raf simons

5 Things to Know About Prada’s SS22 Shows in Milan and Shanghai

5 Things to Know About Prada’s SS22 Shows in Milan and Shanghai

Photo: Courtesy of Prada
Taking the “less is more” route, Prada’s SS22 collection explored the idea of seduction but in a rather subtle manner. Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons unveiled the collection titled Seduction, Stripped Down across two concurrent shows in Milan and Shanghai.
Here are five things to know about the Prada SS22 collection.
Photo: Courtesy of Prada
1. It is a reimagination of historical ideas around seduction
The collection features historically prominent clothing associated with seduction reimagined in a way that is less restrictive and more fluid. This is showcased through the use of deconstructed elements such as corsets with boning and laces across jackets, gowns, and the placement of bra-like padding and wiring on knitwear.
Photo: Courtesy of Prada

2. It juxtaposed eveningwear with daytime looks
The collection reimagines conventional evening wear while using elements central to it, to create a realistic contrast with everyday clothing. Think satin miniskirts with trains paired with jackets, pastel pink backless satin dresses, and fiery red lace gowns with corset bone detailing.
Photo: Courtesy of Prada
3. It marked Raf Simon’s first physical runway show with Prada
Raf Simons took on the role of co-creative director of Prada, alongside Miuccia Prada in 2020. Following the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic, all of the subsequent collections have been unveiled digitally. With Covid-19 restrictions being eased worldwide, this is the duo’s first full-fledged in-person show.
Above, Milan; below, Shanghai
4. The set material from the shows will be upcycled
Following both Milan and Shanghai shows, the materials used on the set will be upcycled. They will be donated to both Meta and the Dandelion Child Development Center. Meta is a Milan-based circular economy project that creates sustainable solutions for waste disposal and the Dandelion Child Development Center is a Shanghai-based nonprofit that recycles materials to build libraries for children in need.
Photo: Courtesy of Prada
5. Technology bridged the gap between the two concurrent shows
The collection was presented in two shows in Milan’s Deposito of the Fondazione Prada, and Shanghai’s Bund 1 with technology bridging the physical gap between them. “Synchronous and simultaneous views epitomize the modern world: we observe, interact and communicate in a multitude of manners,” the fashion house details in a statement. The unique unveiling of the collection brought two different audiences together as well as global audiences via the internet.
Read Next: 5 Things To Know About Fendi’s Studio 54-Inspired SS22 Show

Forget the Mini Bag, Prada Presents its Most Ingenious ‘Handbag’ Yet

Forget the Mini Bag, Prada Presents its Most Ingenious ‘Handbag’ Yet

As 2021 shapes up to be the year that we return to the dancefloor, Mrs Prada and Raf Simons were on hand to deliver a chic memorandum on how to dress up for the club. If, like us, you’ve forgotten how to wear anything that’s not elasticated, Prada’s FW21 collection will offer a succinct sartorial guide. Note the sequin-coated slips (guaranteed to shimmer when you dance), the swaddling nylon and faux-fur coats (ideal to ward off the chill while you wait for the Uber) and the throbbing Richie Hawtin soundtrack.
The ingenious, finishing touch? A haute glove purse that will see you bypass the coat check and go entirely ‘hands-free’. From zinging geometric opera gloves (styled with faux-fur shawls, cinching polo-neck knit catsuits and plunging sweater dresses) to neat gauntlets — the practical pouches we’ve all been hooked on ever since the rebirth of the bum bag (circa 2017) have undergone an alluring overhaul. (Think: Hitchcock heroine does Berghain).
Granted, there’s just enough room for a lip balm plus a single house key and certainly no space for a smartphone. Which is perhaps the most powerful Prada-Simons addendum of all — the suggestion that when we return to the dancefloor this fall, we can leave the content-making at home and just enjoy the moment. Something Marc Jacobs referred to in the post-show round table as “the art of living”.
Read Next: 10 Things Every Fashion Enthusiast Should Know About Prada’s Iconic History
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons on Digital Shows, Inspiring Disciplines and Collaborations

Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons on Digital Shows, Inspiring Disciplines and Collaborations

MILAN — Brands have been approaching the digital medium to present their collections in different ways and while the general goal is to return to physical runway shows, Miuccia Prada believes the efforts made so far should not go lost.
“Without a public, you need to be even more concentrated on what you say and to recreate an atmosphere. It’s much more difficult without people, and more difficult to show and then edit, find something that makes sense — before, it was like a promenade,” said the designer in a video conversation with Prada’s co-creative director Raf Simons and an eclectic group of talents and friends of the brand: Marc Jacobs; Academy Award nominated filmmaker, director, writer and producer Lee Daniels; electronic musician and DJ Richie Hawtin, or Plastikman; architect Rem Koolhaas, and actress and artist Hunter Schafer. Each was connected remotely and the virtual event, shown after the Prada fall 2021 show on Thursday, was moderated by Derek Blasberg, YouTube’s head of fashion and beauty.

