Queen Elizabeth II

Luxury Brands Play Key Supporting Role During Platinum Jubilee Weekend

Luxury Brands Play Key Supporting Role During Platinum Jubilee Weekend

LONDON – British and international luxury brands, including Burberry, Charlotte Tilbury and Moët & Chandon, are playing a small, but significant, role in the Platinum Jubilee celebrations, which culminate Sunday afternoon with a street pageant – in four acts – in central London.Those brands are among the “Platinum Partners,” or top supporters, of the pageant, along with Jaguar, Land Rover, Lloyds Bank, and others. They join a host of other backers such as Sotheby’s, Fortnum & Mason, Boodles, and mass names such as Meta, McDonalds and Cadbury are also lending their support.
The pageant starts at 2:30 p.m. local time at Whitehall and will make its way through through Admiralty Arch and up The Mall. The finale will take place just outside Buckingham Palace around the Queen Victoria Memorial.

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Celebrities from a variety of industries will take part in the three-hour event, including Ed Sheeran, Heston Blumenthal, Jeremy Irons and Gok Wan. In the works for many months, the event has been likened to the opening and closing extravaganzas of The London 2012 Summer Olympics.

Preparations for the Queen’s Garden at the Tower of London. The design was inspired by Norman Hartnell’s coronation dress for Queen Elizabeth.
RICHARD LEA-HAIR

While the British government has earmarked 28 million pounds for many of the Jubilee events, Sunday’s pageant is the result of private fundraising efforts by the Platinum Jubilee Pageant Ltd. It is estimated to be costing 15 million pounds.
As part of its support for the Jubilee weekend, Burberry has also teamed with Historic Royal Palaces to support Superbloom, an immersive floral display that encircles the Tower of London.
The brand is contributing two original, immersive outdoor installations, including a large, floating Burberry-branded meadow that is moored directly across from the Tower of London, on the Thames.
Burberry has also funded an art wall by the digital artist Jon Emmony that’s on display at the entrance of Superbloom.
The brand has also teamed with primary school children to create artwork and messages for the queen, marking her many decades on the throne. It worked with children at Armley Park Primary School in Leeds, near to Burberry’s Yorkshire factories.

Diana Ross performing at the Platinum Jubilee concert at Buckingham Palace on Saturday, June 4.
AP

The children’s creations have been enlarged and displayed on more than 80 bus stops throughout central London, where the Platinum Jubilee Pageant is taking place.
Tilbury, meanwhile, is the official beauty partner of the Platinum Jubilee Pageant, and has also created themed collections and accessories to mark the occasion.
The makeup artist and entrepreneur said the queen’s reign “has seen the most incredible transformations in the way that we live our lives – and throughout it all our queen has embraced change, captured our hearts, and led our country with pride through seven immense decades. I want to celebrate (her) timeless beauty, grace and dedication.”
Another luxury name has provided creative inspiration, rather than financial support, during the Jubilee celebrations: the queen’s longtime couturier Norman Hartnell.
Hartnell’s design for the queen’s coronation dress is the centerpiece of Superbloom at the Tower of London.
The Queen’s Garden, which has been installed in the Tower’s Bowling Green, features a combination of meadow flowers, topiary and summer-flowering perennials, bulbs and ornamental grasses.

Developed by Grant Associates, the lead designers for the Superbloom project, the garden draws on the colors, shapes and motifs deployed by Hartnell in the 1953 gown.
The display also features 12 cast glass forms by the artist Max Jacquard, representing the national emblems in Hartnell’s design. In the center of these motifs sits a glass crown, which is meant to be a reminder of the Tower’s role as home of the Crown Jewels.

Crowds on The Mall celebrating the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee.
Image Courtesy of Buckingham Palace

According to Matthew Storey, collections curator at Historic Royal Palaces, the charity that manages state properties including Hampton Court Palace, the Tower of London and Kensington Palace, the garden’s design takes its inspiration from the “tiers of embroidery” on the coronation dress.
The glass is meant to lend “sparkle” to the display, and to echo the sequin and crystal shimmer of the original design.
Storey said the 27-year-old queen, who was crowned on June 2, 1953, was adamant that the symbols on her coronation dress be correct. Hartnell had originally suggested floral emblems from Great Britain, but Her Majesty was thinking bigger and had wanted to acknowledge the Commonwealth countries, too.
The result of their conversations was a white duchess satin gown with floral emblems representing the queen’s nine dominions, Britain and the Commonwealth regions, picked out in shiny threads, seed pearls, sequins and crystals.
Hartnell even included the decidedly unglamorous leek to represent Wales, and added an extra four-leaf shamrock on the left side of the skirt for good luck so that Elizabeth’s hand could rest on it during the historic ceremony.
While luxury brands have played a big role during the Jubilee, the film industry, and the Paddington Bear franchise in particular, took a star turn on Saturday night in a surprise skit starring the queen.
“Happy Jubilee, Ma’am, and thank you … for everything,” said the bear, tipping his red hat to the queen, whom he discovered also carries a marmalade sandwich with her in case of emergency.
The two were filmed having tea at Windsor Palace. At one point, the queen pulls a big sandwich out of her signature black handbag. “I keep mine in here for later,” she told the bear.

