Porsche

This Lykan Hypersport Was Frankensteined From Fiberglass and Porsche Parts. Now It’s up for Auction.

This Lykan Hypersport Was Frankensteined From Fiberglass and Porsche Parts. Now It’s up for Auction.

You know those used car listings that claim “no stories,” where a vehicle is of such faultless history and pure lineage that it requires no qualification? Well, this isn’t one of those cars.

This particular story goes like this: When VINwiki founder Ed Bolian was hunting down a blown-up Lamborghini Murcielago V-12 powerplant to create a “steampunk chandelier” for his garage, he found a seller who was willing to throw in the body shell of a Lykan Hypersport. 

The aggressively named Lebanese supercar is manufactured by UAE-based W Motors, and rose to prominence after being featured in Fast and Furious 7. Only 7 of the original cars exist in total; this particular shell was not used in the film, but was intended for use in a Fast and Furious live show.

Since the real deal Hypersport was based on a Boxster chassis and modified by Ruf, Bolian and his cohort Casey Putsch of Genius Garage hunted down a 2007 Porsche Boxster S as a donor car so they could mate the bodywork to a functioning chassis. The build process was documented in this YouTube playlist, and as Putsch puts it, “This will never be a Porsche Boxster again.”

The Lykan Hypersport Supercar reportedly drives perfectly. 

Genius Garage

The story takes a human interest twist when we get to the workforce used to painstakingly Frankenstein the fiberglass body onto the Porsche platform (which no doubt required stretching, shimmying, and squeezing in order to connect the disparate mechanical dots): Putsch’s Genius Garage utilized engineering students, whose practical experience on the project gave them an unusual perspective on what makes a functioning automobile tick. W Motors guided the team on how to make all those mismatched parts fit together, and its CEO provided a letter and a commemorative roof plaque.
While Putsch says the car “drives perfectly,” he also discloses a few caveats like a check engine light, a tire pressure warning light, and an off-road-use only stipulation. The car is currently for sale on Bring a Trailer, with proceeds going to Genius Garage, which is a 501 C3 nonprofit with a self-described mission of “bridging the gap between academia and industry to help kickstart the careers of college engineering students.” 

The ersatz Hypersport has already reached a six-figure price on Bring a Trailer—not quite the original Lykan’s $3.6 million value, but still significant considering its convoluted provenance. Putsch says, “Histories and stories are what set great cars apart from historic cars. This car definitely has an awesome story.”

Click here to see all the photos of the Lykan Hypersport Supercar.

Genius Garage

Porsche and Pixar Teamed Up to Create a Real-Life Version of Sally Carrera From ‘Cars’

Porsche and Pixar Teamed Up to Create a Real-Life Version of Sally Carrera From ‘Cars’

Only a few months after Porsche and Pixar promised a modern, real-life Sally Carrera at the South by Southwest festival in Austin, Tex., the car is ready to hit the auction block next week through RM Sotheby’s at the Portola Hotel in Monterey, Calif., as part of this year’s Monterey Car Week. Unlike the original Sally model used to promote the Pixar film Cars, this example is the result of Porsche’s Exclusive Manufaktur division working with Pixar’s Jay Ward and Bob Pauley to bring Sally to life in the form of a current-generation 911 Carrera GTS that exudes the spirit of Sally without looking cartoonish.

“This time we weren’t going to make a car with eyes,” Pauley told Robb Report during an interview ahead of the vehicle’s public announcement. “This isn’t a character, this is a street-legal car inspired by Sally in the details.”

The first Sally Carrera (left) was made for promoting the “Cars” movie, while this new version is a street-legal interpretation of its namesake character. 

Porsche Cars North America

Those details include a special paint dubbed Sally Blue Metallic, which had to be mixed and applied by hand. Many of the exterior elements that are done in black on the standard 911 are painted body-color on Sally, including the rear diffuser and slats on the rear engine cover.
“The 992 has many more black surfaces, and by painting many of these it gives the car a bespoke element,” says Grant Larson, Porsche designer and director of Special Projects for the marque. “It’s breathtaking because it really feels like Sally,” Pauley adds. And when the rear wing is up, you can even see Sally’s “tattoo,” the same found on the namesake character in the film.

