Rami Al Ali

The 10 Best Looks from Rami Al Ali’s Dreamy Spring/Summer 2022 Haute Couture Collection

The 10 Best Looks from Rami Al Ali’s Dreamy Spring/Summer 2022 Haute Couture Collection

Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Trust Rami Al Ali to masterfully offer a vision of changing seasons through couture as an “homage to the dawn of spring.” Unveiled alongside Paris couture week, the Syrian designer’s Spring/Summer 2022 collection is a pastel dream of 22 looks that journey through seasons. “This collection’s theme is an optimistic one,” Al Ali shared with Vogue Arabia. “It is a positive force symbolized by the snow melting and spring blooming as the skies clear up from the heavy clouds that overwhelmed it over the past few seasons. I wanted the energy of my collection to be light, cheerful, and happy.” To that end, the color palette is thoughtfully curated to include mint green, citron yellow, and pale rose that represent warmth transitioning from the cooler and moodier icy blue and black.
Nearly a year after celebrating the 20th anniversary of his fashion house, the celebrity-loved designer showcases his honed aesthetic by offering both, delicately feminine and sharp structured pieces. Slinky dresses with sweeping cape sleeves contrast against show-stopping voluminous layered skirts, while his signature sculptured elements flow seamlessly into fluid draping in the same dress. The selection of fabrics and the craftsmanship rendered to them adds to the designer’s vision of shifting seasons to a great extent. Delicate and light muslin, tulle, satin, silk, and organza offer an air of dreaminess to the collection, crystals are used for a frost-like effect, and so is intricate beading in geometric patterns to appear as if they are melting off the gowns.
Take a look at the best pieces from Rami Al Ali’s Spring/Summer 2022 couture collection below.
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Read Next: The 10 Best Looks from Elie Saab’s Mediterranean-Inspired Spring/Summer 2022 Haute Couture Collection

8 Unforgettable Pictures of Rym Saidi in Her Glimmering Rami Al Ali Couture Gown at the Ball of Arabia

8 Unforgettable Pictures of Rym Saidi in Her Glimmering Rami Al Ali Couture Gown at the Ball of Arabia

Rym Saidi in Rami Al Ali. Photo: Dazl Production
Among the host of dazzling gold gowns at Vogue‘s Ball of Arabia, Rym Saidi‘s subtle yet elegant take on the night’s dress code was a noteworthy stand-out moment. The Tunisian actor took the pale gold route on December 12, and breezed into Raffles The Palm Dubai in a gown by Syrian couturier Rami Al Ali, cementing her spot among the best dressed at the grand event.

The strapless dress with a structured corset top flowed into a floor-grazing pleated skirt with a high slit, and was picked from the UAE-based designer’s Fall/Winter 2021 collection. Saidi, who also fronted Vogue Arabia’s May 2019 issue, channeled the model in her as she posed for the cameras at the ball, with lights reflecting off of the sharp pleats of her dress. The star’s look was curated by celebrity stylist Cedric Haddad and served as the perfect mix of regional and international talent, complete with Jimmy Choo heels, a gemstone-adorned Bulgari choker, and matching earrings (notice how one featured a ruby while the other championed a sapphire) that complemented her regal updo.

For the mother-of-two married to actor Wissam Breidy, picking a Rami Al Ali creation for the Ball of Arabia celebrating the UAE was an easy choice. Both, the designer and star, have adopted Dubai as their home, and there could not have been a better way to honor their connection to the country than by coming together to create this memorable sartorial moment. Speaking to Vogue Arabia, the actor shared why the gold number will also be one to remember for her. “I don’t usually wear gold, but it is the most luxurious color,” she said. “It is almost the end of the year, so it is a great occasion to wear the color, especially at this beautiful ball.” Saidi also took the opportunity to spotlight the strength of Emirati women, saying, “I am so proud of them—what they are doing and what they have done already. I am proud as an Arab woman living here in the UAE, and I want to see more and more Emirati women on top.”
Below, more snapshots of Saidi from the evening.