“We will go back to reality, but we have to make sure this will not go lost and it will be interesting do both,” mused Prada.
“We were so used to having live shows and interaction, and we talked a lot with Rem about how to transport the feeling so that it looks like a show but we are not just filming a show, and how the space should relate to the clothes physically and psychologically,” said Simons.

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The designers reprised for the women’s show the same set used for the men’s fall show in January, conceived by Koolhaas and AMO — interconnected rooms, each wallpapered with different materials, from slick marble to fluffy eco-fur in striking color combinations.
“A show has a degree of premeditation and strong degree of improvisation and you can always play with the idea of originality,” contended Koolhaas.
Daniels, who directed “The United States vs. Billie Holiday” and asked Prada to design a selection of costumes to be worn by Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Andra Day in the title role, noted that in a show without a public, “you never take your eyes from the clothes, you are laser-focused on them” because there are no distractions like people-watching or front-row celebrities.
Asked about the evolution of the process since their first codesigned show in September, Simons said it has been easier now. “It was very difficult in the beginning” in deciding the format and whether to simply film a runway show or not.
Koolhaas said the video allowed the inclusion of different perspectives such as “opening with clothes shown from the back and disappearing in the distance.”
Hawtin said “thinking of the music, so very close to the fashion and the details, feels more intimate, rather than live. It’s symbiotic, we work on music as we are filming, it’s like Rem’s architecture, a framework that is there to support.”
Music can help build and retain the energy in a video, offered Simons, and contributes to hugely helping the end result.
Asked about his decision to work with Prada on his Billie Holiday film, Daniels said “outside of the work that is spectacular, she is a strong woman like Billie was a strong woman. I was nervous about asking her. She is an artist and she takes this very seriously. But I knew she would be fully committed, I couldn’t think of anyone else that could bring Billie’s style to life the way Mrs. Prada could.”

Schafer said acting in “Euphoria” made her realize how much clothing and makeup “accentuate elements of a scene, contrast in a cool way or bring something out. It was a massive learning experience.”
Prada was interested in finding out the disciplines that are more relevant to the panelists, just as movies or literature, for example, are to her.
Hawtin cited sculpture and Koolhaas anthropology, which helps him “understand the people we work for, their aspirations, habits, culture and aesthetics, as if you come from a different planet and interpret what you see and what it means.” In particular, he said he has enjoyed collaborating with fashion because of its “incredible speed, you can assemble something sublime in 15 seconds. Mixing the meticulous part of anthropology and the intuitive flashes of fashion is very crucial.”
“The art of living,” responded Jacobs, while also citing movies, art and music. “You need to be present and experience life on all levels. What we do is just one more aesthetic component of a beautiful life, like beautiful interiors and all of this.”
Blasberg’s request to define “Pradaness” sparked a few chuckles from Prada herself.
“Pradaness is Mrs. Prada,” said Jacobs. “No, don’t laugh Mrs. Prada,” he teased. While understanding the “intrinsic collaboration” with Simons, Jacobs cited her “incredible taste and eye for so many different things, it’s culture, intelligence, a sense of style, love of fashion. I see it as in a film of Antonioni, Fellini, Visconti. This is a mind that takes in anything, and you cannot put your fingers on it, it’s every gesture, everything.”
Koolhaas, who has long collaborated with Prada and her husband Patrizio Bertelli, said he was “fascinated by the way that, when she dislikes something, it’s a very different form of disliking, it’s different than simply rejecting, it’s exploring every aspect of what you dislike and then you do something with that energy,” prompting Prada to laugh in the background and Simons to concur, saying, “It’s so true.”
“Fashion is a field that requires inspiration and life, as Marc said very well,” observed Prada. “We have to deal with architecture, music, with people performing and basically we have to somehow tell a story. Ultimately, it’s about life, we need all these other people’s intervention.”
Jacobs has not held a show yet this season and defined the conversation as “an interesting and educational creative outlet.” He admitted it was “difficult and weird to take time off, complaining in the past about the calendar and how it was like a hamster wheel and we could never take a break and now that we get a break we complain.” [Prada laughing]. “I miss the hamster wheel and the calendar and what I’ve been doing is paying close attention to the people I admire. This is why this is a very interesting and engaging conversation.”
Koolhaas then noted that the urgency of global warming and sustainability and collaborating with scientists, “with little sense of aesthetics and patience for formality,”  have accelerated a generally slow-paced architecture, causing a “really drastic necessity to change. We have to throw all our priorities overboard, there is a sudden sense of urgency. It’s refreshing and we all need collaborations.”
“I totally agree,” said Prada. “We talked about light matters in this meeting, but in this moment, there are so many relevant political points, challenging the responsibility of the industry to behave well, to contribute to change and really be involved in matters such as diversity, gender, ecosystem. We can’t solve everything but it’s so important to be proactive and responsible and I really believe it’s so important to push on those subjects and take a step [in the right direction].”
The conversation, called “Prada Intersections,” is the third of the series, pointing to Prada and Simons’ curiosity and desire to open up to other communities to create a larger creative moment, aiming to challenge themselves with input from fresh voices. In January, following the fall 2021 men’s show, the designers engaged in a conversation with select students from international universities and colleges, each connected remotely. In September, the conversation between Prada and Simons was triggered by questions posed by the audience in advance of the show and submitted on prada.com.