The skit, with Paddington voiced by Ben Whishaw, kicked off the Party at the Palace concert on Saturday night, which saw musical performances from Queen, Duran Duran, Alicia Keys, Stefflon Don and Rod Stewart live at Buckingham Palace.

Forget the Royal Range Rover. McLaren Made a One-Off Artura Supercar for the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee.

Forget the Royal Range Rover. McLaren Made a One-Off Artura Supercar for the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee.

Queen Elizabeth II has made her love of Range Rovers abundantly clear over the years, but that hasn’t stopped McLaren from designing a one-off to honor her reign.

The British marque has unveiled a new “Platinum Jubilee” Artura to celebrate the fact that Her Majesty is the first British monarch to reign for 70 years. On top of that, last Thursday marked exactly 18 years since the Queen opened the McLaren Technology Centre in Woking, Surrey.

The celebratory speed machine comes courtesy of the automaker’s in-house bespoke division, McLaren Special Operations (MSO), which routinely delivers highly customized rides to collectors. The team first developed a special tool and press to create a unique badge for the supercar that simply spells out “Elizabeth II.”

The special platinum paint on the hybrid will be available to all collectors. 

Patrick Gosling

From here, a special platinum paint was developed and meticulously color-matched to the badge. To ensure the silver hue was just right, McLaren’s advanced coatings partner AkzoNobel analyzed different lighting conditions to define the most suitable metallic pigment combination. MSO’s paint developers then refined the finish over a further eight days. The result is a particularly striking shade that will be available to all the Queen’s subjects.
“It has been an honor for MSO to create a new platinum paint in celebration of Her Majesty’s Platinum Jubilee this year,” Ansar Ali, managing director of McLaren Special Operations, said in a statement. “This special paint, which will be available for customers to select for years to come, will be a fitting tribute to mark this historic milestone.”

The Queen opened the McLaren Technology Centre in Surrey 18 years ago. 

Patrick Gosling

Quite rightly, McLaren didn’t mess with much else on the Artura. The brand’s first series-production high-performance hybrid, which joins the 720S in the Super Series category, sports a sleek, lightweight body and has a scant curb weight of just 3,303 pounds.
Under the hood lies a 3.0-liter turbocharged V-6 good for 577 hp and 431 ft lbs of torque, along with an electric motor that churns out an additional 94 horses and 161 ft lbs of twist. This gives the supercar the ability to soar from zero to 62 mph in just 3.0 seconds on its way to a top speed of 205 mph. The battery pack, meanwhile, enables a top speed of 81 mph and a range of 19 miles on electricity alone.
Last we heard, no Range Rover can do that.

A Rainbow of Royal Outfits: 40 of Queen Elizabeth II’s Boldest Ensembles

A Rainbow of Royal Outfits: 40 of Queen Elizabeth II’s Boldest Ensembles

Photo: Getty
It’s often said that the Queen wears bright colors so she stands out for people wishing to see her in a crowd. This year, the monarch didn’t just celebrate her 96th birthday, she will also be celebrating her Platinum Jubilee come June 2022. As we continue on through Queen Elizabeth II’s most important year to date, Vogue takes a look back at her color pop wardrobe, from scarlet to indigo, with every shade in between.

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The Most Dazzling Jewelry Moments From Each Decade Of The Queen’s Reign

The Most Dazzling Jewelry Moments From Each Decade Of The Queen’s Reign

Photo: Getty
This year, Queen Elizabeth II will be celebrating her Platinum Jubilee, the first British monarch in history to reach such a milestone. Seven decades have passed since the death of her father, King George VI, during which she has earned a reputation not only of devotion to the monarchy and her people, but also as one of the best dressed women of our time.
None of the Queen’s outfits would be complete without her jewelry, however – from historic gems passed down from queen to queen through the centuries to recently acquired jewels. In the daytime, she is almost never seen without a pearl necklace, glittering brooch, and pearl earrings. For formal evening events, a necklace or tiara will be pulled out from the vault.
Despite having access to an awe-inspiring number of jewels, the Queen views them casually as being part of her uniform. Her sister, Princess Margaret, once marveled that Her Majesty was the only woman she knew who could put on her own tiara while walking down the stairs to attend an event.

