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Peter Dundas Picks Eugenie Niarchos, Bianca Brandolini as Godparents

Peter Dundas Picks Eugenie Niarchos, Bianca Brandolini as Godparents

BABY LOVE: Peter Dundas and Evangelo Bousis are regulars in Greece, holidaying, and shooting some of the Dundas look books there, too. Last weekend, they traveled to the posh coastal suburbs south of Athens for an altogether different reason: the baptism, in the Greek Orthodox Church, of their two babies, Alexios, who’s a year old, and the three-month-old Eleni.The godmothers were Eugenie Niarchos and Bianca Brandolini, and guests included Naomi Campbell, Natasha Poly, Dree Hemingway, Prince Nikolaos and Princess Tatiana of Greece and Denmark, Laure Hériard Dubreuil, Aaron Young, Zani Gugelmann, Catherine Baba and Claire Courtin.
The Greek-Cypriot singer Anna Vissi performed at the party that followed at the Four Seasons Resort in Vouliagmeni.

While a baptism is a big moment for many Christian families, this particular baptism, which took place Saturday at the Panagia Faneromeni church in Vouliagmeni, was a milestone. Dundas and Bousis said it was the first Greek Orthodox baptism for the children of a gay couple in Greece.
The Archbishop of the Americas and the Patriarch of the Greek Orthodox Church baptized both children. Dundas said it was important to christen the children in the Greek Orthodox church “because Evangelo is Greek Orthodox and since our children were born, we’ve followed the traditions of the church.”
“We also thought it was important, in this time and age, that there was a change in the Orthodox Church, and that the children of gay and same-sex parents are able to be christened. We feel all children should have the opportunity to be blessed regardless of what faith and religion they believe in,” he said.
Dundas added that the Archbishop Elpidophoros of America “agreed all children are accepted in God’s eyes and have a right to be baptized. He is pushing for change in the Orthodox religion for the youth, and opening doors for everyone instead of turning people away,” he said.

Front Row at Dior Men’s Venice Beach Show With ERL

Front Row at Dior Men’s Venice Beach Show With ERL

“I’m a big fan,” Rita Ora told Tony Hawk.The American skateboarder was never more in his element at a fashion show, the Dior men’s and ERL presentation in Venice Beach, inspired by SoCal skate and surf culture.
Ora, with boyfriend and filmmaker Taika Waititi — both in baggy Dior suits — made their way to their seats, sat alongside Christina Aguilera and Daniel Levy.
Not far, also front row, were Leslie Odom Jr., Kid Cudi, Michael B. Jordan, Christina Ricci, Finneas, Henry Golding, Burna Boy, Winnie Harlow, Brooklyn Beckham with Nicola Peltz, Dee Ocleppo with Tommy Hilfiger and Diego Boneta — donning the opening look of the show, an iridescent silver suit, graphic button-down and loose tie.

“It’s my first time at a Dior show,” said the actor at the after party. “I’ve had a blast.”

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The venue “is iconic,” continued Boneta. “The show was great. I loved the looks.”
Dior men’s artistic director Kim Jones, teaming with Venice-based designer Eli Russell Linnetz of ERL, closed down Windward Avenue, building out a blue wave-like structure and runway overlooking the Pacific Ocean. There wasn’t much to see, however, on the gloomy, overcast day.
“So hazy,” said actor and social media star Edward Zo. It was his very first fashion show.
“It’s very exciting, very chaotic,” he said of first impressions. “It’s a good juxtaposition, because you have Venice, which is very gritty, and then this high fashion event.”
There were other new faces, like content creators Blake Gray and Chase Hudson, and fashion veterans, too, Amber Valletta and Kimora Lee Simmons.
“I absolutely love the collection,” said Simmons, who brought 19-year-old daughter Aoki. “I thought it was so vibrant, so colorful and so fun, so universal. It’s something for everyone.”
“I thought it was beautiful,” chimed in Aoki. “And I surf down here. I love it.”
The two wore Dior Saddle bags. “I borrowed this from her,” said Aoki, sporting a mini version. Grinning, she added, “Hopefully, I can keep it.”
With Louis Vuitton recently showing in San Diego and Gucci shutting down Hollywood Boulevard a couple of months ago, “it’s so nice seeing this spotlight” on Southern California, said “Bling Empire” star Christine Chiu, a fixture at fashion weeks. She was with her husband, Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Gabriel Chiu.
“I’m his plus one,” she said, with a smile, wearing a bedazzled minidress under a matching men’s top. She’s been buying both women’s and men’s and mixing the two.
“I mean, we’re kind of breaking out of the pandemic so why not zhoosh it up?” she said of the look.
L.A. hasn’t felt safe these days due to the impact of COVID-19, she added, and feeling exposed in the middle of Venice, “I was reassured that they have massive security everywhere, on every rooftop…We’re here in all our valuable pieces, so — I’m glad that they really amped up security.”
She was also glad to see the crowd the show brought out.
“Leave it to a men’s show to bring this full spectrum of fashion people,” said Chiu. “This is the best people sightseeing — not in terms of celebrity but in terms of style — that I’ve seen in a long time. Usually when I go to a Dior show, it’s Dior couture and all the ladies look alike. It’s very demure. This is such a cool, hip vibe.”