The Sally Special is Inspired by the animated character Sally Carrera from “Cars” and built from a Porsche 911 Carrera GTS. 

Porsche Cars North America

In addition to the special paint, Larson worked with Pauley and Ward to create a new, exclusive wheel design that is a modern take on the 996 Turbo wheel. “We interpreted some of Bob’s sketches of the wheel, and it was a perfect reinterpretation of the 996 but more fitting to the form language of the 992,” says Larson.
The Sally Special is powered by a flat-six engine that makes 473 hp and is fitted with a seven-speed manual transmission. Options include rear-axle steering, a front-axle lift system (to clear steep driveways and speed bumps), and an extended-range fuel tank.

When the rear wing is up, you can see Sally’s “tattoo,” found on the original car in the film. 

Porsche Cars North America

The interior is also fully customized, with Pepita upholstery done in Speed Blue, Chalk and black. “When she left the standard production line, everything from the interior was pulled apart and refined,” Larson says. “Nothing was left untouched.” This includes a sketch of the original Sally on the dashboard with the designation that the vehicle is one of one. Larson also mentions that the car has more than 35 options from Porsche’s Sonderwunsch customization program.

The seats are fully customized with Pepita-patterned upholstery done in Speed Blue, Chalk and black. 

Porsche Cars North America

While Porsche isn’t giving an estimate for the Sally Special’s value, a current 911 Carrera GTS with a custom, paint-to-sample exterior color and Exclusive Manufactur leather interior, as well as many of Sally’s options, balance out to well over $200,000. According to some customers, the Sonderwunsch features can add as much as $100,000 to that cost. Then again, Sally isn’t something you could ever configure yourself.
“There’s really no way to put a price tag on this,” Ward says. And it isn’t only the options that make Sally special. Larson notes that many Porsche employees and suppliers donated their time and materials along the way. “We hope whoever wins it will want to drive it,” says Ward. “We specced it selfishly for ourselves.”

Unique touches include a sketch of the original Sally on the dashboard with the designation that the vehicle is one of one. 

Porsche Cars North America

Sally will go under the hammer as lot No. 332 on Saturday, August 20. Proceeds will go to both Girls Inc., an advocacy group for girls and young women, and the USA for UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency providing aid to children and their families affected by the conflict in Ukraine.
Click here to see photos of the Sally Special developed by Porsche and Pixar.

The Sally Special developed by Porsche and Pixar. 

Porsche Cars North America

The Porsche Taycan Turbo S Just Broke the Tesla Model S’s Nürburgring EV Record

The Porsche Taycan Turbo S Just Broke the Tesla Model S’s Nürburgring EV Record

The Nürburgring has a new electric king—and this time it’s German.

Porsche has just announced that the Taycan has regained its title as the fastest production EV to circle the infamous “Green Hell” after completing a lap in just 7:33.3. That time easily beats the previous mark, which was set by the Tesla Model S last year.
Lars Kern drove the Taycan Turbo S on its recent record-setting run around the race complex’s 12.9-mile north loop, according to the automaker. He was able to complete his trip around the winding circuit more than two seconds quicker than the high-performance Tesla Model S Plaid managed last September (its time was 7:30.9). This isn’t Kern’s first time setting a record at the famous track. He drove a Taycan Turbo around the north loop in a then-record 7:42 in the summer of 2019.

The record-setting 2023 Porsche Taycan Turbo S with the Tequipment performance kit 

Porsche

The Taycan Turbo S was equipped with Porsche’s just announced Tequipment performance kit for its latest record run. The company’s top-of-the-line electric sedan is already a beast, thanks to a drive unit that can pump out up to 750 hp, but the pack adds 21-inch wheels wrapped in street-legal Pirelli P Zero Corsa tires and Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control software. The Taycan Kern drove was also completely stock, with the exception of a roll cage and racing seats for safety purposes.
“We’re delighted that the Nürburgring record for electric cars is back in Porsche hands,” Kevin Giek, the vice president of the Taycan line, said in a statement. “This lap time not only shows how much potential lies in our new performance kit, but also confirms once again the sports car genes of the Taycan.”

