Pagani

Pagani Doesn’t Plan to Stop Making V-12 Hypercars Anytime Soon

Pagani Doesn’t Plan to Stop Making V-12 Hypercars Anytime Soon

Pagani is sticking to what it knows—for now.

At a time when the rest of the auto industry is embracing electrification, the boutique hypercar maker says it will continue to build vehicles powered by V-12s for the foreseeable future, according to Autocar. The marque’s founder doesn’t think an EV could live up to the Pagani name yet.
Brands like Lamborghini and Bugatti may be developing battery-powered models, but the internal-combustion engine still reigns supreme as far as Pagani is concerned. It’s not that the brand hasn’t thought about making an EV, but after four years of research Horacio Pagani doesn’t think the technology has advanced far enough. Specifically, he feels that EVs currently lack emotion and are too heavy because of their battery packs.

The Pagani Huayra Roadster BC 

Pagani

“The challenge is to make an EV that gives good emotion like a normal ICE. Pagani isn’t going to do something just with good performance, as you can do this [now], but to give emotion to the driver,” he told the British magazine. “The idea should be to make a lightweight car, but this is the biggest challenge. The dream would be a [2,866-pound) EV, but this isn’t possible.”
Although Autocar and other outlets initially reported that Pagani was pulling the plug on EV development, that doesn’t appear to be the case. On Friday morning, one day after the publication’s story ran, the marque told Top Gear that while it does not believe it could currently produce an EV that would meet its high standards, it will continue to explore the possibilities of electrification going forward.
“We will launch when the technology is ready,” a spokesperson for the brand told the website, “and the Pagani EV will be unmistakably and quintessentially ‘Pagani’.”

Pagani did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Robb Report on Friday afternoon.
It’s a good thing the automaker isn’t completely anti-EV. While enthusiasts may rejoice at the news of at least one hypercar sticking with the V-12, selling those cars might prove to be increasingly difficult going forward. At the end of June, Europe agreed to ban the sale of all gas- and diesel-powered vehicles starting in 2035. While the automaker’s sales don’t all come from its home continent, one expects that countries and continents will soon follow in its footsteps.

Pagani Will Make Just 5 of Its New 840 HP Longtail Huayra

Pagani Will Make Just 5 of Its New 840 HP Longtail Huayra

Pagani may be best known for its futuristic hypercars, but it still understands the value of looking to the past for inspiration.

The Italian marque has just unveiled a new variant of the decade-old Huayra called the Codalunga. Limited to only five examples, the latest version of the brand’s second model sports an ultra-aerodynamic longtail design.

Pagani has already said it hopes to unveil a third model later this year, but it’s not ready to say goodbye to the Huayra just yet. Since the hypercar made its debut at the Geneva Motor Show way back in 2011, the automaker has released eight different variants, along with 13 one-off examples. The latest version—which is the handiwork of the company’s re-branded special projects division, Pagani Grandi Complicazioni—may be the one that stands out the most thanks to a reworked shape inspired by Le Mans race cars of the 1960s.

Inside the Huayra Codalunga 

Pagani

The difference can be seen in the Codalunga’s streamlined fascia and smoother lines but comes through most clearly in its completely redesigned rear section. The new rear engine cover is 14 inches longer than that on the original Huayra coupé and covers over 12 square feet of space. The back of the car also lacks a grille, giving you an unobstructed view of its new ceramic-coated exhaust system, which weighs 9.7 pounds. The car’s elegant interior has been left untouched, but the new exterior is radically different, allowing it to cut through the air with even less drag.
Underneath the Codalunga’s giant new engine cover is an uprated version of the AMG-sourced twin-turbocharged 6.0-liter V-12 that’s been at the heart of past Huayras. This time around it can pump out 840 horses and 811 ft lbs of twist. For comparison’s sake, the original version of the hypercar’s mill was capable of producing 730 hp and 738 ft lbs of torque. No performance numbers have been released for the variant, but considering its new shape and relatively low curb weight (Pagani says the vehicle weights just 2,822 pounds) we’d be willing to wager it won’t lack for speed.

The Huayra Codalunga’s twin-turbocharged V-12 

Pagani

The Huayra Codalunga costs $7.4 million. That’s almost a mil more than the model’s previous most expensive variant, the Tricolore, which started at $6.7 million. Only five will be made, though, all of which are already spoken for. That doesn’t mean you’ve missed out on the longtail Huayra, though. We have a feeling one will end up on the auction market at some point. Just be prepared to pay even more for it.