Paris Hilton’s Grammy Handbag Is Now an NFT on a Digital Ukrainian Platform

Paris Hilton’s Grammy Handbag Is Now an NFT on a Digital Ukrainian Platform

Peter Dundas is no stranger to the Grammy red carpet.The Norwegian designer, who lives in Los Angeles, dominated headlines in 2017 after creating Beyoncé’s entire wardrobe for music’s biggest night. And last night, at the 64th annual Grammy Awards in Las Vegas, eyes were on his custom yellow and orange ombré jumpsuit, made for singer-songwriter H.E.R., inspired by a look worn by Aretha Franklin in 1976.
But viewers may have missed another one of his designs at the award show: Paris Hilton’s martini-shaped handbag. Made with the backing of French vodka company Grey Goose (hence the shape), the piece is available starting Monday as an NFT through a 72-hour auction with DressX, a Ukrainian digital-only, multibrand platform.

Blue and silver, adorned with 3,404 handset Swarovski crystals, the accessory took about a month to create.

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“It made sense to do something that almost felt like a piece of jewelry,” Dundas said. “That’s how I approached it, and I tried different things or sketched up different possibilities of that. But I ended up just landing on something that felt very instinctual, which was the martini glass itself as a minaudière, like a clutch or a jeweled bag, and went from there.”

Peter Dundas
Courtesy/Magnus Sundholm

The design process was nothing but “fun,” Dundas said. Laughing, he added, “And it’s somewhat quite close to me for a personal reason, as a martini drinker.”
How does he take it?
“Very dirty, with three olives.”

Paris Hilton at the 64th annual Grammy Awards in Las Vegas.
Courtesy

It was a “no-brainer” to take part in such a project, he went on. And revealing the piece at a musical event “made total sense,” he said. “I’ve always dressed musicians and artists from the music industry, and that’s really happened very much by itself. I think every mood board I have, a good 50 percent are images from musicians from the past and from the present as well. The Dundas woman and the Dundas man is quite extroverted. It’s somebody who’s not afraid to be seen.”
Dundas will show his next collection in May, he revealed, but first, the brand will unveil its latest line with Revolve, as part of a partnership with the e-tailer, during Coachella. It’ll be his first time taking part in an activation during the music festival.
“I’m super excited to be doing that,” he said. “I’ve obviously been to Coachella before. I love festivals. But it will be a new experience. The world is kind of opening up again. Obviously, there are situations in this world that we have to be very mindful of, but I think, at the same time, people need to enjoy themselves. They need to have moments of decompression. They need to have moments where you can smile, where you have love, have friendship around you, and cultural enjoyment, like music.”

‘Morbius’ Star Adria Arjona Survives the Red Carpet With Hot Sauce and Rubies on Her Pinky

‘Morbius’ Star Adria Arjona Survives the Red Carpet With Hot Sauce and Rubies on Her Pinky

About four months ago, when Adria Arjona was beginning to prep for her upcoming “Morbius” press tour, she sat down with her stylist Danielle Goldberg and expressed her number-one goal for the tour: to wear Vivienne Westwood.“I love her shapes, I think she’s such an incredible designer, she really knows a woman’s body, and I just knew that that dress would give me all the feels that I wanted,” says the Puerto Rico-born actress, who stars in the new Marvel movie alongside Jared Leto.
For the film’s big Los Angeles premiere, Goldberg delivered in the form of a black Westwood gown and Tiffany jewels that had Arjona on cloud nine. The goal was to nod to the film’s living vampire theme, via the gown’s bat-like shape at the neckline and eye makeup meant to evoke bats.

“It was the perfect silhouette and it cinched at the waist and it almost felt like this queen of the bats look,” Arjona says. “The shape was so gratifying to us and to the movie — it resembled everything we wanted.”