Looking to set some records of your own? The Tequipment performance kit will soon be available to purchase for €13,377. It’s only available on the 2023 Taycan Turbo S and unfortunately only in Germany for the time being. Considering how popular the Taycan has already proven to be, we wouldn’t be surprise to see that soon change.

How a Shakespearean-Level Family Drama Is Complicating Porsche’s Upcoming IPO

How a Shakespearean-Level Family Drama Is Complicating Porsche’s Upcoming IPO

Regime changes are par for the course in automotive circles, with the revolving door of executives turning as naturally as shifting tides. But the recent departure of Herbert Diess from the top spot at Volkswagen revives a power play between VW and Porsche that stirs longstanding friction stemming from two larger-than-life dynasties: the Porsches—descendants from company co-founders Ferdinand Porsche and his son Ferry, and the Piëchs—offshoots of Louise Porsche, who acquired her husband’s Piëch surname and begat Ferdinand Piëch, whose infamous ambition led him to rule the Volkswagen empire and acquire luxury brands including Bentley, Bugatti and Lamborghini. 

The family feud thickened in 2009 when Porsche attempted to purchase Volkswagen in a market short squeeze, a move which backfired after the carmaker’s fortunes shifted suddenly. In a Shakespearean reversal of fortune, Volkswagen turned around and acquired a 49.9 percent stake in Porsche, buying up the remaining 50.1 percent in 2012. The occasion fueled then-chief executive Martin Winterkorn to declare, “Together we are more capable than ever of becoming the best auto company in the planet”—exactly the sort of imperious statement you’d expect from the apex of an enterprising corporation.

Herbert Diess 

Carsten Koall / Stringer

Fast forward to present day, and the dismissal of Diess is said to mark the efforts to keep VW on “a short leash” and meant “to keep a closer eye on the implementation of strategic guidelines,” according to one insider. While Diess made significant inroads to electrification, his confrontational leadership style drew criticism, not to mention some 18 months of declining stock prices. Also significant: the installation of Porsche head Oliver Blume as the next VW CEO, who will simultaneously remain the leader of Porsche.

Oliver Blume 

Porsche

With the “preferred candidate” in power, Blume is expected to reel back spending on EVs, a critical financial choice that will help push through a Porsche IPO. While some have estimated the Porsche valuation at up to €100 billion (about $102 billion), figures as low as €60 billion (about $61.3 billion) have also been tossed around, a discount which would not only net fewer gains for stakeholders, it would limit the brand’s ability to reach its goal of an 80 percent electrified lineup by 2030. As with all transfers of power, the ever-shifting dynamics between Volkswagen and Porsche will hinge on a delicate balance of fortune and fate.

First Drive: This Porsche 911 Restomod Seamlessly Blends Old-School Grunt With Modern Refinement

First Drive: This Porsche 911 Restomod Seamlessly Blends Old-School Grunt With Modern Refinement

Many Porsche restomods follow the same formula: start with a 964 or big-bumper G Series 911, then “backdate” it to look like an early 1970s 911S or 2.7 RS. Broadly speaking, that’s the approach the Paul Stephens restoration house has taken with its bespoke AutoArt cars since 2002. Now, however, the UK specialist has changed direction with a restomod that rejects nostalgia and sees the classic 911 through a contemporary lens. Meet the 993R.

Based on the final evolution of the air-cooled Porsche 911 (made from 1994 through 1998), the 993R goes back to the future with a range of upgrades from later, water-cooled GT models. Paul Stephens explains that the brief was to “take a Carrera and uplift everything by 25 percent.” Inspiration came from the “less is more” ethos of the cult-classic 911R, both the 1967 original and its 2016 sequel.

The 993R, a restomod Porsche 911 from Paul Stephens. 

Courtesy of Paul Stephens.