Your Virtual Front Row Pass to Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons’ First Fall Show Together

Your Virtual Front Row Pass to Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons’ First Fall Show Together

Prada ready-to-wear spring/summer 2021. Courtesy of Prada

Milan Fashion Week kicked off yesterday with Kim Jones presenting his first ready-to-wear collection for Fendi. Today, February 25, designers Raf Simons and Miuccia Prada will debut their fall/winter 2021 womenswear collection for Prada.
The show is set to take place at 5pm GST today from an unknown location housing a set designed by Rem Koolhaas of AMO. The architect was also enlisted to design faux-fur-covered geometric rooms for Prada’s fall/winter 2021 menswear show, so viewers can expect a similar abstract set concept today. Like other shows this season, Prada will also not have a live audience. However, viewers tune into a conversation between Prada and Simons as the duo dives into the third installment of Prada Intersections. The conversation will feature virtual appearances from close friends of the fashion house like designer Marc Jacobs, Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Lee Daniels, musician DJ Richie Hawtin, as well as Koolhaas, while YouTube head of fashion and beauty, Derek Blasberg, will moderate the event.
Tune in via the live stream below today, February 25, at 5pm GST, to watch the Prada fall/winter 2021 show in action.

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Who is Pieter Mulier, the New Creative Director of Alaïa?

Who is Pieter Mulier, the New Creative Director of Alaïa?

Pieter Mulier. Photo: Pierre Debusschere

The name Pieter Mulier will be familiar to true fashion obsessives. The Belgian designer has had a hand in some of the most influential collections of the past 20 years, having started his career as an intern at Raf Simons’s eponymous brand in the early aughts and risen to become Simons’s righthand at Jil Sander and Christian Dior. When Simons was appointed the chief creative officer of Calvin Klein in 2016, Mulier was installed as his number two, with the title of creative director of womenswear.
But for many outside the industry, Mulier’s name and work might be less known. Maybe that makes him a perfect fit for Alaïa, founded by the Tunisian designer Azzedine Alaïa in Paris in 1980. The maison has long done things its own way, shying away from the fashion calendar and only showing a collection when it was deemed ready by Alaïa himself. Fans of the 2014 documentary Dior and I, which chronicled the making Simons’s first Dior Haute Couture collection, will find in Mulier a similar attention to detail and care.
Here, a breakdown of everything you need to know about Alaïa’s new creative director.
Mulier Isn’t Formally Trained in Fashion Design
Born in Belgium, Mulier studied at the Institut Saint-Luc in Brussels, a university that has produced an astounding amount of comic book artists and illustrators. Mulier, instead, studied architecture. His mentor Raf Simons studied industrial design at Genk’s LUCA School of Arts.
Raf Simons and Pieter Mulier take a bow after the Calvin Klein fall 2017 runway show in New York. Photo: Getty Images