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For hair, they were inspired by Morticia Addams, going for long, sleek and straight.
“The whole conversation that went around it was very much embodying the movie. We wanted to be a walking image of it,” the star says. “I felt so good — when I took it off I definitely turned into a pumpkin, I deflated.”
To accessorize, she wore rubies and diamonds from Tiffany.
“I had this 4-carat pinky ring that was so wild. I was like, ‘who wears 4 carats on their pinky?’” she says. “I was like, ‘OK, I’m that girl today.’”
Her one secret accessory? A miniature tube of Cholula inside her evening bag, a nod to her favorite Beyoncé lyric in “Formation.” That, and she’s particular about her hot sauce.
“I always bring a little hot sauce anywhere, I’m picky with my hot sauce and I love the fact that Cholula makes little mini ones. I’m not sponsored by them at all, by the way,” she says. “I like to put it on my popcorn. I like to have it just in case they have tabasco.”
“Morbius” has been a long time coming — in fact, it was about four-and-a-half years ago when she convinced director Daniel Espinosa to let her audition for the role, when he thought she was too young for the part.
“It was a different moment in my career — I was very much going through the whole process of auditioning. I mean, I still audition of course, but I just really had to fight for it,” she says. “I was like, ‘please believe me, please trust me — can I just audition and I’ll prove to you that I can be Martine?’” Luckily for her, Espinosa was convinced and the rest is history.
And as it turns out, “Morbius” is just the beginning of Arjona’s busy season. In June she’ll be seen starring in HBO’s remake of “Father of the Bride,” as well as the Star Wars spin-off “Andor”; the movie “Los Frikis,” and the HBO series “Irma Vep” with Alicia Vikander and Jerrod Carmichael.
“I’m really gonna saturate the market,” she says. “You guys are all gonna get sick of me.”
Such a schedule means even more red carpets in her future, something she now looks forward to, having adjusted to the experience over the years.

“I had such a great time last year playing all these women, and it’s probably one of the reasons that I love dressing up and doing these premieres, because you get to become a character, between hair and makeup and styling. And it’s really special,” she says. “I remember at the beginning of my career I felt like I was just wearing a dress, and it was really nerve wracking and red carpets really scared me and I didn’t enjoy the whole process of it, and now I think through Danielle, she’s really guided me through creating these women, and just makes me feel more comfortable and OK with 100 cameras pointing at me and screaming my name and telling me where to look. It’s like a shield — and what better a shield than a Vivienne Westwood gown and Tiffany rubies?”

Adria Arjona gets ready for the “Morbius” premiere in Vivienne Westwood.
Nino Muñoz

Adria Arjona gets ready for the “Morbius” premiere in Vivienne Westwood.
Nino Muñoz

Adria Arjona gets ready for the “Morbius”‘ premiere in Vivienne Westwood.

Tiffany & Co. jewels.
Nino Muñoz

Her secret accessory: hot sauce.
Nino Muñoz

Adria Arjona gets ready for the “Morbius” premiere in Vivienne Westwood.
Nino Muñoz

Adria Arjona gets ready for the “Morbius” premiere in Vivienne Westwood.
Nino Muñoz

Adria Arjona gets ready for the “Morbius” premiere in Vivienne Westwood.
Nino Muñoz

Adria Arjona gets ready for the “Morbius” premiere in Vivienne Westwood.
Nino Muñoz

Adria Arjona gets ready for the “Morbius”‘ premiere in Vivienne Westwood.
Nino Muñoz

Details Magazine Founder Annie Flanders Dies at 82

Details Magazine Founder Annie Flanders Dies at 82

Details magazine founder and cultural connector Annie Flanders died Thursday at age 82.Flanders died of natural causes at the Hollywood Hills, a Pacifica Senior Living Community, where she had been residing for several years, according to fashion writer and creative consultant Rose Apodaca. A member of The Neptune Society, as was the case with her late husband Chris, Flanders will be cremated.
Celebrations of Flanders’ life are being planned for Los Angeles and New York this spring.
As founding editor and publisher of Details, Flanders was honored in 1985 by the Council of Fashion Designers of America for her “fresh approach to journalism.”
Decades before trend forecasters, management consultant groups and algorithms dictated pop culture fashion’s force with consumers, Flanders helped guide the zeitgeist by not just observing it, but living it.  Aside from grasping the ins and outs of the apparel industry’s seasonal grind from firsthand experience, Flanders also understood how fashion, art, music and Manhattan’s downtown culture collided.