Despite having more power (330 hp) and less weight (2,690 pounds with fluids), the 993R is resolutely focused for the street. On narrow UK roads in particular, that means slim hips are best, so each build will start with a Carrera 2, rather than the Carrera 4 with its wider haunches. Incidentally, both cars still have a smaller footprint than today’s 718 Cayman.
Taken back to bare metal, the 911’s shell is seam-welded for strength and its rain gutters are removed to improve aerodynamics (a trick Porsche used on the 959 supercar, aiding towards its 197 mph top speed). The fiberglass front and rear bumpers are made in-house and weigh just 20 pounds each, while the elongated rear spoiler has ram-air vents like a 996 GT3. And Porsche Motorsport’s thinner glass helps save a few pounds, too.

Despite having racy specs like 330 hp while weighing only 2,690 pounds (with fluids), the 993R has been resolutely focused for the road. 

Courtesy of Paul Stephens.

The 993R’s adjustable suspension is also sourced from the racing department in Weissach, and combines with Tractive Ace adaptive dampers (also standard equipment for Ruf and Pagani). Stephens didn’t want a glaring touchscreen bolted to the 993R’s dashboard, so a simple twist-knob offers five preset levels of ride stiffness. In a rare case of newer wheels looking right on an older car, the 18-inch rims come from a 996 GT3 RS. Wrapped in Michelin Pilot Sport tires, they cover the stronger “Big Red” brakes of the 993 Carrera RS.
Lift the lid of a regular 993 and its 3.6-liter flat-six is barely visible beneath a muddle of ugly black plastic. The “R” revision from Stephens, by contrast, has an exquisite engine bay worthy of a show car. The view is now dominated by a polished 996 GT3 plenum, individual throttle bodies and a 993R-branded shroud for the fan, while the air-con system (now electric) has moved to the front trunk to improve weight distribution.

Wrapped in Michelin Pilot Sport tires, the 18-inch rims come from the 996 GT3 and cover brakes from the 993 Carrera RS. 

Courtesy of Paul Stephens.

Expanded to 3.8 liters, the engine also uses 993 RSR pistons, custom camshafts, Pauter lightweight conrods, solid Porsche Motorsport lifters and a 997 GT3 crankshaft and oil pump. Peak power arrives at 7,400 rpm, with the limiter likely to be fixed just beyond 8,000 rpm. “It’s an engine that was designed to rev,” explains Stephens. “Turbocharging or supercharging was never an option. You need to work for the power and feel it build.”
Inside, the 993R is simple but beautifully effective. Most of the panels have been reconstructed from fiberglass to ensure a flawless fit, then retrimmed in soft Italian leather. Formerly plastic parts such as the column stalks and heater controls (even the ignition key) are replaced by cool-to-the touch aluminum. There’s a USB for charging your phone, but no infotainment—though it’s an option, according to Stephens. So too is a “Touring” specification, with rear seats rather than the half roll cage filling the back.

The 3.8-liter flat-six features a polished 996 GT3 plenum, individual throttle bodies and a 993R-branded shroud for the fan. 

Courtesy of Paul Stephens.

The air-cooled engine sounds angry and insistent at idle, its single-mass flywheel rattling like a race car. It soon settles down on the move, though, with 2022-spec sound deadening to muffle the commotion. Only when you get beyond 5,000 rpm does the 993R begin to truly sing: a hard-edged, visceral howl that feels as physical as it is acoustic. Infotainment? Who needs it?
Paul Stephens will offer a 360 hp version of this engine, along with a 4.0-liter unit that could top 400 hp. For the road, however, in a car that weighs 331 pounds less than a stock 993 Carrera 2, you really don’t need more. The 993R is hugely tractable, without the low-speed stutter or shunt that afflicts some tuned flat-sixes, and its notchy six-speed manual gearbox is a joy to use. The throttle even has a special tab to help you heel-and-toe. And as for a zero-to-60 mph time, 4.5 seconds is what can be expected, plus a top speed north of 170 mph.

For the interior, most of the panels have been reconstructed from fiberglass then retrimmed in soft Italian leather. 

