Pieter Mulier

The 15 Best Looks from Pieter Mulier’s Second Show for Alaïa

The 15 Best Looks from Pieter Mulier’s Second Show for Alaïa

Alaïa FW22
Pieter Mulier unveiled his second collection for the storied house of Azzedine Alaïa off-schedule on Sunday, earning a standing ovation for his work. With the aim of keeping the signature house codes intact while adding a bit of himself to the collection, Mulier’s designs struck a balance between appealing to both, the younger and highbrow generations.

First seen in the creative director’s debut, mermaid and peplum hemlines were further exaggerated while the bell-bottoms were derived from the late Tunisian couturier’s Spanish skirts from 1982 and 1988. The collection was also big on tailoring which was important to Mulier, as seen in the slightly oversized coats and tuxedos in stark contrast to the figure-hugging catsuits and bodycon dresses that are making a comeback. The knitted dresses with face coverings were special in that they were a result of the fashion house’s collaboration with the Picasso Foundation and Mulier’s way of paying tribute to Alaïa who was close to the Spanish artist’s family. Each one mirrored the bottle-like ceramics Picasso created in the 1940s, in embroidery that took over the entire dress.
Bold, art-like, and pragmatic, the collection lends a hand to Mulier’s woman, which is one who dares to accept it. “You can put a skirt on it and style it down,” shared Mulier with Vogue. “We showed it on these beautiful women… they can. And if you want, you can.” Take a look at the best pieces from the Alaïa Fall 2022 collection below.
Alaïa FW22
Alaïa FW22
Alaïa FW22
Alaïa FW22
Alaïa FW22
Alaïa FW22
Alaïa FW22
Alaïa FW22
Alaïa FW22
Alaïa FW22
Alaïa FW22
Alaïa FW22
Alaïa FW22
Alaïa FW22
Alaïa FW22
Read Next: 12 of Azzedine Alaïa’s Best Red Carpet Fashion Moments

The Best Street Style at the Fall 2021 Couture Shows in Paris

The Best Street Style at the Fall 2021 Couture Shows in Paris

Photographed by Acielle / Style du Monde
Sixteen months after the pandemic hit Europe, the fall 2021 couture shows mark our semi-official “return” to live and in-person fashion shows. Many of us will still be viewing the collections online—we’re extra excited about Pieter Mulier’s debut at Alaïa and Demna Gvasalia’s first couture collection for Balenciaga—but for those lucky enough to attend IRL, the inevitable question is: What to wear? Will editors and influencers dust off the runway pieces and heels in the back of their closets, or will they be influenced by the casual, experimental looks we saw outside the menswear shows? Style du Monde’s Acielle is on the ground in Paris to find out. Scroll through her latest street style photos below, and come back for her daily updates.

Read Next: 5 Things to Know About Pieter Mulier’s First Show for Alaïa
Originally published on Vogue.com

5 Things to Know About Pieter Mulier’s First Show for Alaïa

5 Things to Know About Pieter Mulier’s First Show for Alaïa

Imaan Hammam. Photo: Courtesy of Alaïa
“It’s for my generation to explain to the younger generation what Alaïa is, and bring back sensuality, tailoring, and the ease it had in the ’80s,” Pieter Mulier told British Vogue of his fabulously democratic opening gambit at the storied house. Here, five things to know about Alaïa’s new look.
Photo: Courtesy of Alaïa
Pieter Mulier wants to democratise Alaïa
It wasn’t the pandemic that made Pieter Mulier move his first Alaïa show outside, into the street by the maison’s Le Marais ateliers, at 9 o’clock in the evening. “I would like to make it democratic again,” the Belgian designer said after the show. “In the ’80s, a lot of women bought Alaïa, especially in America. And then it became a little bit more gallery, more museum, more distant. That’s why we did the show in the street: to literally bring it to the street so you can see these pure lines, which are, in the end, simple sweaters and leggings that everybody wears.” Between Mulier’s tight, lustrous red or white evening dresses, plumed fishtail skirts that moved like waterfalls, and fringed monochromatic bandeaus, “simple” may not be the word that came to mind. But, as Mulier said, ease was always the magic ingredient to Azzedine Alaïa’s inimitable sense of sensuality.
Photo: Courtesy of Alaïa
The show was a new exercise in the grammar of Alaïa
Making women feel good is a feat often attributed to the Tunisian designer, who died in 2017. Alaïa did so, not through the sweats and sneakers that somehow define comfort today, but by constructing elegance through ease. In that ethos, Mulier detected an immediate contemporary relevance. “I wanted the first collection to be a white platform of the codes that are important for Alaïa, to explain it to the new generation, who doesn’t know it, unfortunately. It’s for my generation to explain to the younger generation what it is, and bring back sensuality, tailoring, and the ease it had in the ’80s.” While many young people will recognize the signatures of Azzedine Alaïa’s work – the hooded silhouette, the bandelette dress, the sculpted knitted skirt, the laser cut belts and boots – few perhaps see how to translate that into a real-life wardrobe. And so, Mulier set out to do just that.
Photo: Courtesy of Alaïa
Mulier almost left fashion
The designer was in talks with Alaïa’s parent company, Richemont, for nearly a year before taking the job. “I thought I wouldn’t do fashion anymore. After New York, I thought it was finished for me. I didn’t want to do it anymore: sneakers, sportswear, all of it,” he said, referring to his former job at Calvin Klein with Raf Simons, who attended his Alaïa debut. Mulier, who studied architecture, started interning for Simons’s eponymous label in 2002, and expanded his career working for him at Jil Sander and Christian Dior. When their New York adventure came to an end, he took a long break. “I talked to a few houses, but it was never on a human scale. I wanted something small.” Mulier found his answer in Alaïa, a house that always did things on its own terms, outside of fashion schedules, trends, and scrutiny. Now, Mulier’s challenge is to retain those values but create a connection to the elusive young generations.
Photo: Courtesy of Alaïa
The collection fused functionality and sexuality
Mulier’s proposition for the post-pandemic youth seemed tailored to that ambiguous sweet spot many are dealing with at a moment in time when dressing up feels foreign and fantastic all at once. You could find proposals for that sensibility in Mulier’s hybridized stocking-leggings – casual but very much not – or in the knitted dresses that twisted around the body as an alternative to the primness of a waisted dress. Sure, there was plenty of evening pizzazz, but at its core, his Alaïa collection was about reintroducing the founder’s codes to an everyday wardrobe. Take, for instance, those gladiator sandals feathered from a single piece of suede, his knitted mesh dresses, or the oversized shiny raincoats with lace trims; all embodied by functionality disguised in a big fashion statement.
Photo: Courtesy of Alaïa
Alaïa won’t turn into an influencer brand
In so many ways, Mulier’s Alaïa debut seemed made for a fashion show culture ingrained in social media, where the Amazon cast, high-octane sexuality, and pronounced glamour he put on his narrow outdoor runway (a photo op in itself) are sure to go viral. But Mulier said he isn’t going to pander to that market. “I don’t care about social media. I am on it, but I don’t think this is a house for social media. We talk about sexuality and how sex works on social media, so I hope it does something new for social media, but it’s not made for social media. It’s made for real life.” Don’t expect to see the usual celebrity suspects of that arena in Alaïa looks any time soon, either. “I said no to everybody so far. It’s such a small brand. It’s like an artwork. And I want to take care of it. The moment you throw it on It-girls or big influencer girls, it makes no sense any more, for me,” Mulier said. “We’ll build a family slowly, but I’m in no rush.”
Read Next: Your Coffee Table Requires This Beautiful Alaïa & Peter Lindbergh Book
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