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Along the way she mined a slew of talents who came of age somewhere between the late Seventies and early Nineties. Anna Sui, Isabel and Ruben Toledo, Steven Meisel, Bruce Weber, Richard Tyler, Jeremy Scott, Stephen Gan, Arianne Phillips, Michael Schmidt and Patrick Kelly were among the talents that Flanders helped elevate. Perhaps the designer Betsey Johnson summed up the sentiments of many when she presented Flanders with her CFDA award, thanking her “for taking me seriously despite what I look like.”
Flanders helped expose the world to what was happening in the interlaced worlds of fashion, art, culture and more with a heavy emphasis on what the mainstream magazines weren’t covering, said Apodaca, who first caught Flanders’ attention in 1986 at the age of 18 by wearing a DIY “crazy outfit with a tutu and a ginormous green bow.”
Flanders was also an early advocate of the fight against AIDS, as a founding board member of the Design Industry Foundation for AIDS in 1984, the organization that is more commonly known as DIFFA. In that post for eight years, she helped create and co-chaired “The Love Ball,” an annual fundraiser that also showcased voguing, which Flanders featured in the pages of Details. Madonna was said to have first seen voguing at the event and later spotlighted it in her 1990 “Vogue” music video for MTV.
Flanders’ AIDS-related fundraising efforts included co-chairing the New York City edition of Live Aid, an event that spotlighted 80 designers in a fashion show that raised money for families in Ethiopia. Like much of her dealings, her connection to Africa was personal. In 1971,  Flanders and her husband moved there with their young daughter Rosie to help create jobs and offset the-then minuscule rate of employment. With the help of the king of the north province of Makala, they opened a factory to make leather clothes and handbags, Apodaca said. Their mission was to teach their 300 employees how to be self sufficient and to take over the factory when their two-year commitment ended. The family returned to New York in 1973.
Born Marcia Weinraub, Flanders legally changed her first name to “Annie” in the mid-Seventies because she preferred it. While attending New York University’s School of Commerce, Accounts & Finance in the late Fifties, she majored in retail and minored in journalism. Despite living a good part of her life in Los Angeles, Flanders had an inveterate New York streak – perhaps due in part to having won a New York City pageant in 1959.

Post-NYU, her fashion experience stemmed from an early job as an assistant fashion director at Gimbels department store, selecting items for window displays and coordinating fashion shows for the Manhattan outpost and suburban locations. Flanders moved on to a buyer role at Stern department store’s 42nd Street store.
By 1967, Flanders had ventured out on her own by opening the progressive boutique Abracadabra at 243 East 60th Street. Flanders once explained that she was keen to showcase “the new fashion designers and artists, who I was told were unacceptable for department stores because they either couldn’t put up advertising money or the production was too small or they couldn’t afford to accept returns.”
In tune with the youthquake street style that was storming cities like London and Los Angeles, and the independent boutiques that were cropping up to dress them, Flanders wanted to invent her own way, according to Apodaca. The  interior featured a mirrored sculpture that had been salvaged from a “Hall of Mirrors” in an abandoned amusement park in New Jersey. Flanders’ original press release for the store’s opening touted that it was located in the “Swingers District of Manhattan.” The clientele included Penelope Tree, Mia Farrow and Britt Ekland, among others. The retail spectacle garnered coverage in WWD, Vogue, The New York Times and Cosmopolitan.
In 1970, Flanders unveiled a second location at Lexington Avenue and East 51st Street, occasionally staging fashion presentations there that were televised.
After returning to the U.S. from Africa, she worked as a women’s and juniors’ buyer and merchandise manager at AG Field in Jackson Heights. During that run, she chronicled her fashion finds as a style columnist for the Soho Weekly News from 1976 through 1980. She then rallied former Soho Weekly News staffers Bill Cunningham, Stephen Saban, Dan Gershon, Ronnie Cook and others to launch Details in 1982.
Flanders once explained in an interview with The Daily Front Row how she came up with the magazine’s name in the most innocuous way. While living in Woodstock, N.Y., one afternoon her daughter returned from a friend’s house. Flanders’ questions about the friend’s family went unanswered. She reportedly advised her daughter “to get all the details” the next time that she went to somebody’s house and then jotted the word down because it would be a good name for a magazine.

