting a curb weight of 3,100 pounds, the car sprints from zero to 60 mph in 5.9 seconds and tops out at 169 mph. 

Craig Pusey, courtesy of SL Shop.

When it left Stuttgart, Germany, 33 years ago, the SL was fit with a 3.0-liter M103 straight-six engine that mustered a modest 185 hp and 118 ft lbs of torque. Today, those figures have rocketed to 255 hp and 250 ft lbs of torque. Upgrades include a ported and polished cylinder head, spikier camshaft, lightened flywheel, redesigned throttle body, bigger injectors and a stainless-steel exhaust. With a curb weight of 3,100 pounds, the car sprints from zero to 60 mph in 5.9 seconds and tops out at 169 mph—truly in a different performance league from the stock R107, which manages the same rate of acceleration in 9.6 seconds and can reach 126 mph.

Opening the reassuringly heavy door, I immediately spot the stick shift—quite a rarity on an R107. The five-speed manual transmission comes from an early Mercedes C-Class, with closely stacked ratios for livelier acceleration. That aside, the beautifully retrimmed interior looks almost original. There are red stripes on the seatbelts and white SportLine dials, but you’ll search in vain for a touchscreen or any token slabs of carbon fiber. Plush leather and polished wood are the order of the day here.

The 3.0-liter M103 straight-six engine now musters 255 hp and 250 ft lbs of torque. 

Craig Pusey, courtesy of SL Shop.

Twist the key and the car announces its presence with a resonant rumble that’s more V-8 than straight-six. The driving position is quite upright, the large steering wheel is offset towards the center and the soft seats offer little side support. Then there’s the long hood, which necessitates threading the car carefully through SL Shop’s packed parking lot. First impressions don’t exactly scream sports car.
That changes when you reach an open road, though. The gearshift is pleasingly notchy and mechanical, and a shortened throttle linkage elicits an instant response. The modified engine feels muscular in the mid-range, then pulls with real urgency to its 7,000 rpm limiter (extended by 1,000 rpm, hence the custom tachometer). As for the engine soundtrack, the custom twin-pipe exhaust totally transforms it into a searing metallic snarl that gets under your skin like a hungry mosquito.

With no touchscreen or token display of carbon fiber, the beautifully retrimmed interior looks almost original. 

Craig Pusey, courtesy of SL Shop.

The biggest surprise, however, is how the SL handles. The original car is so relaxed it’s almost somnambulant, but the SportLine conversion feels wide awake. Its chassis is focused and tenacious, with limited body roll and plenty of grip. It encourages you to attack corners at speeds that would have a normal R107 squealing in protest. And crucially, it does so without ruining the ride, which is taut but still supple.
If there’s a chink in the armor, it’s the recirculating ball steering. Despite tweaks by SL Shop, it can’t offer the directness or clarity of, say, a classic Porsche 911. Then again, the R107 is a better long-distance cruiser than any air-cooled 911, with roomier rear seats and a far more practical trunk. It’s also a less obvious starting point for a restomod, yet the end-product is every bit as cool and covetable.

The custom twin-pipe exhaust helps give the engine soundtrack a searing metallic snarl. 

Craig Pusey, courtesy of SL Shop.

This particular example is currently for sale at $160,000, or SL Shop can build one to your exact specification—including the donor car—starting at $185,000. You can also buy the various SportLine parts separately to convert your own SL. My advice? Do it while the R107 is still undervalued, as prices for the Pagoda are now stratospheric. And go for Dallas red, obviously.

Classic 9 Motorwerks Modernizes an Original Porsche Hot Rod

Classic 9 Motorwerks Modernizes an Original Porsche Hot Rod

Jim and Jason Faulkner, the father and son co-founders of Classic 9 Motorwerks, together share decades of combined Porsche racing experience and have now built a reputation with their careful and correct Porsche 911 restorations. About their mission, the elder Faulkner, who also brings an aesthetic sensibility honed by more than 25 years as a practicing architect, says, “We envisioned Classic 9 Motorwerks as a business that honors Porsche’s legendary racing heritage.”

In tribute to that history, Classic 9 made some big noise at the 2020 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, as well as at Luft 7 last September, showing its hand-built jewel-box of a car, the C9 RS Turbo. Wearing Outlaw Gray paint and red graphics, the sleek-but-familiar shape attracted Porsche enthusiasts who appreciate the meticulous execution and creativity of a no-holds-barred 911 build.

The C9 RS Turbo restomod from Classic 9 Motorwerks. 

Photo: Courtesy of Classic 9 Motorwerks.

About the genesis of the C9 RS Turbo, the younger Faulkner explained, “Our car is an evolution of the 1973 Porsche 911 RS, and is inspired by Porsche’s 911 RSR Turbo race car.” Porsche’s first 911 Turbo came to market in 1975, with the factory needing 400 examples to homologate its 911 for Group 4 racing. But public demand was fierce and, eventually, about 21,000 G-Series 911 Turbos were made through 1989, when production changed to the then-new 964 iteration of the 911. But the first 911 Turbos for the street—more properly designated by internal type number 930—were as intense as the public’s demand for them. It was a car that did not suffer fools, as ferocious as a drowsy gila monster that awakens instantly, snapping around and biting an inattentive or inexperienced handler.

The power plant is a 3.0-liter, twin-plug turbocharged flat-six engine. 

Photo: Courtesy of Classic 9 Motorwerks.

Looking back, the evergreen 911 is longer-lived than even the oldest gila (36 years in captivity), and so Classic 9 can use a donor chassis (furnished by the customer) from two decades of 911 production, spanning 1969 to 1989. In the spirit of the Porsche factory’s 1973 Carrera RS, the C9 RS Turbo is offered in both Touring and Sport configurations.
The heart of the C9 RS Turbo is a 3.0-liter, twin-plug turbocharged flat-six with Motec engine management that develops 420 hp and 380 ft lbs of torque; massive numbers for a 2,340-pound car. A tried-and-true G50 five-speed transmission and limited-slip differential make quick work of covering zero to 60 mph, all in under four seconds, while the car heads for a top speed greater than 170 mph.

Not counting the client-supplied donor car, the build starts at $510,000. 

Photo: Courtesy of Classic 9 Motorwerks.

The original Carrera RS, and certainly the track-focused RSR, were anything but luxurious when introduced. Conversely, the C9 RS Turbo is simple but sophisticated. Classic 9 Motorwerks takes a page out of the bespoke handbook to offer interiors finished in hand-tooled leather and aluminum that complement the C9’s build quality and starting price of $510,000, which doesn’t include the client’s donor 911.

A rendering of Classic 9 Motorwerks’ planned C9 GT6. 

Photo: Courtesy of Classic 9 Motorwerks.

Classic 9 Motorwerks is headquartered in a brand-new 8,000 square-foot facility in Jacksonville, Fla. Featuring a showroom and an expansive assembly facility, the new base of operations offers ample workshop space for the design and development of a forthcoming lineup. The latter includes the C9 GT6, a heritage-inspired evolution of the 914/6 GT from 1970 (in touring configuration), as well as the C9 CS, an interpretation of the lightweight and elemental 911 ST, of which a mere 24 examples were built for racing in 1970 and ’71.

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