Mustang

A Rare, Restored 1965 Mustang Shelby GT350R Racecar With Just 9,000 Miles Is Up for Auction

A Rare, Restored 1965 Mustang Shelby GT350R Racecar With Just 9,000 Miles Is Up for Auction

Every so often, a rare pony car surfaces for collectors. Case in point: This 1965 Shelby GT350R that’s currently up for auction on Bring a Trailer.

The legendary “R” variant was the beefier successor to the street-going GT350 built to firm up Ford’s presence on the racetrack. In fact, the GT350R cemented its place in motorsports history with three straight SCCA National B-Production Championship wins in ‘65, ’66 and ’67.

This particular model, which is one of just 36 turnkey competition cars built by Shelby American in ‘65, has exceptional provenance and pedigree, which explains why it’s now heading toward seven-figure territory on BaT.

The mint-condition Mustang features its original racing livery. 

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Shortly after rolling off the line, Chassis 5R213 joined a 12-city tour to promote the marque’s racing achievements. In ‘66, the GT350R was one of a handful imported to Peru by gentleman drivers interested in partaking in rallies and endurance races. The four-wheeler returned stateside in ‘84, after which it underwent a major refurb. The car subsequently achieved a Triple Crown on the Shelby show circuit in 2017 and has appeared on numerous tours.
Today, the mint-condition Mustang features its original racing livery, with Wimbledon White with Guardsman Blue Le Mans stripes and side accents. It has a few distinctive features that prove it’s a competition model, too, including the fiberglass front apron with integrated brake-cooling intakes, flared fenders, a top-vented plexiglass rear window, pull-up plexiglass side windows and riveted aluminum sail panel block-off plates.
Inside, meanwhile, the racing-style interior sports a roll bar and fire extinguisher, along with black leather seats, a wood-rimmed steering wheel and period-correct gauges. The odometer shows 9,000 miles, with the true mileage unknown.

Inside, the car sports a wood-rimmed steering wheel and period-correct gauges. 

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Under the hood there’s a fresh Ford 289 ci V-8 engine with rebuilt cylinder heads and timing assemblies, a Holley four-barrel carburetor and a Cobra high-rise intake manifold. Power is sent through a close-ratio Borg-Warner T-10 four-speed manual transmission with an aluminum case. The original V-8 is also included in the sale.
With four days left on the online auction, the vintage ride is sitting at $775,000 at the time of this writing. Considering the first Shelby GT350R sold for $3.85 million in 2020 to become the most expensive Mustang of all time, the current price could jump further still.

Giddy up, bidders.
Check out more photos below:

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A Coveted 1968 Shelby Mustang GT500 ‘King of the Road’ Is Up for Auction

A Coveted 1968 Shelby Mustang GT500 ‘King of the Road’ Is Up for Auction

Of all the Ford Mustangs to roll off the assembly line since 1964, Carroll Shelby’s GT500 ranks among the rarest and most coveted. Rarer still is the “King of a Road,” a high-octane variant that took the beloved American muscle car to a whole new level. There are only 1,053 such fastback models in existence, and now one has just been listed for auction.

This particular pony, which is currently up for grabs on Bring a Trailer, was built at Ford’s New Jersey plant during a scant one-year production run in ‘68. The descriptor “KR” (for “King of the Road”) couldn’t be more apt, either, with the variant delivering way more grunt than the previous iterations of the early ‘60s.

Under the hood lies Ford’s hefty 428 cu Cobra Jet V-8 mated to a 3-speed automatic transmission. The mill was factory rated at 335 hp and 440 ft lbs of torque, though was known to produce more than 400 horses on occasion. This made the King of the Road one of the most powerful four-wheelers of the era.

The King of the Road is good for 335 hp and 440 ft lbs of torque. 