Check out more photos of the Huayra Codalunga below:

Pagani

Pagani

Pagani

Pagani

From Rivian to Lucid, Start-Up EV Makers Are Flourishing—But for How Long?

From Rivian to Lucid, Start-Up EV Makers Are Flourishing—But for How Long?

As an automotive journalist of a certain vintage, I get approached from time to time for the occasional special project. A few years ago, I worked with a private-equity house that was considering investing in small British sports-car makers. As part of our research, we identified 22 new or revived brands that had launched over the previous 15 years, such as Invicta and Austin-Healey. Of those 22 start-ups, just one had survived: Ariel, which is still making its extreme, exoskeletal two-seaters to great acclaim but in tiny numbers.

Designing a new car is the easy bit; building it to scale with doors that thunk nicely is really hard. Ariel has endured by not bothering with either scale or doors—nor a windshield (unless ordered), roof nor pretty much any of the “comforts” of a conventional car. But a company building vehicles this way—simple to bolt together but with very limited appeal—is never going to make much money or announce an IPO. The other 21 start-ups, which mostly attempted to make normal sports cars, found it took longer and cost more than they hoped or could bear. It always does. The private-equity guys spent their cash elsewhere.
Until recently, the auto industry was better known for the demise of venerable old brands, such as Saab and Pontiac and Oldsmobile, than for the addition of new ones. Yet optimism and opportunism have always triumphed over the lessons of history, and I’ve often found myself reporting on yet another sports, luxury or EV start-up. I’ve taken them all seriously but not held my breath for their success.

But things are changing. There are arguably more credible start-up carmakers now—at least 20—than at any time since the earliest Wild West years of motoring in the 1900s and 1910s, when free thinking and divergence of design ruled the day. New premium brands such as Rivian, Lucid and Fisker aim to establish themselves as volume automakers while a raft of small-production, electric-hypercar start-ups such as Rimac, Drako and Piech are developing pure EVs with extreme performance to appeal to a younger clientele, often previously uninterested in fossil power.

The 2021 Rivian R1T. 

Rivian

The reasons for this sudden flourish are twofold (and kinda obvious): Tesla and electrification. Some will tell you that electric cars are easier to engineer than those with combustion engines, opening the door to novel entrants, but that’s not necessarily the case. Yes, fewer moving parts sit under the hood, but making the system function efficiently and striking the right balance between power, weight and range are truly challenging. That’s why brands such as Tesla and Rimac, which have been working hardest and longest on their own proprietary propulsion tech, still have a decisive lead in many areas over the mainstream carmakers, for all their R&D billions.

And sure, as a start-up you can just buy an electric drivetrain or even a complete rolling chassis from a supplier, which you can then clothe in a body of your own design. But carmakers have always been able to do that, sourcing engines from Mercedes, say, as Pagani and Aston Martin do.
Instead, the opportunity comes from the disruption being wreaked on the auto industry by electrification. It feels like the Wild West again, with a land grab to claim a spot in the EV territory. Mainstream carmakers have been slow to bring their own electric examples to market and haven’t always fully exploited the opportunities offered by EVs when they do. Customers are more open-minded, and we’re prepared to break old buying habits alongside our addiction to gas. And the huge capital needed to start mass-manufacturing cars is flowing relatively cheaply and easily from SPACs, deep-pocketed funds and individuals who want to be in on the ground floor of the next Tesla. The process is still costing more and taking longer than planned, but now you’re more likely to find the cash to cover it.
But while upstarts can make EVs, should we be buying them? As a consumer, you don’t want to be stuck with an automotive orphan whose parent company has died and taken with it the parts and ability to have your vehicle serviced in the future. You want your new car from a new maker to be the start of a fresh chapter in the history of motoring, not a footnote. But how do you spot the likely winners, either as a buyer or an investor?
It’s tough. We once thought up-and-comer premium brands needed to offer quality and a customer experience to match that of Porsche or Mercedes, which any start-up would struggle to do from the outset. But Tesla appears to be disproving that. Its riotous success is seemingly unaffected by its well-publicized quality woes. And I recently collected a Tesla from one of its delivery centers in the UK: a cheap white tent erected in a vast, otherwise deserted parking lot and heated (ironically) by a noisy diesel generator. It had all the comfort and glamour of a battlefield dressing station, but the paying customers around me didn’t seem to care. They just wanted their wheels.