With a knack for mining prominent creatives and an appreciation for the inexperienced, she set out to find new designers and give other unknown talents a place to showcase their work. What started with 48 pages evolved into 300-page issues. Flanders looked at the magazine from a wider lens than fashion incorporating writers, photographers, musicians and designers. The first issue featured six pages of Cunningham’s photographs and over time his metier could take up as much as 100 pages. The pair first met when Cunningham, who was working for WWD at that time, dropped by Abracadabra.
Although Flanders and her team crafted a downtown cultural magazine, Details had various incarnations through the years. A controlling interest was sold in 1984 to avoid a potential bankruptcy. It was sold to investor Alan Patricof in 1988, who sold it to Condé Nast  year later for $2 million. Conde relaunched the title in 2000 but shuttered it completely in 2015.
After Details, Flanders relocated to the West Coast and switched tracks to work as a realtor. She also continued as a fairy godmother of sorts to creatives in fashion, art and music, continuing to entertain locals and New York City transplants and visitors in her high-rise home.
Flanders would want to be remembered for “championing independent talent and not just fashion but artists and other creatives and even individual style maskers what we would call ‘influencers’ today. She made things happen and she took pride in that. She took pride in connecting people abd creating events and parties where they could connect. And she celebrated the freaks. We all talk about that.” Apodaca said.
Flanders was predeceased by her husband as well as her brother Howard. She is survived by her daughter Rosie Edwards and husband Brendan.

Five Italian Celebrity Stylists on Passion, Motivation and More

Five Italian Celebrity Stylists on Passion, Motivation and More

MILAN — Being a celebrity stylist goes far beyond the creation of an outfit or a look. Stylists create an aesthetic, a common thread that accompanies the artist in every performance.WWD spoke with Ramona Tabita, Nicolò Cerioni, Rebecca Baglini, Simone Furlan and Susanna Ausoni to discuss the research process behind each look, what it means to be a stylist in 2022 and what motivates them.
RAMONA TABITA
Ramona Tabita is a Sicilian-born celebrity stylist who curated the look of top model Mariacarla Boscono for the Venice Festival in 2021 and works with Italian pop singer Elodie, among many others. For Boscono, the stylist chose a vintage 2016 burgundy Jean Paul Gaultier dress matched with tights in the same color.

“I have always been an aesthete, so consequently fashion has always been a part of my life,” said Tabita. Dressing an artist and choosing their aesthetics is a very intimate and personal experience, so for Tabita “it is important to establish a relationship with them and once I have identified the vision they have of themselves, I shape it by proposing mine.”

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Ramona Tabita
Courtesy photo

By closely working with musicians and celebrities and guiding them in every important performance or red carpet look, Tabita has established close friendships with each of her clients. “The friendship was born after they trusted me, over time and also by sharing a path together,” she said. “The stylist shares the most prominent moments of the career with the artist, so I think it is inevitable that this bond will be created.”
Tabita also explained that, to make a look work, she constantly works with brands. She added that: “It is very important for me to view the collections live, to preview pieces that have not yet been communicated on the market and to work four hands with the creative team to create ad-hoc garments together.”
NICOLÒ CERIONI
For someone who “never had the intention to create fashion,” working as a celebrity stylist with Italian and international singers is something that perhaps not even he could have imagined. “I’m not a fashionista — fashion shows have never been my dream and fashion for me was just a representation of what I saw on performers — my idols have always been Madonna, David Bowie and Raffaella Carrà. For me, fashion tells something about performing art,” he said.
Cerioni has long collaborated with Italian rock band Måneskin, winner of last year’s Eurovision Festivall.

Nicolò Cerioni
Courtesy photo

His creative process “starts from a thousand inspirations: I love cinema, I read constantly, I like to do research. It’s a little bit of everything, and also I am very influenced by pop culture,” he said. Indeed, for the 64th edition of the Grammy Awards, Cerioni dressed Maneskin with total looks from Jean Paul Gaultier — rocking dresses made with Scottish motifs in yellow tones and tailored pieces.
The stylist also believes that “today, the visual part is no longer separated from the musical one, a complete and contemporary artist in my opinion has both things. Aesthetics must reflect the music, there is no separation.”
SIMONE FURLAN
Simone Furlan started working as a stylist by chance. “I studied art history and then worked as art director, and one day a friend of mine asked me if I would be interested in helping him create a look for a rap singer. I said ‘yes.’ I had never been a stylist before, but from there brands and talents started noticing me,” he said. Furlan is known for dressing young talents and singers in the Italian music scene, getting them noticed by brands that still have hesitation when it comes to dressing emerging talents.

For the Sanremo Music Festival last year, the stylist dressed 20-year-old Italian pop singer Madame with a total look from Dior. “It wasn’t easy. However, together with Maria Grazia Chiuri, we believed in the project of this very young girl who only had three songs out — it is sometimes difficult to make brands understand how important it is to dress our Italian talents.”