Mulier Is Really, Truly Simons’s Right Hand
Thanks to Instagram, we know that Mulier started interning at Raf Simons amid the making of the brand’s fall 2002 Virginia Creeper collection. Since then, Mulier has been a constant presence by Simons’s side. He became the brand’s head designer by 2003, overseeing its menswear collections until 2010. From 2006 to 2009, he consulted at Jil Sander, where Simons was creative director, joining Jil Sander full-time in 2010. When Simons left Jil Sander in 2012, Mulier went with him; they took up residence at Christian Dior less than a year later.
“It evolved from being colleagues to a friendship now. I always think it’s like a ping-pong game,” Mulier told Another magazine in 2015 of his relationship with Simons. “He taught me a lot about art—you know his references are a lot of art and architecture—and luckily this is also my background, so this helps, and I think it works in both ways.”
But Mulier Did Not Join Prada With Raf Simons
When the pair’s stint at Calvin Klein ended in 2018, they returned to Antwerp. But while Simons worked on his eponymous label, Mulier seemed to be recalibrating. When the former was named Miuccia Prada’s co-collaborator at Prada in February 2020, the latter was not part of the deal, to the surprise of industry insiders. Many assumed a plum job was on the horizon, though it was Mulier’s partner, Matthieu Blazy, who made headlines with his appointment as the womenswear creative director at Bottega Veneta. Maybe we didn’t have our ears close enough to the ground: After nearly two years at home in Antwerp, Mulier is assuming one of the most coveted jobs in Paris, stepping into the shoes of a true master.
Read Next: Supermodel Cindy Bruna Remembers Her Most Cherished Memories with Azzedine Alaïa
Originally published on Vogue.com

Maison Alaïa Picks Pieter Mulier as Creative Director

Maison Alaïa Picks Pieter Mulier as Creative Director

More than three years after the death of fashion legend Azzedine Alaïa, the house that bears his name has hired Pieter Mulier as creative director.
Best known for his work as Raf Simons’ right hand at Jil Sander, Dior and Calvin Klein, Mulier starts immediately and is to present his first Maison Alaïa collection for the spring-summer 2022 season.
The Belgian designer will be based in Paris, and picks up the mantle of a couturier almost universally praised for his exacting methods and dedication to hyper-feminine, figure-flattering silhouettes.
Disclosing the hire exclusively to WWD, Maison Alaïa chief executive officer Myriam Serrano said it was an emotional day.
“His appointment marks the opening of an important new chapter for our maison as we jointly seek to carry the foundational values and distinctive style of Alaïa into the future,” Serrano said.

“Pieter stands out with remarkable technical talent and devotion to the craft, a sharp eye for construction and a sense of timeless beauty that is deeply ingrained in the creative approach of our maison,” she continued, also lauding his “keen intellect, true generosity and unwavering humanity.”
The high-profile hire is the latest sign of creative renewal at Compagnie Financiere Richemont, parent of Alaïa and Chloé, which late last year named Gabriela Hearst its new creative director. Hearst is expected to show her first collection in early March during Paris Fashion Week. Last month during couture week in Paris, AZ Factory, a joint venture between Richemont and designer Alber Elbaz, unveiled its first designs and put them for sale online.

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In a statement, Mulier said it is “an absolute dream” to join Maison Alaïa.
“Always ahead of his time and open to all arts and cultures, Azzedine Alaïa’s powerful vision has served as an inspiration, as he always sought to give the necessary time to innovative and enduring creation,” he said. “It is with this tremendous sense of admiration and responsibility that I will seek to carry forward his legacy of celebrating femininity and placing women at the heart of creation.
“I look forward to meeting the valued Alaïa clients and friends as well as the Alaïa Foundation, and to jointly shaping the future of this legendary maison,” he added.
After studying design and architecture at the Institut Supérieur d’Architecture ‘Saint-Luc’ de Bruxelles, Mulier started his fashion career working at the Raf Simons men’s label in Antwerp, and expanded his design sphere into women’s wear and accessories alongside Simons when the latter took the creative helm of Jil Sander.
A discreet presence on the fashion scene who posts artworks, groovy buildings and photos of his adorable, digging-crazy dog John John on his Instagram feed, Mulier came to prominence during his Dior days, stealing many scenes in “Dior and I,” a 2014 documentary by Frédéric Tcheng that charted Simons’ emotionally charged first two months as artistic director of the French couture house.
When Simons moved to New York to become chief creative officer of Calvin Klein, Mulier was named creative director and was responsible for executing Simons’ creative and design vision for men’s and women’s ready-to-wear, and the bridge and better apparel lines and accessories. Simons brought out Mulier for his runway bows. Mulier also managed all men’s and women’s design teams within the Calvin Klein brand, under Simons’ leadership.