Read Next: Mona Zaki to Dorra Zarrouk: The Most Beautiful Gold Gowns from Vogue’s Ball of Arabia 2021

Syrian Couturier Rami Al Ali to Have an Exclusive Window Installation at Expo 2020 Dubai

Syrian Couturier Rami Al Ali to Have an Exclusive Window Installation at Expo 2020 Dubai

Rami Al Ali and Carmelo Zappulla. Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Traditional UAE crafts intertwined with 3D printing technology are what to expect when Syrian fashion designer Rami Al Ali joins hands with Barcelona-based architect Carmelo Zappulla. The two have come together for Expo 2020 Dubai’s Design and Crafts Programme Menasa, an Emirati Design Platform to tell a story through an exclusive window installation at the event.
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Mainly inspired by nature and Emirati heritage, the installation portrays the evolution of traditional crafts in a modern way. The Dubai-based designer worked with four main materials adapted locally by Emirati culture and the city’s contemporary design scene. This includes Talli, intricate patches of embroidery made of different colors and geometric patterns, Al Sadu, a traditional form of weaving, fishing nets made from cotton, palm fronds, which were used for weaving, and branches and flowers to reflect Al Ali’s couture line.
The window at Menasa. Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
All of these materials were hand-embroidered, experimented with different textures, colors, and malleability, After 375 hours of creation, and 1520 meters of materials, the designer was able to add depth and color to the contemporary model that Zappulla assembled. The designer is also offering hand-crafted limited edition commemorative boxes, made from white wood and maranti, in three designs in shades of gold, bronze, and beige. The boxes will be available to purchase at the Menasa Boutique located at the Rove Hotel.
Limited edition boxes. Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Zappulla relied on the technology of 3D printing, to create an installation that is not only visually pleasing but also tells the story of a future that is nature-centric. He is the executive director and founder of the international studio for External Reference, an award-winning studio that focuses on architecture, interior design, exhibition design, and urban design. This project is among several others he has worked on an international scale, including the exhibition design of the Spanish pavilion in the 2012 Yeosu Expo in South Korea.
The window installation and limited edition boxes will be on exhibit for the duration of Expo 2020, from October 2021 to March 2022.
Read Next: Syrian Couturier Rami Al Ali on Celebrating 20 Years of His Eponymous Fashion House

5 Things to Know About Rami Al Ali’s Unabashedly “Seductive” Fall 2021 Couture Collection

5 Things to Know About Rami Al Ali’s Unabashedly “Seductive” Fall 2021 Couture Collection

Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Syrian fashion designer Rami Al Ali’s fall/winter 2021 couture collection effortlessly marries simplicity with grandiose. Unveiled in a presentation on June 5, the 14 pieces romanticize architectural silhouettes through generously ornate embellishments. Read on for five things you must know about the collection.

The collection borrows from the simplicity of lockdown fashion
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Lockdown lifestyles have forced many designers to pivot away from their own aesthetics and toward the sort of simple, elegant clothing that feels right in the present. This collection does no different, with muted yet sophisticated tones that are easy on the eyes.
The collection takes creative cues from an award-winning photography series
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
The collection follows in the footsteps of a photo series by Swiss photographer Cyril Porchet. Named Seduction, they capture opulent altars in 10 baroque churches. The collection especially mirrors a picture of a church altar in Regensburg, Germany with incredibly detailed handwork. Baroque silhouettes reign supreme in the collection, with a touch of modernity in every piece.
The collection incorporates royal colors and shades
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
A sense of regality can be felt throughout the collection, conveyed through the Dubai-based designer’s use of champagne and beige hues, interspersed with varying degrees of gold, from bright metallics to vintage rust. As with every Al Ali couture collection, beading plays an integral role to its makeup.
The collection fuses Swarovski crystals and new materials
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Employing a dazzling blend of Swarovski crystals and pearls, the collection introduces feathers this season to create movement and provide contrast to the starkness of the gold, while maintaining the feminine codes of the house. New materials such as gilded macramé are also initiated to form a sleek, full crystal look.
The collection amalgamates diverse outfits
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Silhouettes vary from voluminous gowns to sleek fit-to-form varieties. Playful tea length dresses are interspersed with elegant jumpsuits, ruffled tops, and pleated muslin trousers.
Read Next: Maison Rabih Kayrouz Fall 2021 Couture Presents Les Exceptionnels