Simone Furlan
Courtesy photo

Furlan is also aware that to work with celebrities, there has to be a certain level of communication and often disagreement in order to achieve the desired look. “Sometimes I want to make my idea work so bad that I miss the moment of confrontation, and this was certainly penalizing. The lesson I learned working as a stylist is to cross-pollinate each other, to know each other, to change ideas.” When working with musicians, he likes to be inspired by the song and to work around it — through clothing he wants to reflect what the song is about, he explained.
At the moment, Furlan is working on a special project in collaboration with Vogue Italia and RAI for the Sanremo Festival: He will interview Italian stylists to better understand the process and work that goes behind creating each look.
REBECCA BAGLINI
While Rebecca Baglini’s journey to styling wasn’t simple, her passion for fashion stems from a very young age when, “my grandmother took me to the theater and there I started noticing costumes and clothing,” she said. Baglini learned how to sew, “but I wasn’t patient enough,” so then she “started drawing, but I wasn’t precise and so I thought there has to be something! I was changing draperies, I was modifying the clothes and putting them together in a different way. That’s when I realized I wanted to work as a stylist.”

Rebecca Baglini
Courtesy photo

When doing research for a look, Baglini prefers to find a common theme between the song and the outfit. “For a musical project I like to understand the key words of the songs, I always ask to listen to the pieces and songs in advance to have a clear plan of how I have to work,” she said.  Her focus “is linked to a very specific Italian era, even if obviously I always put an element of contrast, a stimulus that tries to unhinge [things].”
She is aware of the change that is happening in the fashion industry. “When I started doing this job, in 2012, I witnessed the big change. During that time brands started choosing talents and other out-of-the-ordinary types of beauty for their campaigns, shoots, runways. It was certainly groundbreaking then, but nowadays if we watch a fashion show and we only see models it makes it boring, there has to be an element of uniqueness.”

When asked why the role of the stylist is so important in the music scene today, Baglini responded: “I think I’m almost sorry that my work is so fundamental at times! I’m happy because obviously it’s my job, but on the other hand, if I think that music were born in an era where there was no TV and therefore only the voice was heard — I think there was a real loyalty to music.”
SUSANNA AUSONI
“My journey into the world of styling began a long time ago. I have always had a strong fascination with contemporary art. I discovered that there is a strong connection between art and fashion and from there a thousand doors, a thousand worlds, many imaginary [worlds] have opened,” said Susanna Ausoni.
The Milan-born stylist has always worked in the music scene. She started her career at MTV Italia where she began curating the image of countless Italian pop singers. Before planning the final look, she is to “consider the musical atmosphere. The project I have in front of me. I start from the music and rotate around it.”

Susanna Ausoni
Courtesy photo

Ausoni’s passion for music and fashion have always led her to play with clothes, to create characters and make the artist feel confident and powerful in the outfit. “I look at how people inspire me, I look at their feelings,” she added. Ausoni pointed out that newspapers and magazines often criticize looks of celebrities without taking into consideration the work and hours spent on them. “I like numbers in mathematics and philosophy. I never like them in a judgement. I think they can lead to insecurity, like any negative judgement, and make you lack courage to express yourself. Not only for artists, even people who don’t do this job and are simply reading an article.”

Madelaine Petsch’s Paris Couture Week Diary

Madelaine Petsch’s Paris Couture Week Diary

Madelaine Petsch headed to Paris last week for her first proper visit, taking in the couture shows from Fendi, Dior and Elie Saab. Below, the “Riverdale” actress writes in with her highlights and shares a behind-the-scenes photo diary of getting ready for the Fendi show.How was the show?
“The Fendi show was breathtaking. It truly immersed me in the story and vision so seamlessly and had me waiting in anticipation for each look.”
What was your favorite look?
“This beautiful black shiny minidress with a huge train on the back, shiny black belt and embellished tights. It was so chic yet youthful.”
What did you wear to the show?
“I wore a long-sleeved turtleneck minidress in a neutral pallet of cream, warm browns and black with some brown knee-high boots and a mini wrist bag to complete the look.”

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What do you like about Fendi?
“Well, I’m such a huge fan of Kim Jones and I personally love Fendi because every time I put it on I feel powerful. But more so than that, it’s incredibly versatile. There’s Fendi for every occasion.”
What have you been up to since arriving in Paris?
“This is my first trip longer than a day to Paris, so in between shows I’ve been trying to immerse myself in the city to the best of my ability! I went to the catacombs, vintage shopping, the Musée d’Orsay and on a serious mission for vegan croissants.”
What’s the best thing you’ve eaten?
“Every morning I’ve been having the mango at my hotel; something about the lime zest and the mango here is out of control, I’ll genuinely miss it. Also, vegan croissants, always.”
What’s your best Parisian fashion memory?
“This was my first fashion trip to Paris AND my first shows with all three of the houses, so the entire week was incredibly memorable for me. Every show was so special. I started the week off on a high note with Dior. They had gorgeous embellishments and embroidery galore that was timeless and incredibly exciting to experience. Then, the beautiful Elie Saab show was so vibrant and filled with spring colors. It was fun and playful with striking silhouettes. The week went out with a bang in the form of the Fendi show. The entire show was such an experience, not to mention the attention to detail, the shoes (!!), and how unique the vision was. It was a true honor to attend all three shows and see each house’s unique visions come to life.”