That impressive and varied resume, plus his background in architecture, won Mulier the plum post at Alaïa, where collections start with 3-D shapes rather than flat sketches.
It is understood that Mulier will be devoted exclusively to Maison Alaïa, and he should bring a gust of innovation and fashion newness to the house.
The selection of a new creative leader at Alaïa was a delicate operation, given the towering legacy of the late Tunisian couturier and the fierce loyalty of the staffers he left behind. He died in November 2017 at age 77.
An iconic couturier of the modern era, Alaïa was known for his refusal to bow to industry timetables and marketing pressures, preferring to work at his own pace. He gained international fame in the Eighties because of the success of his evening dresses, snug knits and sculpted leathers, and was nicknamed “The King of Cling” because his clothes fit like a second skin.
Since his passing, the house has reinterpreted designs from his vast archives, and made limited expansion moves, in tune with his rigorous, at-his-own-pace ethos.
Serrano, who quietly joined Alaïa in 2019 from Chloé, where she had been its director of communications and accessories, last year introduced a wardrobe of Alaïa’s most emblematic designs called The Editions in a gesture to devotees — and in a bid to recruit future ones. The initial 30 looks, spanning from 1981 to 2017, were shown alongside Alaïa’s spring 2021 collection and made their debut at retail last November.
A second batch was presented alongside the fall 2021 collection last month.
Since Alaïa was purchased by Richemont in 2007, the conglomerate invested in staffing, a three-story flagship in an 18th-century mansion in Paris that opened in 2013, and a location on New Bond Street in London that opened in 2018.
Serrano broached the topic of creative renewal in an interview with WWD last year, disclosing that the house has recruited new talents in accessories and knitwear. She also allowed that the house was mulling a second step that could involve recruiting an artistic director.
See also:

Fashion World Mourns Death of Azzedine Alaïa

Azzedine Alaïa ‘Maison’ Opens in Paris

Naomi Campbell’s Courtroom Attire

The Designer Shuffle

The Designer Shuffle

While the pandemic put many recruitments on ice, creative renewal was still very much part of the fashion picture in 2020.
Mere weeks before Europe plunged into lockdowns, Prada surprised the fashion world by revealing that Raf Simons would become co-creative director alongside Miuccia Prada — igniting a trend toward coed duos that would unfurl throughout the year.
The move put the Belgian designer — one of fashion’s most acclaimed modernists, and a hero on the streetwear scene — in a position to help shape one of Italy’s biggest brands, and one he had long admired, often sitting in its front row.
In a livestreamed conversation following a digital showing of their debut spring 2021 collection during Milan Fashion Week last September, Prada said it was a spontaneous decision to work together, brewing over time “and suddenly it happened.” Simons said they had “always been interested in each other’s work.”

Having closely observed Prada for 25 years, Simons chose to focus on the uniform. “The idea of a uniform is a representation of longevity. In all honesty, I have been looking at Miuccia, how she is dressed, her uniform. It is what she finds important,” he told WWD.
Two more high-profile designers came together in September when Fendi said Kim Jones would work beside Silvia Venturini Fendi as the Roman house’s artistic director of haute couture, ready-to-wear and fur collections for women. Jones, who remains at the creative helm of Dior Men, succeeded the late Karl Lagerfeld at Fendi, which put him in a rare league straddling two marquee luxury brands.

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Kim Jones and Silvia Venturini Fendi  Jones photo by Nikolai von Bismarck; Venturini Fendi by Simone Lezzi/WWD

Venturini Fendi, who had soldiered on as the main creative force and media figurehead following Lagerfeld’s death in February 2019, will continue to head the accessories and men’s collections at Fendi. Jones is to unveil his first collection for the brand on Jan. 27 during couture week in Paris, with Venturini Fendi and daughter Delfina Delettrez Fendi, jewelry creative director, also involved in the show.
This marks Jones’ first real foray into women’s wear, and adds to a list of men’s wear mavens that have made their mark on women’s fashions in the new millennium, headlined by Simons and Hedi Slimane.
Jones should bring considerable heat to Fendi, given his formidable design chops, flair for unexpected collaborations, and his wide circle of famous friends, which includes Kate Moss, Naomi Campbell, Donatella Versace and David Beckham.
Industry experts suggest that the onerous demands on today’s creative directors is perhaps better shouldered by two people, with a dialogue between male and female talents fostering more dynamic and nuanced designs in tune with today’s fashions, less gender-specific than ever, and shifting values and priorities.
To wit: In September, Faith Connexion appointed Alexandre Bertrand and Myriam Bensaid as its first creative leading duo. The two 32-year-olds are described as “best friends” and had worked on-and-off for the brand in recent years.
Then in October, Joseph named husband-and-wife team Anna Lundbäck Dyhr and Frederik Dyhr as co-creative directors. The former joined Joseph in November 2018 after holding senior design roles at Bottega Veneta, Lanvin, Uniqlo and Cos, while the latter was previously creative director for men’s wear at Tommy Hilfiger.