The Tesla Model X. 

Tesla

That the vehicles themselves are so appealing and distinctive means we’re more apt to overlook these shortcomings. Stand- out design and a killer set of numbers are more important than the quality of the coffee in the showroom. It was easier for Tesla to gain an advantage here when the mainstream manufacturers hadn’t really woken up to EVs. Rivian is likely to have those advantages over most of its truck rivals, at least for a while, but in passenger cars it’s going to be harder for Tesla to maintain its lead—or for the newcomers to build one—as the legacy carmakers raise their EV game and everyone levels up. The new entrants will need to keep thinking and designing like start-ups, even when they no longer are.
Not all these newcomers are electric, of course. Gordon Murray’s T.50 hypercar uses a gloriously simple, naturally aspirated V-12 engine and a manual gearbox, and British chemicals billionaire Jim Ratcliffe is building the utilitarian, combustion-powered Ineos Grenadier off-roader to plug the gap left as Land Rover’s Defender moves upmarket.
But it’s the EV start-ups that excite me the most. They have the chance to change everything: the shape of the car industry, the markets and the rate at which we shift to electric propulsion and cut our emissions. If I conduct my survey of the current crop of start-ups again in 15 years’ time, when the disruption has eased and a little peace has come to this automotive Wild West, I think I’ll find more than one still standing.
Ben Oliver is an award-winning automotive journalist who writes from the UK.

Hypercar Designer Horacio Pagani on Collecting Porsches and Reading Leonardo da Vinci

Hypercar Designer Horacio Pagani on Collecting Porsches and Reading Leonardo da Vinci

Like Leonardo da Vinci, the Renaissance master who inspires him, Horacio Pagani resides at the intersection of creativity and analytics. A true outlier, the 66-year-old hypercar designer and manufacturer combines latent talent, an innovative approach and enough flair to develop a model line that’s arguably the most exclusive in production: Fabergé eggs—crafted from noble alloys and bleeding-edge composites—capable of 220 mph (and more).

Hailing from Casilda, Argentina, Horacio completed the construction of a single-seat race car for the Formula 2 Championship series at the age of 24. Soon drawn to Italy, he helped Lamborghini pioneer the use of composite materials before starting his own atelier, Modena Design. It was all building to the formation of Pagani Automobili and the debut of his Zonda C12 at the 1999 Geneva International Motor Show. Despite the demand for his current $3.1 million Huayra R—of which only 30 examples will be built—and his diversification into industrial design projects that include furnishings as well as aircraft and commercial interiors, Horacio refuses to focus on his accomplishments. “I don’t like to use the word ‘success,’ and don’t like it used within the company,” he says. “We will use that word when [Pagani Automobili] turns 100 years old. It’s about small improvements and results.”

Who is your guru?
I have one of the most complete collections of Leonardo da Vinci’s books, which includes all his artwork and drawings, and have only read 20 percent of it so far.

How has he influenced your design philosophy?
“Art and Science” is the company’s motto, a teaching of Leonardo’s combining scientific research and research of beauty. Our mission is therefore to be able to create an object that can tell a story, that can trigger emotions.
What have you done recently for the first time?
My life is always about the first time; every day I try to find something new to impress me, a new stimulus.
First thing you do in the morning?
I wake up very early and shower, then take an hour for breakfast while my dogs look on. I make coffee for my wife, then go Nordic walking for an hour around the park near my home before showering again and biking to work.

Horacio with his Olympia bicycle. 

Martino Lombezzi

What, apart from more time, would make the biggest difference to your life?
I can’t ask for more than what I have; I really like my routine.
What apps do you use the most?
I use WhatsApp for messaging, a weather-forecast app so I know what to wear, finance apps and Spotify—a lot—for music.
What advice do you wish you’d followed?
I have tried to put into practice all the advice given from my parents and other people I’ve met during my life, but I would like to learn how to have more of a sense of humor about myself—to be less hard on myself.
What do you do that’s still analog?
Everything I do is analog. I was recently on an eight-hour flight and wanted to watch a movie, but the airplane was old and the interface was not that user-friendly, so I ended up reading a book.