A photo from Madelaine Petsch from behind the scenes of the Fendi couture show.

Pre-show glam.
Courtesy

Madelaine Petsch readies for the Fendi couture show.

Madelaine Petsch readies for the Fendi couture show.

Madelaine Petsch readies for the Fendi couture show.

Madelaine Petsch behind the scenes of the Fendi couture show.

Madelaine Petsch ahead of the Fendi couture show.
Courtesy

Madelaine Petsch shares behind the scenes of the Fendi couture show.

Kate Middleton Chose Vogue Photographer Paolo Roversi for a Trio of 40th Birthday Portraits

Kate Middleton Chose Vogue Photographer Paolo Roversi for a Trio of 40th Birthday Portraits

Photo: Paolo Reversi
In the decade since she joined the royal family, the Duchess of Cambridge has honed her eye for photography, serving as the National Portrait Gallery’s patron, releasing her own images of Prince George, Princess Charlotte, and Prince Louis on their respective birthdays, and launching her Hold Still initiative during the pandemic. It’s natural then that, for her 40th birthday on January 9, Kate eschewed sitting for a painter, instead commissioning Italian photographer (and frequent Vogue contributor) Paolo Roversi to shoot a trio of portraits in Kew Gardens.
Photo: Paolo Reversi
Taken in November, the shots depict the Duchess in a series of ballgowns against a neutral backdrop. Over the course of 2022, the portraits will be displayed in locations with “special meaning” to Kate, according to Kensington Palace. The first, Berkshire, is where she was raised and where the Middleton family still lives; the second, St Andrews, is where the future Duchess famously met Prince William as a history of art student; and the third, Anglesey, is where the Duke and Duchess rented a cottage just after their 2011 wedding.
Photo: Paolo Reversi
The exact locations where the portraits will be displayed will be revealed shortly, and will form part of a wider National Portrait Gallery initiative, titled Coming Home. While the NPG – which is due to reopen in 2023 after a major refurbishment – is closed, many of its treasures are on show in locations across Britain, from Vanessa Bell’s portrait of Virginia Woolf at Charleston to Olivia Rose’s shot of Stormzy in the Museum of Croydon. Roversi’s three portraits of the Duchess will form part of the institution’s permanent collection from next year.
In the meantime, start planning a weekend break to Anglesey…
Read Next: 14 Times Kate Middleton Showed Us How to Re-Wear an Outfit and Make It Look Brand New
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

This Fashion Enthusiast Is Spotlighting Her Late Mother’s Vintage Wardrobe in a Unique Way

This Fashion Enthusiast Is Spotlighting Her Late Mother’s Vintage Wardrobe in a Unique Way

Lakkis in Max Mara and Valentino. Photo: Leen Lakkis
In a heartfelt narration of a mother’s admiration for fashion, stylist Leen Lakkis has formulated a visual eulogy for her mother, who passed away six years ago from cancer, through a campaign named ‘Femme en Movement’. Translating to “woman on the move,” the campaign spotlights some of Lakkis’s mother’s most cherished vintage staples, which she frequently wore during her travels for treatment. The wardrobe highlights her changing approach to fashion, which was influenced by different cultural exposures. And most would agree that nothing keeps a loved one’s spirit alive more than their clothing, which carries their scent, stories, and memories.
Chanel shoes. Photo: Photo: Leen Lakkis
Also featuring portraits of Lakkis’s mother in her favorite garments, the campaign praises bold color combinations and out-of-the-box designs created by the industry’s greatest icons, including Dolce & Gabbana, Prada, Saint Laurent, Chanel, MiuMiu, and Valentino. “Through Femme En Mouvement, I was able to revive the early 2000s from my late mother’s unique pieces, all while optimistically looking at the present moment,” Lakkis elaborates.
Without having to express herself through words, Femme en Movement honours Lakkis’s mother using timeless, much-loved pieces that promise to forever make a statement. Lakkis’s mother communicated her love for fashion by purchasing pieces she hoped her children would one day wear with pride, and this photo series brings her vision to life. “My mother is my everyday muse,” Lakkis says. “Her endless love and evolving taste in fashion left a huge mark in my everyday life. She’s my inspiration behind everything I do, and all what I want in the world.”
Photo: Leen Lakkis
Through this campaign, Lakkis hopes to portray her mother’s restless dedication to fashion and her belief in its power to uplift one’s spirits. She released it in October 2021, coinciding with Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and hopes to echo the importance of early prevention. “The cause has always meant a lot to me and my surroundings, so I took this opportunity to express my unlimited love to my late mother along with the fight towards awareness for sancer in general,” Lakki says.
Read Next: Big Shoulders and Lots of Vintage: How Lady Gaga Got Dressed for House of Gucci