Courtesy of Paul Stephens.

The 993R is still unmistakably a 911 to drive. There are quirks, such as the floor-hinged pedals, the upright windshield and the steering wheel that obscures half the dials. But more fundamentally, there’s the sense of weight transfer, of throttle-adjustable balance and the wonderful tactility through the Momo wheel. English country lanes are a notoriously tough test, yet with the shocks on their second-softest setting, the car didn’t bump or thump once. “We wanted it to be daily drivable,” says Stephens. Mission accomplished.

The elongated rear spoiler has ram-air vents like a 996 GT3. 

Courtesy of Paul Stephens.

In truth, I can’t think of many cars I’d rather drive every day. The 993R delivers a brilliant blend of old-school thrills with just enough modern luxury and civility. If Porsche had built a 993 GT3, I suspect it would have looked something like this. A starting price of around $480,000 (plus a donor car) pushes the cost of a Paul Stephens restomod into the realm of serious supercars. And like the latter, with only a handful likely to be built each year, it will remain a rare and special sight.
Click here to see all the photos of the Paul Stephens 993R Restomod.

The Paul Stephens 993R restomod based on the Porsche 993. 

This 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera Was Paul Walker’s Dream Car. Now It’s Up for Grabs.

This 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera Was Paul Walker’s Dream Car. Now It’s Up for Grabs.

Back during the salad days of the Fast and Furious franchise, the classic Porsche market was already venerating the legendary 911 Carrera RS 2.7. 

Produced for only one year, the so-called ducktail 911 earned its rightful place in history through its pared down adherence to racing homologation rules and more powerful version of Porsche’s notorious flat-6 powerplant. The rigorously streamlined 911 drew the admiration of enthusiasts from the get-go, achieving its initial estimate of 500 sales so quickly that production was later tripled, with 1,580 units of the aggressively tuned two-seater eventually rolling off the line.

Among those smitten by the RS’s specialness was late actor, racer and all-around car enthusiast Paul Walker, who purchased a 1973 example on the internet in 2011. Walker enthused about the car on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, claiming that he bought the two-seater sight unseen, because it was from, “the golden era of Porsche, [and was built] the year I was born.” Walker’s collection would later encompass an eclectic, but thematically cohesive selection of cars that included numerous BMW E36 Lightweights, a Nissan R32 Skyline race car and a ’64 Chevrolet Chevelle Wagon. 

Paul Walker’s Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7 

Mecum Auctions

RS values have skyrocketed in the years since. Hagerty estimates that a “Concours” condition RS was worth around $335,000 when Walker bought his, but puts that number at closer to $900,000 today. Walker’s light yellow RS will likely punch through to an even higher stratosphere when it crosses the Mecum auction block in Monterey in a few weeks.
Before Walker’s untimely death in a car accident in 2013, he undoubtedly enjoyed RS chassis No. 9113600901 for its lightweight construction and decidedly analog-era mechanical honesty. In its day, it was the first car tested by a German trade magazine to achieve 0 to 62 mph in under six seconds, according to Porsche. 

This particular numbers-matching RS has 58,268 miles on the clock and a rebuilt drivetrain, brakes and suspension, as well as a reupholstered interior. It appears to be a clean and diligently cared-for example that would do well at any event. Add in the Paul Walker effect, and the right bidders might hit the nitro boost and land well beyond Mecum’s $1 million to $1.25 million estimate.

Click here to see all the photos of Paul Walker’s 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7.

Mecum Auctions

Monaco’s Late Prince Rainer Loved Cars. Now His World-Class Collection Has Moved to Its Own Museum.

Monaco’s Late Prince Rainer Loved Cars. Now His World-Class Collection Has Moved to Its Own Museum.

Think of revved engines and race cars, jetsetters and checkered flags and one place comes to mind: Monaco. It’s almost 100 years since the first Grand Prix took place there, one that’s now part of the petrolhead Triple Crown. Fast cars are a permanent fixture there, though: Garages in Monaco resemble more a Ferrari and Porsche showroom than a parking lot.