Syrian Couturier Rami Al Ali on Celebrating 20 Years of His Eponymous Fashion House

Syrian Couturier Rami Al Ali on Celebrating 20 Years of His Eponymous Fashion House

Celebrating 20 years of his eponymous fashion house, Syrian couturier Rami Al Ali retraces the steps it took to build – and why he’s now moving with purpose to pay it forward.
Rami Al Ali photographed by Sam Rawadi for Vogue Arabia April 2021
On a balmy, late winter’s evening in Dubai, Rami Al Ali, elegant as ever in slim, pleated pants and a white, cuff shirt, is overseeing the final touches of his Vogue Arabia shoot, celebrating 20 years since the launch of his fashion house. The table decor is imbued with ancient aesthetics from his country of birth and where he was raised – Syria. “It’s not just the craftsmanship,” remarks Al Ali, eyeing the mother-of-pearl elements native to Damascus, added by his Syrian friend, decorator Louay Mardam Bek. “It’s the elegance, the lines, those organic, naive branches with beautiful prints.” He very well could be speaking about his own contemporary couture that swaths the glamorous guests seated at his table in liquid satin, silk muslin, and tulle.
“When I hear the name Rami Al Ali, words bang into my mind and yet those words never fulfill his worth,” starts Egyptian actor Yousra. “Rami is one outstanding, marvelous, spectacular designer; always updated and ahead towards the international direction and genre. His spirit is reflected in his work; a signature that has a different taste and print in the world of fashion.” Al Ali started dressing Yousra for the red carpet in 2002 and the image of her in a white column gown with cap sleeves and floral yoke is one of his fondest memories. It would kickstart an eclectic list of celebrity dressing that – over the course of two decades – would include Aishwarya Rai, Beyoncé, Chanel Iman, Helen Mirren, Jennifer Lopez, Jessica Chastain, Mary J Blige, Shu Qi, and more.
“When I hear the name Rami Al Ali, words bang into my mind and yet those words never fulfill his worth.” – Yousra.
In the beginning, he didn’t have such clarity on what would eventually become an almost instantly recognizable aesthetic, one that is both sensual and demure. A combination of showcasing femininity, something in particular about the body, and celebrating the female curve. It bears a marked richness but in a modern, subtle way and with a detail that lends to its uniqueness. Over the years, it’s his meetings with clients, where he would learn about women’s lifestyles, their traditions, and their tastes, that would guide his hand. “They loved what they were seeing in the market, but it didn’t entirely match their tastes – that twist that comes from the region was not there. I wanted to fill that gap,” he recalls. “I wanted to be 100% Middle Eastern but I also wanted the client from the West or from Asia to be interested and to like it.”
Photographed by Sam Rawadi for Vogue Arabia April 2021
The son of a historian mother and architect father, Al Ali hails from eastern Syria. He remembers his childhood as idyllic. “It was the good old days,” he smiles. “Everything was available, natural, and there was not much competition.” Along with his parents and four sisters, he would holiday in the various corners of the country, enjoying simple luxuries like nature and each other. “As a child, Rami was rebellious. He rejected the norms imposed on him and any sort of control that limited his wild imagination,” recalls his older sister Reem. “He opted instead to think for himself, researching the context of things and the reasoning behind them. It was an early indicator of a strong personality, and a direct marker of someone destined to be an independent thinker and an exceptional creative.”
Little by little, the seeds for a life in fashion were planted. “I got the taste for fashion from my mother and the capacity to translate ideas onto paper from my father,” recalls Al Ali. Meanwhile, his sisters served as windows to a woman’s world. “I was very open and hungry for knowledge. I loved seeing and trying new things, and connecting with people around me. I started noticing how interested and infatuated I was with appearance; with what a dress can do to us and to others.”
Photographed by Sam Rawadi for Vogue Arabia April 2021
As a child, he watched his mother go about her house chores during the day before that moment of transformation that would come at night, when she would don a dress for a social engagement. “Her posture changed, her voice, her behavior, too, and so did the people around her,” he remembers. “Every time that happened I noticed how intrigued I was.” The young Rami started drawing, his sketches always focused on clothes. His mother took the work to a tailor and the result gave him confidence that fashion was something he wanted to try.