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In addition, the Mustang is equipped with the GT500’s upgraded suspension with an anti-roll bar, front coil springs and rear leaf springs. It also features power steering, power-assisted front disc brakes and 15-inch alloy wheels wrapped in Goodyear Regatta Touring tires.
The car’s noir hue is another highlight. This example is finished in Raven Black with white side stripes and the GT500KR name. It’s one of only 38 examples to combine this transmission and paint scheme. The car was also treated to a full refurb in 2009 to ensure tip-top condition.

The cabin sports black vinyl with woodgrain trim. 

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Inside, the Interior Décor Group package sees a black vinyl accented handsomely with woodgrain trim. You can also expect bucket seats, a woodgrain steering wheel with a Shelby centerpiece and vintage gauges.
With a mere 67,000 miles on the odometer, the retro ride is currently sitting at $105,00 at the time of writing, with another three days left on the sale. All hail the King.
Check out more photos below:

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Bring a Trailer

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Bring a Trailer

Lego’s New Take on the Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 Is Powered by a Pair of Pull-Back Motors

Lego’s New Take on the Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 Is Powered by a Pair of Pull-Back Motors

The centerpiece of any Mustang is the engine. As it turns out, this is just as true when the pony car takes model form.

Lego has just unveiled a detailed new model of the Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 featuring a working mill under the hood. The two pull-back motors propel the miniature pony forward like a real-life muscle car. On top of that, the model can be used with Lego’s AR app, which allows you to put it to the test on a virtual racetrack.

Racing prowess aside, the mini Mustang isn’t bad to look at, either. Comprising some 544 pieces, it features the same sleek lines and boxy silhouette as the original. Spanning 10.5 inches from tip to tail, it has been finished in a bright green hue and sports twin racing stripes in white on the body. The model also comes with a rear cover that keeps it nice and stable if you’d rather display it than play with it.

The Mustang model comprises some 544 pieces. 

Lego

It is, of course, difficult to best the actual ‘Stang when it comes to power and panache. In fact, Carroll Shelby famously said the original Shelby GT500 was the first car he was “really proud of.” The newest model, which was unveiled in November last year, will be the mightiest Mustang to date and the most powerful street-legal car Ford has ever built. The supercharged 5.2-liter V-8, which is aptly called the Predator, can reportedly deliver a staggering 760 horses and 625 ft lbs of torque for blistering speed.
Lego’s model may not pack the grunt of the original, but anyone aged nine or over can build it themselves. That’s something that you certainly can’t say about a Ford. It’s cheaper and more readily available than the real four-wheeler, too, with a price tag of just $61. The limited-edition 2022 Shelby GT500, meanwhile, starts at $72,900. Still, we know which we’d prefer.
Check out more photos below:

Lego

Lego

Lego

Car of the Week: The ‘Flying Mustang’ Driven by Ken Miles Will Land at Auction (Again)

Car of the Week: The ‘Flying Mustang’ Driven by Ken Miles Will Land at Auction (Again)

The story of how Carroll Shelby was enlisted to turn Ford’s quotidian Mustang into a race car has been hashed and rehashed, embellished with sprigs of editorial parsley and, ultimately, served on a silver platter ever since the first Ford Shelby GT350 rolled out of Shelby’s shop in Venice, Calif, circa January of 1965. It’s generally agreed that only 562 examples of the 1965 model-year cars were made, making it the most desirable of all Shelby Mustangs and a top-tier collectible.

But as I’ve more than once alluded, apropos of the denizens in George Orwell’s book Animal Farm, some cars are more “equal” than others. Among Shelbys, those would be examples of the 1965 GT350R model, of which 34 production cars were built specifically for racing, as designated by the “R” in their VIN. The rest of the cars have an “S”—for street—stamped into the tiny aluminum plate riveted onto the top of the driver’s-side inner fender.

One of two 1965 Shelby GT350R prototypes, 5R002 will be offered through Mecum Auctions on January 15. 

Photo: Courtesy of Mecum Auctions.