Wealth has helped Monaco stay at the forefront of high-end automobile excellence, of course, but it’s more than that. The late ruler, Prince Rainier III, was only six when that first Grand Prix took place, but cars became a lifetime obsession. He bought so many, in fact, that his private collection outgrew the garage at the palace—and so he opted to open them up to the public in 1993.

The assortment used to be housed in a soulless, cavernous space close to that palace complex in the Fontvieille district, about as inconvenient a site as possible in a 499-acre country (that’s smaller than Central Park). Thankfully, though, Rainier’s son, the present ruler Prince Albert, has just reopened his family’s collection in a brand-new site, right at the principality’s heart.

The façade of La Collection, where Prince Rainier III’s vast car collection is on display. 

Mark Ellwood

That new, custom-built home by architect Fabrice Notari took 10 years from start to finish. It’s a futuristic, almost 38,000-square-foot underground bunker that sits right on the Port Hercules. The new location is a nod to Monaco’s connections with F1, as it’s right by the double chicane dubbed the Piscine during the race. It’s also handily on the harbor where many superyachts berth—step off your yacht and you can now visit the collection within minutes. 
In the old space, the cars were lined up, almost dutifully, more like a kid might when playing with a few miniatures. Now, the royal family’s haul has been reinstalled in a smarter, pithier way, with 75 cars (both borrowed and crown-owned) ranging over two floors with a distinct sense of direction and curation.

A 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera. 

Mark Ellwood

There are teasers at the entrance, like the swaggering but featherlight 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera, one of the first to integrate racing performance into a road car. The visit truly starts, though, as you’re guided downstairs to the lower mezzanine. The display here focuses on the collection that Rainier himself assembled; there’s a regular vroom-vroom piped through the speakers to amp up the atmosphere.

The cars are clustered in various groupings: Take the museum’s own Concours d’Elegance, where they line up for inspection, show pony-style with a 1920s-era Rolls-Royce like a 40/50 HP Silver Ghost Limousine Barker, sturdy and elegant, or the eight-cylinder Delage Berlin from 1934. Look, too, for the case of glass vials, a rainbow of colors. “This is what they used to put real flowers in to scent the car,” Valerie Closier, the museum director and the daughter of an amateur rally driver, told Robb Report on a recent tour, “Now, we just have the pine trees.”

The Isetta “Bubble Car’” 

Mark Ellwood

Another section here is dubbed “The Beautiful Italians”—though it’s confusingly ranged against screens showing black and white movies featuring Elvis among others, while speakers blare 1950s pop. Most of these cars are gleaming, and lipstick-red, with the racy insouciance that’s so typical of Italian design. Take the Isetta—best known as the bubble car (pictured above)—that’s jauntily installed by the staircase, its front invitingly wide open; sadly, there’s no way to reach its butter-leather taupe seats. Tucked in one corner nearby is a 1950s race car legend: One of only seven Renault 1603s adapted for racing, it’s the sole one to have championed at the Le Mans 24 Hour race, in 1951.

The Renault 1603, which raced in Le Mans. 

Mark Ellwood

Prince Albert, the principality’s current ruler, offloaded almost 40 of his father’s favorites at auction a decade ago, from a 1956 Bentley S1 to a Berliet C2 from 1907. But his sale wasn’t a sign of waning interest; the current ruler is as much of a petrolhead as Grimaldi père. The upper level of the museum is dedicated to the race cars that Albert favors, among them Nigel Mansell’s Ferrari, which won him two F1 races. If you’re wondering what the latest addition is, just follow the selfie trail: There will usually be someone squatting down in front of the Ferrari driven by Charles Leclerc, which he loaned to the museum. And no wonder he picked this collection above all others—the 24-year old isn’t just a champion driver but one of the fewer than 40,000 people in the world who are Monaco born and bred.

54 route de la piscine, Port Hercule 98000 Monaco. Entrance fees €10 for adults, €5 for children.
Check out more photos of the prince’s car collection below:

Mark Ellwood

Mark Ellwood

Mark Ellwood

Mark Ellwood

Michael Alesi

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