Who is Pieter Mulier, the New Creative Director of Alaïa?

Who is Pieter Mulier, the New Creative Director of Alaïa?

Pieter Mulier. Photo: Pierre Debusschere

The name Pieter Mulier will be familiar to true fashion obsessives. The Belgian designer has had a hand in some of the most influential collections of the past 20 years, having started his career as an intern at Raf Simons’s eponymous brand in the early aughts and risen to become Simons’s righthand at Jil Sander and Christian Dior. When Simons was appointed the chief creative officer of Calvin Klein in 2016, Mulier was installed as his number two, with the title of creative director of womenswear.
But for many outside the industry, Mulier’s name and work might be less known. Maybe that makes him a perfect fit for Alaïa, founded by the Tunisian designer Azzedine Alaïa in Paris in 1980. The maison has long done things its own way, shying away from the fashion calendar and only showing a collection when it was deemed ready by Alaïa himself. Fans of the 2014 documentary Dior and I, which chronicled the making Simons’s first Dior Haute Couture collection, will find in Mulier a similar attention to detail and care.
Here, a breakdown of everything you need to know about Alaïa’s new creative director.
Mulier Isn’t Formally Trained in Fashion Design
Born in Belgium, Mulier studied at the Institut Saint-Luc in Brussels, a university that has produced an astounding amount of comic book artists and illustrators. Mulier, instead, studied architecture. His mentor Raf Simons studied industrial design at Genk’s LUCA School of Arts.
Raf Simons and Pieter Mulier take a bow after the Calvin Klein fall 2017 runway show in New York. Photo: Getty Images

Mulier Is Really, Truly Simons’s Right Hand
Thanks to Instagram, we know that Mulier started interning at Raf Simons amid the making of the brand’s fall 2002 Virginia Creeper collection. Since then, Mulier has been a constant presence by Simons’s side. He became the brand’s head designer by 2003, overseeing its menswear collections until 2010. From 2006 to 2009, he consulted at Jil Sander, where Simons was creative director, joining Jil Sander full-time in 2010. When Simons left Jil Sander in 2012, Mulier went with him; they took up residence at Christian Dior less than a year later.
“It evolved from being colleagues to a friendship now. I always think it’s like a ping-pong game,” Mulier told Another magazine in 2015 of his relationship with Simons. “He taught me a lot about art—you know his references are a lot of art and architecture—and luckily this is also my background, so this helps, and I think it works in both ways.”
But Mulier Did Not Join Prada With Raf Simons
When the pair’s stint at Calvin Klein ended in 2018, they returned to Antwerp. But while Simons worked on his eponymous label, Mulier seemed to be recalibrating. When the former was named Miuccia Prada’s co-collaborator at Prada in February 2020, the latter was not part of the deal, to the surprise of industry insiders. Many assumed a plum job was on the horizon, though it was Mulier’s partner, Matthieu Blazy, who made headlines with his appointment as the womenswear creative director at Bottega Veneta. Maybe we didn’t have our ears close enough to the ground: After nearly two years at home in Antwerp, Mulier is assuming one of the most coveted jobs in Paris, stepping into the shoes of a true master.
Read Next: Supermodel Cindy Bruna Remembers Her Most Cherished Memories with Azzedine Alaïa
Originally published on Vogue.com

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