To understand how one littler letter can affect value by six-figures or more is to grasp the sheer lunacy of our hobby. (Ask anyone deep into baseball cards if you want a more in-depth insight into the psyche that drives collectors to the brink.)
The only thing more rare in the model line than the 34 examples of the R production variant would be two prototypes; 5R001 and 5R002. One of them, 5R002, took more than 10 first-place finishes at the SCCA’s championship series in 1965—including the first win by a Shelby Mustang—adding indisputable allure, especially now that it will be crossing the block at the Mecum Auctions event in Kissimmee, Fla., on January 15.
“As one of the most decorated Mustangs in automotive history, this Shelby Mustang GT350R prototype upholds an important reputation for carmakers, engineers and fans alike,” says Aaron Shelby, grandson of Carroll Shelby. “Its innovative design, timeless aesthetic and history of high performance make this vehicle a marvel, shaping the future of car making and racing.”

This vehicle took more than 10 first-place finishes at the SCCA’s championship series in 1965. 

Photo: Courtesy of Mecum Auctions.

The provenance of this car is enhanced by the many racing legends who drove it, foremost of whom was Ken Miles, who handily won the B Production races at Green Valley Raceway. Miles’ persona and legacy were dutifully acknowledged (but embellished as only Hollywood can) in the 2019 film Ford v Ferrari. The history of 5R002 is well documented, as any reader of Car and Driver in 1966 would likely remember, which featured the Shelby Mustang airborne on its cover, after which it was called the “Flying Mustang.”

Old race cars rarely die, they only occasionally get lost in the interim between their glory days and the present. Since its retirement from motorsport, this prototype has had a number of notable owners, between which it was essentially lost and later rediscovered in Mexico in 1989.

Ken Miles catching air with the Shelby GT350R prototype in period. 

Photo: Courtesy of Mecum Auctions.

Following the discovery, it was prominently displayed at the Shelby American Museum in Boulder, Colo., for 14 years. John Atzbach, a collector who acquired the vehicle in 2010, undertook a full restoration spanning four years, returning the car to its original specification from 1965. Subsequently, 5R002 has appeared at the 2015 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it won Best in Class, and the 2016 North American International Auto Show.

An interior rich with motorsport provenance. 

Photo: Courtesy of Mecum Auctions.

They aren’t making them like Ol’ Shel’ anymore, and they certainly aren’t making cars like his 1965 GT350R. Shelby market watchers will recall that this car hammered at $3.5 million ($3.85 million including buyer’s commission) when it was auctioned by Mecum in July 2020, and remarkably, it’s on the ramp again looking for a new owner. Whether raising a paddle or looking through the window, collectors and enthusiasts alike will not want to miss this sale as new Shelby history continues to be made.

Car of the Week: The Kendall Custom Restomod Was Built to Save Children’s Lives

Car of the Week: The Kendall Custom Restomod Was Built to Save Children’s Lives

Ever since the movie Gone in 60 Seconds presented Eleanor as its star car, restomod Mustang fastbacks have dominated the imaginations of both custom builders and Mustang lovers who appreciate the combination of classic style and modern American muscle. And let’s face it, there are few cars more evocative of speed, swagger and sheer seductive appeal than a long, low fastback ‘Stang with a fire-breathing Ford crate engine and modern underpinnings.

Now, Kendall Motor Oil has written the check to build a one-of-a-kind Mustang restomod called, appropriately, The Kendall Custom, inspired by Carroll Shelby’s 1967 Shelby GT500 and featuring the components and handiwork of more than 20 standouts in the automotive industry. To be sold by Mecum Auctions on January 15 in Kissimmee, Fla., this one-off is special for more than just its unique build. All of the proceeds from the sale of the car will go to Curing Kids Cancer, a nonprofit organization founded by Grainne and Clay Owen in 2005, two years after their son Killian passed away from leukemia at the age of nine.

“It takes approximately $25,000 to help a child receive a lifesaving treatment that’s been developed for leukemia and other cancers,” says Grainne Owen, the organization’s co-founder and president. “We anticipate the proceeds from the car sale to potentially help save the lives of multiple children, and that’s truly amazing.”