At his own museum, a portrait of Horacio flanks those of mentors, including racer Juan Manuel Fangio (framed at bottom). 

Martino Lombezzi

What in your wardrobe do you wear most often?
Lately I’m wearing jogging attire and trainers because the relaxed clothing makes me feel like I’m not working. And when I’m with a client, I’m always very casual and never wear a tie.
What do you crave most at the end of the day?
A walk with my wife and dogs. I don’t have a crazy social life.
How do you find calm?
Meditation, even if there are a thousand people around me. I do it up to three times a day, from a few minutes to a half hour.
What song is currently in your head?
I always go around with headphones, as listening to music helps me switch from one project to another—whether designing a car or interiors for a hotel or a helicopter—and I like to have different music for every project.
What’s the most impressive dish you cook?
Normally my wife cooks at home, and she cooks very well, but everyone in the family is capable. My most impressive dish is asado, what you call barbecue.
Who is your dealer, and what do they source for you?
I mainly collect cars and really like Porsches, so when the president of Porsche Italia has something new coming up, he calls me. I also collect model cars and exchange them with colleagues.

The Pagani Zonda S 7.3. 

Martino Lombezzi

If you could learn a new skill, what would it be?
To start playing piano.
How much do you trust your gut instinct?
I have to make a lot of decisions and take responsibility, so I have to trust myself. Whether an entrepreneur, a magazine director or a school principal, all those important roles, in the end they are alone in making decisions, so they have to trust their instincts.
Where do you get your clothes?
I don’t enjoy shopping; usually my wife buys clothes for me. But I really like to go to Armani in Milan. I like the designer himself—he’s smart and creative—and I feel good when wearing his clothing.
Drive or be driven?
To be driven—unless it’s a sports car. Then I prefer to drive myself.
Are you wearing a watch? How many do you own?
Right now, I’m not wearing one. I have some timepieces, more than what I need—an Apple watch for the health apps and a Patek Philippe when I want to be elegant. There’s also one from Richard Mille, and he’s my friend, but I’m not really into the watch world.

A Patek Philippe Calatrava Ref. 6000. 

Martino Lombezzi

If you could stick at one age, what would it be and why?
I would love to be 20 years old, of course. How could I answer differently? But I’m also happy in my 60s.
What is the car you are most attached to?
The Porsche 917. Unfortunately, I don’t have one.
What’s your most treasured possession?
My sons.
Bowie or Dylan?
Brian McKnight, John Legend, James Taylor and Christopher Cross.

One of the First Pagani Huayra’s Could Be Your Christmas Gift To Yourself This Year

One of the First Pagani Huayra’s Could Be Your Christmas Gift To Yourself This Year

With less than 300 ever built, it’s rare to see a Pagani Huayra or one of its variants hit the market. Fortunately for those of us still scrambling to find gifts this holiday season, one just went up for grabs.

An example from the hypercar’s first year of production is currently up for bid on online auction platform Collecting Cars. This isn’t just one of the first Huayras, though. It’s also been upgraded with the Pacchetto Tempesta performance package, making it even more capable than when it rolled off the line.

The Huayra was first announced at the beginning of 2011, and made its official debut at that year’s Geneva Motors Show. It is the successor to the Italian marque’s first model, the Zonda, and is named after the Incan god of wind, Huayra-tata. It’s also a true hypercar with a futuristic design, gull-wing doors and a Mercedes-AMG-sourced powertrain.

2011 Pagani Huayra – Pacchetto Tempesta 

Collecting Cars

The coupé is part of the initial 100-car production run, all of which were built between 2011 and 2018. Its flamboyant body is finished in metallic silver, only broken up by a carbon-fiber front splitter, side view mirrors and rear panel and diffuser. Open up its doors and you’ll find a luxe cabin covered in black leather with white contrast stitching offset by more carbon fiber. Like other hypercars it’s not particularly spacious, but there is a matching luggage storage area hidden beneath its rear clamshell.
Powering the Huayra is a twin-turbocharged, 6.0-liter V-12. Mated to a seven-speed Xtrac automated manual transmission that sends power to the rear wheels, the mill is capable of churning out a thrilling 740 horses, according to the auction listing. While any Huayra is special, this one was upgraded with the Pacchetto Tempesta (which translates to Storm Pack) performance package in 2016, which improved airflow and created more downforce. Other upgrades include four-way adjustable Ohlins shock absorbers, a bespoke titanium exhaust system and new forged aero-grade wheels in the front and back. The car has also been used sparingly over the last decade, and has just 2,194 miles on the odometer.