Here, Vogue highlights key jewelry moments from each decade of the Queen’s 70-year reign.
Posing after her historic Coronation ceremony in 1953
Photo: Getty
For the actual moment of crowning, the gold St Edward’s Crown was used, but was then switched for the Imperial State Crown for the rest of the day. The Imperial State Crown was designed by Rundell, Bridge & Rundell for Queen Victoria in 1839. It is set with several historic stones: St Edward’s sapphire, Queen Elizabeth I’s pearl earrings, The Black Prince’s ruby, the Stuart sapphire and The Cullinan II. It was remade by Garrard in 1937 to be lightened for King George VI, but still weighs 2.3 pounds.
The Queen has spoken about the weight of the crown when worn during the State Opening of Parliament. “You can’t look down to read the speech – you have to take the speech up. Because if you did, your neck would break, or it would fall off. So there are some disadvantages to crowns, but otherwise they’re quite important things.”
The necklace and earrings worn that day are appropriately known as The Coronation Necklace and Earrings. In the 1850s, Queen Victoria had to return a number of Hanoverian heirlooms to her cousin the King of Hanover, including her grandmother Queen Charlotte’s diamond necklace. As a replacement, Queen Victoria had this new necklace and earrings created by dismantling jewels from “swords and useless things” belonging to King George III.
Attending the Royal Variety Performance in 1967
Photo: Getty
The Lover’s Knot Tiara was made by Garrard in 1913 for Queen Mary using stones from a tiara she was given for her wedding. Queen Mary had a passion for jewels, especially those with family history, so she had Garrard copy the design from a tiara belonging to her grandmother Princess Augusta, which was inherited by her aunt. The Queen inherited the tiara from Queen Mary in 1953 and later famously gave it to Diana, Princess of Wales as a wedding present. It’s now worn by Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge.
The necklace worn by the Queen was a Golden Jubilee gift to Queen Victoria from a committee called The Women’s Jubilee Offering. Originally the committee hoped to raise £10,000 to create a statue of Prince Albert, but when more than £84,000 of donations poured in, the committee set aside £5,000 to purchase this necklace from Carrington & Co. Queen Victoria designated this piece as an heirloom of the Crown.
The earrings worn by the Queen are from Queen Alexandra’s Wedding Parure, given to Queen Alexandra by King Edward VII for their wedding in 1863. The diamond bracelet on the Queen’s wrist was a wedding present from Prince Philip. Philip had used diamonds from a tiara given to him by his mother, Princess Alice of Greece, to design a bracelet and engagement ring for his future wife. The Queen has worn the bracelet frequently throughout her reign but in recent years has loaned it to the Duchess of Cambridge.
On a royal visit to Finland in 1976
Photo: Getty
The Vladimir Tiara was made for Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna, wife of Grand Duke Vladimir in the 1870s. Designed as a row of interlocking diamond circles with pearl pendants, it is believed to have been made by Bolin, and often graced the head of the Grand Duchess during her famous parties. The Grand Duchess was forced to flee Russia during the Russian Revolution, leaving her jewels behind hidden in a secret compartment in her St Petersburg palace. Eventually, on behalf of the Grand Duchess, a British officer dressed as a worker snuck into the palace, retrieved the Grand Duchess’s famous collection of jewels, and returned them to her once out of the country.
After the Grand Duchess’s death in 1920, her children sold part of her collection, this tiara being purchased by Queen Mary. Once in London, the tiara was repaired, having been damaged during the escape from Russia, and Queen Mary had the pearl drops made interchangeable with the Cambridge Emeralds: a collection of emeralds inherited from her grandmother Princess Augusta (who won them in a lottery in Frankfurt shortly after her marriage in 1818).
The Queen inherited the tiara in 1953 and enjoys wearing the drops interchangeably. On occasion, she will go for an all-diamond look and wear the tiara without any drops. The necklace and earrings were made by Garrard for Queen Mary to wear at the 1911 Delhi Durbar using some of the Cambridge Emeralds.