Fashion Consultant, Show Producer and Stylist Janet Racy Dies at 69

Fashion Consultant, Show Producer and Stylist Janet Racy Dies at 69

Janet Racy, a fashion and lifestyle consultant, died Thursday at age 68 at the Long Island Jewish Medical Center in Forest Hills, N.Y.She died from complications from surgery following a long illness, according to her friend Lisa Silhanek. Services have not yet been planned and a celebration of her life will be held at a later date.
Roach worked as a trend forecaster, spokesperson, stylist, designer, visual display specialist, show producer and in other capacities. Many knew her as the director of fashion merchandising at Harper’s Bazaar, a post she held for five years until 1992. Prior to that, Racy served as vice president and fashion director of women’s apparel for the Associated Dry Good Corp., whose members included Lord & Taylor, J.W. Robinson and L.S. Ayres. During her career, she worked with brands and designers including Christian Francis Roth, Karl Lagerfeld, Thierry Mugler, Alber Elbaz and Kleinfeld. Racy also worked in special events, films and commercials.

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Roth said Friday that after designing his first collection, he first met Racy through his girlfriend at that time, who is now his wife. After she called Racy at Harper’s Bazaar, Roth packed away his designs in a garment bag and walked to the magazine’s offices with a model friend to show Racy. “She was just beside herself. It was the first person I had ever shown my work to. Right away she called Marylou Luther and Lynn Manulis, the head of Martha boutique on Park Avenue. She was such a champion of my work early on and made introductions that shaped my entire career,” Roth said. “She put on a headset and called my first show from backstage. She helped calm me down, when I was worried or upset in preparation for the first show. She had a hand in sales, the merchandising, the styling, the model casting, the calling of the show. I just remember her there at all hours, not just for the first show but for the first several.”
Unfailingly positive, Racy excelled at putting people together, Roth said. “If she saw there was a talent, she was genuinely ecstatic about introducing that talent to the people that she knew. Putting people together, launching design careers — she had an outsized role in the industry in that regard,” he said.
Through the years, Racy, who started her own consultancy business in 1992, periodically appeared on television like Oprah Winfrey’s talk show, NBC’s “The Today Show” and QVC, among others. She also lectured and taught classes at universities and corporations. Racy also freelanced for fashion and lifestyle magazines. Well-informed about an array of subjects, Racy was not only smart, but she was nice, according to Luther. “Her major contribution was to prove that there could be goodness in the fashion world. And she was goodness. It didn’t all have to be make believe and let’s do the best we can to make it look good. She was real,” Luther said.
Kleinfeld co-owner Mara Urshel recalled Friday how she hired Racy to produce fashion shows for the bridal retailer with different organizations 21 years ago. ”At that time, fashion shows were more entertaining than just models going down the runway. Janet really worked with us and taught our marketing people every little thing about what has to be done to set up a fashion show — the photographers, sets, lights — everything. Jennette Kruszka, who is my director of marketing, said she learned everything she knows from Janet Racy.”

Describing Racy as “such a sincere, warm, intelligent and honest person, who you just loved being with,” Urshel said their friendship endured after they stopped working together. “You don’t run into too many of them in your life. The ones that you do, you really hold in esteem.”
Racy graduated from the Fashion Institute of Technology majoring in apparel design and later went on to earn a BA in textiles and clothing from Queens College, as well as a MA in retail marketing from New York University. A member of the Fashion Group International, The Round Table of Fashion Executives and FIT’s Alumni Association, Racy also served on Kent State University’s advisory board and was a visiting guest at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.
Manulis’ son Andrew Burnstine met Racy while studying together at NYU in the late Eighties. Racy wrangled clothes from Bill Blass, Oscar de la Renta and others and produced and created “Clothes Encounters of the Third Kind” for a retail marketing class. “Janet even was so persuasive in those early days in convincing America’s top designers to loa us clothes for the show.” Burnstine said.
In addition to Roth, She also was instrumental in working with Martha’s to feature and promote designers like Josie Natori, Jeanette Kastenberg, Badgley Mischka, Joanna Mastroianni and Zang Toi, Burnstine said.
Racy is survived by her brother John.

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