Inside the Pagani Huayra – Pacchetto Tempesta 

Collecting Cars

If you’ve ever wanted to add a Huayra to your collection, you have until Wednesday to put in a bid for this one. Bidding is currently up to $1.98 million, which is almost a bargain considering the hypercar cost $2.6 million brand new (and that’s before adding in an extra $180,000 for the Pacchetto Tempesta). Relatively speaking, of course.

Check out more photos of the Pagani Huayra – Pacchetto Tempesta below:

Collecting Cars

Collecting Cars

Collecting Cars

Collecting Cars

Collecting Cars

This 1-of-10 Pagani Zonda R Evolution Supercar Could Be Yours for $6.5 Million

This 1-of-10 Pagani Zonda R Evolution Supercar Could Be Yours for $6.5 Million

An ultra-rare example of Pagani’s engineering prowess is now up for grabs RM Sotheby’s.

The four-wheeler in question is a 2010 Pagani Zonda R Evolution that is available via a private sale at RM Sotheby’s for the handsome fee of $6.5 million. The immaculate black beauty, which has covered just 632 miles in its lifetime, represents the pinnacle of Pagani engineering and has an exceptional pedigree.

Pagani unveiled the first Zonda, the C12, at the Geneva Motor Show in 1999. The Italian marque followed up with a few high-octane variants over the next few years before unveiling the Zonda R in 2007. Touted as Horacio Pagani’s tour de force, this was the automaker’s first track-focused beast and was unequivocally ferocious. In fact, it still holds a Nürburgring record for completing the racecourse in 6 minutes 47 seconds in July 2010.

The 800 hp beast has not one but two rear wings and quad tips. 

Karissa Hosek/RM Sotheby’s

This particular model is the fifth of just 10 Zonda Rs built between 2009 and 2011, according to the auction house. It’s also one of only a handful to be upgraded to the Evolution spec that includes a bump in horsepower, as well as a set of lightweight magnesium alloys, a smaller secondary wing underneath the standard rear wing and additional dive planes on the front corners for extra downforce. This specific Evolution also sports exposed carbon fiber bodywork with “tricolore” accents throughout and the signature quad exhausts.
Under the hood, the Zonda R is powered by a naturally aspirated, Mercedes-Benz 6.0-liter V-12 engine mated to a six-speed sequential transaxle. The tuned Evolution can churn out a gutsy 800 hp while the regular Zonda R is good for 740 horses. With a formidable power-to-weight ratio and lightning-quick gear changes, the Zonda R can sprint from zero to 60 mph in 2.7 seconds and hit more than 230 mph at full tilt.
RM Sotheby’s says this is the first Pagani Zonda to be offered publicly in the US market, which helps explain that hefty price tag. Hey, nobody said owning a piece of Pagani history would come cheap.
Check out more photos below:

Karissa Hosek/RM Sotheby’s

Karissa Hosek/RM Sotheby’s

Pietro Martelletti/RM Sotheby’s

Pietro Martelletti/RM Sotheby’s

Pietro Martelletti/RM Sotheby’s

Pietro Martelletti/RM Sotheby’s

Pietro Martelletti/RM Sotheby’s

Pietro Martelletti/RM Sotheby’s

This Ultra-Rare 800 HP Pagani Zonda Revolución Track Racer Could Be Yours

This Ultra-Rare 800 HP Pagani Zonda Revolución Track Racer Could Be Yours

Nobody does bespoke quite like Pagani. For proof, just look at this rare, tailor-made Zonda Revolución that’s currently being readied for auction.

The Italian marque first unveiled the Revolución back in June 2013 as a swan song of sorts for the Zonda. Based on the track-only Zonda-R, the high-powered hypercar was limited to just five examples which makes it especially coveted among collectors.

This particular example is believed to be the only one of the quintet to sport a blue carbon-fiber exterior that would make Horacio Pagani’s heart swell with pride. (Robb Report reached out to confirm this, but the marque is yet to respond.) This theme extends to the luxe interior, which features swathes of carbon fiber and blue accents. The seats are also clad in two-tone blue Alcantara and leather while the air vents and various gauges sport a similar hue.