According to a tabulation by WWD, coed duos head up 7 percent of the brands listed on the official fashion calendars for New York, London, Milan and Paris. Of the 265 fashion houses listed, 51 percent are led by men, 38 percent by women, with the balance a mix of male duos, female duos and collectives or studios.
Matthew Williams  Courtesy of Givenchy

Singular talents prevailed in the other key hires of 2020.
American designer Matthew Williams, whose roller-coaster buckle is one of the hallmarks of his edgy 1017 Alyx 9SM brand, brought his flair for hardware and icy, industrial-tinged glamour to Givenchy, where he succeeded Clare Waight Keller. A ringleader of the burgeoning luxury streetwear scene, Williams was named the French house’s seventh couturier last June and declared that his tenure would be based on “modernity and exclusivity.”
His debut for the spring 2021 season ended up being a showroom affair due to the pandemic, but was still one of the most anticipated events of Paris Fashion Week. His graphic tailoring announced sleek, sharp and modern as the house’s new fashion territory, alongside extreme textile research on casual basics, including jeans coated in resin and paint and triple baked for a cool, crackled finish.
Speaking of jeans, Diesel selected Glenn Martens — prized for his experimental approach to denim at his Y/Project brand — as its new creative director.
Italian industrialist Renzo Rosso, whose OTB group controls Diesel, called the Belgian designer the “perfect fit” for the brand. “I love the way he can pick iconic pieces and reinterpret them, denim in particular, with modernity,” he enthused. “I am happy to hand it over to someone who will carry it forward with new energy and a fresh vision.”

Glenn Marten  Courtesy of Y/Project

Martens’ impact on Diesel is to be fully felt with the spring 2022 collections.
Chloé, which is transforming into a purpose-driven company focused on social and environmental sustainability, took a big step in that direction by recruiting Gabriela Hearst — already synonymous with honest luxury — as its new creative director, succeeding Natacha Ramsay-Levi, who brought an edgy élan to the brand over a four-year tenure.
Hearst is expected to unveil her first collection for the storied French brand in March for the fall 2021 season, and to continue as creative director of her namesake, New York-based fashion house.
Hearst started her label in fall 2015 after taking over the operations of her father’s sheep ranch in Uruguay, and built a luxury women’s rtw and accessories business on the principles of timelessness, quality and sustainability. 
Gabriella Hearst in Paris.  Kuba Dabrowski/WWD

Wilder creatures are synonymous with Roberto Cavalli, which recruited Fausto Puglisi to helm all design functions and put a new spin on its animal prints. Since the exit of Paul Surridge last year, an in-house design team had filled the gap.
“I am honored and proud to carry on the legacy of this extraordinary brand and, above all, to continue to support Roberto Cavalli’s image of glamour and refinement,” said Puglisi, who is to unveil his first collection for the brand in January.
Meanwhile, Louis Vuitton, both a repository and magnet for talent, was implicated in several of the year’s other noteworthy designer moves.
In September, Nicolas Di Felice became the latest member of Nicolas Ghesquière’s inner circle to be put in charge of his own designer brand when he was named artistic director of Courrèges, where he succeeded Yolanda Zobel. His first collection for Courrèges is due in March. (Julien Dossena, another designer who learned the ropes under Ghesquière, helms Paco Rabanne, another Space Age label.)
Vuitton’s formidable leather goods department was involved in a trio of appointments.
In July, Nicholas Knightly, Vuitton’s design director for leather goods since 2004, took up the design helm of Moynat, another 19th-century trunk-maker controlled by luxury titan Bernard Arnault.
Around the same time, acclaimed leather goods designer Johnny Coca joined Vuitton as women’s fashion leather goods director, a new post working as part of the team lead by Ghesquière. Coca had previously wrapped a successful five-year stint as Mulberry’s creative director, and is known for his work under Phoebe Philo at Celine, which became a major player in elite handbags and accessories.
Finally, in an internal promotion revealed exclusively to WWD in November, Vuitton said a seasoned talent in its leather goods department, Darren Spaziani, would expand his role at the luxury giant and take the creative helm of men’s leather goods, in addition to his current responsibilities.

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