The Dorset Bow Brooch is pinned to the Queen’s sash. It was a wedding present to Queen Mary in 1893 from the County of Dorset. Queen Mary later gave it to the Queen as a wedding present in 1947.
Greeting members of the public on a state visit to Portugal in 1986
Photo: Getty
Here, the Queen is wearing the oldest set of jewelry in her collection, the Kent Amethyst Parure. The parure belonged to Princess Victoria, Queen Victoria’s mother. Consisting of a necklace, earrings, three brooches, and a pair of side combs, the parure was made an heirloom of the Crown by Queen Victoria. The parure is vary rarely worn, but the Queen enjoys wearing the brooches. On one occasion in 1902, Queen Alexandra wore the necklace cascading down the skirt of her dress.
The tiara worn here is the Queen’s favorite, referred to affectionately as Granny’s Tiara. The Girls of Great Britain and Ireland presented this to Queen Mary in 1893 as a wedding present. The tiara is designed with diamond festoons and scrolls on a detachable diamond base. It was originally topped with pearls, but these were removed and used to create the Lover’s Knot Tiara. The Queen has worn this tiara most frequently, and it is probably her most recognizable piece, being featured on currency around the world.
Attending a state banquet in 1990
Photo: Getty
The necklace and earrings worn here are some of the Queen’s most cherished jewels. Her father King George VI purchased them from Carrington & Co in 1947 and gave them to her as a wedding present. In the 1960s, the Queen found she was without a sapphire tiara, and in 1963, she purchased this one at auction. Her diamond and sapphire bracelet was acquired the same year, completing the parure.
The brooch pinned to the Queen’s sash is the Albert Sapphire Brooch and was given to Queen Victoria by Prince Albert on the eve of their wedding in 1840. Queen Victoria recorded in her diary, “My precious Albert gave me a splendid and lovely brooch of an immense sapphire, set round with diamonds; it is quite beautiful.” Queen Victoria designated this piece as an heirloom of the Crown, and it has been worn by every Queen since.
Smiling in the middle of a trip to Malta in 2005
Photo: Getty
Prince Philip was stationed with the Royal Navy in Malta between 1949 and 1951, and on her visits there, the Queen was able to briefly experience life as any other newlywed wife. Prince Philip’s cousin Lady Pamela Hicks recalled, “The Queen really loved living in Malta because she was able to lead a normal life, wander through the towns and go shopping. It was the only place that she was able to live the life of a naval officer’s wife, just like all the other wives.”
Prince Albert designed the Oriental Circlet Tiara, which was made in 1853 for Queen Victoria, who designated it as an heirloom of the Crown. Originally, the tiara was set with opals but Queen Alexandra believed opals to be unlucky and had them replaced with rubies. The tiara was a favorite of the Queen Mother, so much so that the Queen allowed her to retain it after ascending the throne when it should have been passed on.
The Queen’s necklace is known as the Baring Ruby Necklace, as it was acquired from the Baring Collection in 1964. She paired this set of jewels with Queen Mary’s Ruby Earrings. The earrings, which consist of large rubies surrounded by nine diamonds, were a birthday present to Queen Mary from King George V in 1926.
Hosting a state visit in 2019, one of her last before the pandemic
Photo: Getty
The Burmese Ruby Tiara was created by Garrard for the Queen in 1973. The rubies used in the tiara were from a necklace presented to the Queen as a wedding present from the Burmese people. The necklace consisted of 96 rubies, which by Burmese custom would protect the wearer from the 96 diseases that can afflict a human. The diamonds used in the tiara were taken from another wedding gift, a tiara from the Nizam of Hyderabad. The new tiara is designed as a wreath of ruby roses, inspired by the Tudor rose, connected by diamond and ruby sprays.
The necklace and earrings worn by the Queen were made for Queen Victoria and originally set with opals instead of rubies. They were left as heirlooms of the Crown by Queen Victoria. Queen Alexandra had the opals replaced with rubies in 1902.
Her outfit is completed with the diamond-studded insignia of the Order of the Garter and the Family Orders of King George V and King George VI. Royal Family Orders are given to female family members by the monarch and feature their miniature portrait in a diamond frame on a silk ribbon.
Originally published in Vogue.co.uk