After moving to Damascus to study visual communications – there was no fashion school – he decided to travel to the US to further his education. A stopover in Dubai would prove life-changing. While in the UAE, filling out paperwork related to schools in the US, he was encouraged to do an internship. A stint at the fashion house Ghanati saw him conceive fresh ideas that could be viewed as the opposite of what was the norm at the time. “It was very much the old couture ways; heavy, costumey,” he remembers of the local styles. He indefinitely postponed his move to the US and opened his eponymous couture house in 2001, with a staff of five, in Deira Creek, which, at the time, was the place where international brands like Roberto Cavalli and Dolce & Gabbana were flourishing. It was also the beginning of a peak period in Dubai. “It was a perfect timing,” nods Al Ali of his founding days. “The market was rich, there were a lot of events, and there was a lot of support from the media.” One early supporter, journalist Diala Makki, recalls, “The first time I met Rami, I felt we were bonded by the soul and that we shared a similar vision.” She chose Al Ali to dress her in her role as host of Najm Al Khaleej, the Gulf version of American Idol, ultimately offering him a televised window to showcase his work to thousands across the region over the course of two years.
Photographed by Sam Rawadi for Vogue Arabia April 2021
Following the Dubai boom of 2005-2006, Al Ali moved his atelier and showroom to a private villa in Jumeirah. His sights were set beyond the emirate, however. In 2009, he took the decision to start showing in Rome, and would do so for three years. Though he didn’t know it yet, the city would serve as a stepping stone to Paris, the international capital of couture, where he would show for 16 consecutive seasons before the pandemic grounded all international travel to a screeching halt. “Paris, for me, was not part of my vision when I first wanted to go global. It was too far, too big, too scary, and too competitive. What was I going to do there? But Rome gave me confidence; it gave me that push that maybe I was thinking about Paris in the wrong way,” he remembers. Transitioning to the City of Light proved to be fortuitous. It also paved the way for many other up-and-coming brands, from both the couture and ready-to-wear worlds, otherwise too shy to show at the world’s fashion capital. Couture fashion expert Timothy Pope remarks of Al Ali that he is “one of the rare couturiers working today in the realm of high fashion who embraces and is capable of delivering both a classic, feminine aesthetic, while maintaining innovation and modernity.”
Photographed by Sam Rawadi for Vogue Arabia April 2021
Though less recognized, ready-to-wear is also a line that the couturier develops. HRH Princess Reema bint Bandar Al Saud was the first to champion it. “Before she was the Saudi ambassador to the US, Princess Reema was overseeing the operations for Harvey Nichols Riyadh. She told me that it had potential and I should do more of it. Harvey Nichols Riyadh was the first store to support it. It’s a new world that I am still discovering,” he comments. “It has a mindset and behavior that differs from couture; I am developing it every year.” He has also launched White, a line for brides looking for ready-made dresses. Now, back home in Dubai, the Covid-imposed break has incited Al Ali to gather elements of his past to push forward with a new purpose.
Having driven at full steam for two decades, he is taking stock of his success and opening his doors to his wider community. “When my sisters moved from Damascus to Dubai, I started building my own Syria around me. I also had guilt that I wasn’t doing anything – I wasn’t living it nor was I being affected by it like so many people there,” he considers. Al Ali’s thematic ard dyar courtyard dinners aim to bolster the talents of his Syrian contemporaries whose successes are all too often merely whispered. “We Syrians have such a quiet character that we don’t know how to speak to the masses,” he starts. He likens the Syrian personality to Damascene architecture. “Damascus is an old city surrounded with a boundary wall with seven doors that are closed at night. Any foreign face is deemed a threat. We don’t realize that when we don’t speak of our triumphs, we kill hope and possibility for youth who don’t see Syrian success stories.”
Photographed by Sam Rawadi for Vogue Arabia April 2021
Last year, he noticed a need for a greater sense of purpose. “I don’t want mine to be just a business, but one with a reason behind it.” He reflects on the lasting effect women have had on his life. “They are chameleons. Their ability to adapt so quickly has always amazed me. I take for granted the emotions behind it. How much ego a woman has to set aside in order to do everything she does in her life. I wish I could do that… I try.” And yet, his focus today has nothing to do with elevating his own name. Truly, he is Syrian through and through. “My purpose is to get someone else out there,” he remarks. “Purpose, in itself, is my goal for the years to come.”Read Next: Rami Al Ali on Evoking the Serenity of Damascene Evenings Through Couture
Originally published in the April 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia

Rami Al Ali on Evoking the Serenity of Damascene Evenings Through Couture

Rami Al Ali on Evoking the Serenity of Damascene Evenings Through Couture

For his spring/summer 2021 couture collection, Syrian designer Rami Al Ali looked to his own memories from Damascus. The Syrian capital is where the designer studied visual arts, honing his skills there before making his way to Dubai. Now, the collection marks a homecoming for the couturier who chose to forego presenting a fall/winter 2021 show in pursuit of a more sustainable future.
While the designer is based in Dubai, his Syrian heritage is ever-present in his eponymous label, and is a major part of his “identity and self-expression,” as Al Ali puts it. “It’s deeply embedded in the brand’s DNA and is often my main source of inspiration,” the designer shares with Vogue Arabia. “Sometimes it’s more obvious, while other times it’s more subtle and indirect through craftsmanship and graphics.” With this collection, the couturier aims to evoke his deeply personal, and vivid memories of Damascene evenings. “To me, it consists of a cool breeze wafting with a sweet Jasmine aroma,” the designer said in a statement. “Calming whispers behind the rosewood mashrabias, muddled with the gurgle of the courtyard fountain and the shadows created by the full moon, like a serene sanctuary – so soulful and peaceful.”

Translating this to the color palette of the 18-look collection, the pieces come in shades of warm beige and blush hues with the occasional moody black. “I wanted the collection to appear dreamlike,” says the designer. “Almost like a foggy vision as if you are looking at a scene from a dream. Therefore, these light, pale pastel shades helped to achieve that.” Silhouettes range from voluminous ball gowns to sweeping, sleek dresses, with bold jumpsuits and thigh-grazing dresses in between. While created using classic fabrics like satin and silk, almost every piece in the collection is elevated with strong opaque fabrics in dramatic architectural cuts and shapes like overscale ruffles, statement hoods, and abstract bows.

The year 2020 was a tumultuous one for the fashion industry, particularly in Lebanon. The country is home to many established designers who are still reeling from the effects of the pandemic and the tragic explosion, and thus, a few have chosen to delay their couture presentations. Like designers around the world, Al Ali was not immune to the effects of Covid-19 on the industry, having skipped his fall/winter 2021 show in July. However, the designer remains grateful for being able to push through. “To my luck, being based in the UAE — a country that has handled the pandemic in such a thoughtfully and proactive way — has really helped controlled the outbreak and allowed us to move forward with the collection,” shares the designer. “Also, the decision to skip the July collection saved us a lot in our resources,” he adds. “The feeling is also bittersweet, not to forget many of my dear colleagues from Lebanon who went through severe and difficult circumstances recently that led to the delay in production.”
“I wish all of them the best as they rebuild,” he continues. “I do really miss seeing their creations; competition is healthy and an important element for our professional development.” Being one of the few Arab designers to present a couture collection this season, Al Ali’s role as a creative in the current world is that much more weighty, and the designer hopes his collection can offer the much-needed escapism. “One of the highest purposes of all artists is to create, and through adversity, we appreciate that more than ever before,” he remarks. “Like nurses and doctors heal the body, artists are able to heal the mind by creating something beautiful.”
Read Next: Rami Al Ali Convenes Local Creatives to Spread Hope Through Couture

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