The Revolución’s V-12 can churn out 800 hp and 538 ft lbs of torque. 

Beyond aesthetics, the Revolución packs the breakneck speed and thrilling performance of a trophy snatching race car. Under the hood, it packs the same Mercedes-Benz AMG 6.0-liter V-12 found in the Zonda R, which is mated to a transversely mounted, magnesium-cased six-speed sequential gearbox that snaps from gear to gear in 20 milliseconds.
The setup allows the 2,359-pound beast to churn out 800 hp and 538 ft lbs of torque. According to Pagani, the four-wheeler can rocket from zero to 60 in just 2.7 seconds and hit 215 mph at full tilt. It goes without saying, the Revolución is a track-only toy.
At 2.9 pounds per horsepower, traction control is somewhat essential. As such, Pagani equipped the Revolución with a Bosch-based TC system featuring 12 different settings. This works in tandem with a “renewed” ABS system that utilizes Brembo’s lighter and stiffer Formula 1–derived carbon-ceramic brakes.

The luxe interior features swathes of carbon fiber and blue accents. 

To top it off, the Revolución is jam-packed with splitters and spoilers along with a vertical rear stabilizer. To further improve handling, the rear wing features an F1-like Drag Reduction System (DRS) that can be manually operated at speeds above 62 mph.
While BH Auction is yet to share details regarding the sale or give an estimate for the rare ride, collectors should be prepared for both a bidding war and sky-high hammer price. The Revolución had an original sticker price of $2.9 million and Zondas can easily attract up to $5 million at auction. Hey, that’s the price you pay for a truly revolutionary ride.

Check out more photos of the car below:

This One-of-a-Kind Pagani Hurayra Roadster BC Is the Most Otherworldly Car You’ll See Today

This One-of-a-Kind Pagani Hurayra Roadster BC Is the Most Otherworldly Car You’ll See Today

According to Merriam-Webster, a supernova is the explosion of a star. It’s now also a multimillion-dollar hypercar thanks to Pagani. The Italian marque has just unveiled a shiny new Huayra Roadster BC named after the stellar phenomenon, and it appears to be almost as powerful and luminous.

The one-of-a-kind four-wheeler was commissioned by a wealthy Canadian collector, Olivier Benlouou of OB Prestige Auto, who worked directly with the automaker’s CEO Horacio Pagani to create Supernova. The dream machine was recently delivered to Pfaff Pagani of Toronto, who also assisted with the project. The stunner sports exposed carbon fiber finished in Oro Rosa (Italian for “rose gold”) paint. The centerpiece is the V-style front hood split that showcases the rose gold carbon and classic carbon weave.

The gleaming exterior is enhanced by gold glitter accents that adorn the convertible’s curves—just like stars in the night sky. If that’s not quite enough glitz, the exotic ride also features Bronzo Chiaro wheels with the same diamond sparkle, along with red calipers.

“This wasn’t the original configuration,” Chris Green, the general manager of the Toronto dealership, told Robb Report via email. “It was a last-minute change and we’re really glad Olivier decided to make the bold move.”

The car’s exposed carbon-fiber monocoque can be spotted inside. 

Pfaff Pagani of Toronto

The interior is comparably understated yet still exudes Pagani’s signature sense of luxury. It features a subtle combination of cream leather and a custom tartan on the seats, along with black Alcantara on the dash and gold cluster dials. But the pièce de résistance is surely the gearstick, which was crafted from milled layered carbon and balsa wood.
Under the hood, there was no need to mess with perfection. As standard, the Huayra packs one of AMG’s twin-turbocharged 6.0-liter V-12 that’s capable of delivering a beastly 800 hp and 774 ft lbs of torque. This gives the speedster, which ordinarily tips the scales at 2,755 pounds, the ability to soar from zero to 60 mph in roughly 3.5 seconds and reach a top speed of more than 200 mph.

The seats see a combination of cream leather and custom tartan. 

Pfaff Pagani of Toronto

The Huayra Roadster BC, which made its debut in a racing game before appearing at the 2019 Monterey Car Week, will be limited to just 40 examples worldwide. This is currently the only model in the Great White North. Each car costs $3.5 million from the factory, making it one of the most expensive new rides on the roads. If you add to that painstaking customization, you can imagine the final price of Supernova would’ve been nothing short of, well, astronomical.  But hey, that’s the price of stardom.

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