Best Fashion Instagrams of the Week: Kate Middleton, Tara Emad, and Karen Wazen

Best Fashion Instagrams of the Week: Kate Middleton, Tara Emad, and Karen Wazen

Photo: Instagram.com
This week, the British royal family was at the forefront of fashion talk, thanks to Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge‘s sartorial choices during the royal tour to the Caribbean. As always, the Duchess honored the locations she visited through her ensembles, stepping out in Jamaica dressed in a bold yellow dress by Roksanda, and enjoying some sunshine in Belize dressed in a tropical print dress which featured the colors of the Belize flag. Her biggest fashion moment during the tour, however, included a shimmering pink maxi dress from The Vampire’s Wife. Middleton stepped away from her usual ladylike midis for a hint of drama with this pick, which she styled with Jimmy Choo heels and an embroidered Mayan clutch.
Keeping the royal family in mind, another big moment came via the release of British Vogue‘s cover, which marked Queen Elizabeth’s cover debut, in celebration of the monarch’s platinum jubilee. The issue features a portrait of the royal shot by Antony Armstrong Jones which has become one of her most popular images across the globe.

Closer to home, Karen Wazen took over our feeds this week while attending a wedding, dressed in a lime green feather-trimmed kaftan-style dress that may just make it to your summer wish list. Tara Emad too made a case for breezy silhouettes, stepping out in a multicolored Chanel maxi skirt, and Gigi Hadid, joined by sister Bella Hadid, made a noteworthy appearance on the runway for Ralph Lauren’s Fall/Winter 2022 show. For more updates on the week that was, keep scrolling.

20 Pictures That Celebrate HRH Princess Margaret’s Incredible Style on the 20th Anniversary of Her Death

20 Pictures That Celebrate HRH Princess Margaret’s Incredible Style on the 20th Anniversary of Her Death

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HRH Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon’s pioneering style paved the way for Diana, Princess of Wales to don the candy-colored confections of tweed twin sets we know and love. The perfect recipe of elegance, grace and high octane glamour has allowed the younger generation of royals rules to follow in her footsteps of fashion. The ‘Margaret look’ has always been on-the-nose of modern design.
It was Margaret who bought couturier Christian Dior into the forefront of the press, thanks to the decadent dress she wore on her 21st birthday, carefully selected from a private show for the Queen Mother and sister, the then Princess Elizabeth. Captured by Cecil Beaton in his signature lavish elan, the frothy layered tulle cream ballgown has since become an emblem of Dior, couture and sovereign style worldwide with countless references still rife on the runways decades later.
Her petite frame lent perfectly to the mod riffs of the swinging Sixties as mini skirts and A-line dresses became all the rage. In the Seventies, her penchant for swirling prints became a masterclass in how to wear patterns, and the frou-frou fabulousness of puffed shoulders and scintillating satins during the Eighties had never looked so good as when the princess presented them. This keen attention to current trends led many to laud her as the most fashion-intellectual royal of all time.
While being the younger sister may have meant she missed out on becoming Queen, Margaret certainly ruled the social scene. Always impeccably dressed alongside the likes of Sophia Loren, The Beatles and society’s most stunning starlets, Margaret’s discerning and trend-focused tastes always celebrated the finest fashions of the moment. Even into her later years, suffering from multiple health issues, the Princess donned informed and inspiring style choices.
An angel of Ascot, a red carpet maven, and a style icon in the highest regard; long live the fashion reign of Princess Margaret.
Portrait by Cecil Beaton, 1944. Photo: Getty
At Buckingham Palace on her 17th Birthday, 1947. Photo: Getty
Portrait by Cecil Beaton, 1949. Photo: Getty
Portrait by Cecil Beaton, 1951. Photo: Getty
At a garden party during her African tour, 1956. Photo: Getty
Inspecting a guard of honour at an Agricultural Show in Moshi, Tanganyika, 1956. Photo: Getty
At the Equestian Olympics in Stockholm, 1956. Photo: Getty
At The Alamo premiere, 1960. Photo: Getty
At a wedding at Westminster Abbey, 1962. Photo: Getty
Waving to crowds during a dance display at Williamsfield in Jamaica, 1962. Photo: Getty
With the Earl of Snowdon in the Bahamas, 1967. Photo: Getty
With Princess Anne and Queen Elizabeth II at the investiture of Prince Charles, 1969
At Royal Ascot, 1969. Photo: Getty
At a royal function, circa 1970. Photo: Getty
With the Earl of Snowdon, 1970. Photo: Getty
At Royal Ascot, 1979. Photo: Getty
At the Royal Opera House, 1986. Photo: Getty
With Queen Elizabeth II, 1988. Photo: Getty
With the Queen Mother at Trooping the Colour, 1993. Photo: Getty
At a performance of Three Tall Women, 1994. Photo: Getty
Originally published in Tatler.com

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