A one-of-a-kind build, the 1,080 hp Kendall Custom will be offered through Mecum Auctions on January 15 to benefit Curing Kids Cancer, a nonprofit philanthropy. 

Photo: Courtesy of Mecum Auctions.

While that’s reason enough to keep bidding on the boil, there’s also the 1,080 hp, 5.0-liter twin-turbocharged Ford “Coyote” V-8 engine by Garrett Advancing Motion. That monster mill, shifted by a Ford six-speed automatic transmission hooked up to a Strange Engineering 9-inch differential, is stuffed into Dynacorn Classic Bodies’ exact replica of a 1967 Mustang fastback shell. Dynacorn is a manufacturer familiar to anyone who has ever fantasized about a ground-up restomod build. In this case, the vehicle’s overall construction is the handiwork of Thompson Street Customs (TSC) in Denver, Colo., who masterminded the project. The Roadster Shop’s Fast Track chassis is a work of metallurgical art, while exterior and interior billet pieces accent the brilliant Kendall Red paintwork custom-mixed and painted by TSC. And Baer disc brakes hide behind Custom TSC-designed wheels, while Pirelli rubber fill out the corners.

Inside is where the action is, and it’s a whole lot more luxurious than any GT500 Ol’ Shel ever made. While the interior tips a hat to the styling cues of the original 1967 Mustang, it takes the concept to a new level of extreme. Created by Eddie’s Rods and Customs of Pueblo, Colo., the cabin is trimmed in black leather and suede, accented with red stitching and red Dakota Digital gauges, along with lots of machined and polished billet aluminum from Lokar Performance Products. Vintage Air keeps things ice cold, while a Kenwood custom sound system with JL Audio amps and speakers plays backup to the main act: twin Garrett turbos spooling up more than a thousand horses.

Interior embellishments include black leather and suede with red contrast stitching, red Dakota Digital gauges and lots of machined and polished billet aluminum. 

Photo: Courtesy of Mecum Auctions.

Anyone who has built or commissioned a restomod of this caliber understands the commitment of time and resources (read that as dollars) required to achieve a concours-level result. This car has it, and knowing that the price paid by the top bidder goes to a higher purpose makes putting pedal (or paddle) to the metal seem all the more worthwhile.

Shelby Is Resurrecting the Ford Mustang GT500KR as a 900 HP Beast

Shelby Is Resurrecting the Ford Mustang GT500KR as a 900 HP Beast

Shelby American knows how to celebrate a milestone birthday the right way.

The high-performance shop announced that it will mark its 60th anniversary by reviving one of its most legendary models, the Ford Mustang GT500KR. And because this is Shelby we’re talking about, production will be limited to just 180 examples, with an additional 45 earmarked for foreign markets.

This will be the third Mustang GT500KR that Shelby has released. Nicknamed the King of the Road—hence the KR at the end of its name—the powerful variant made its debut in 1968. It was then brought back four decades later in 2008. The latest version will be a lot more exclusive than the first two, according to Car and Driver. Ford and Shelby built 1,570 examples of the first-generation GT500KR and 1,712 units of the second.

Shelby American Ford Mustang GT500KR 

Shelby American

The latest GT500KR won’t just be rarer than its predecessors; it’s got a lot more grunt. The muscle car is powered by an upgraded 5.2-liter V-8 that’ll spit out over 900 horses when using 93 octane gas or above, according to a press release. That’s a boost of over 120 hp compared to the regular GT500, which can be attributed to a massive 3.8-liter Shelby by Whipple supercharger with a high-volume intercooler and heat exchanger, according to the shop. Other modifications include a Shelby by Borla exhaust system, MagneRide suspension recalibration and Ford Performance front and rear sway bars.
The new King of the Road also looks quite a bit sportier than the regular GT500. It’s got a carbon-fiber sculpted hood, front splitter and rear diffuser. It has Shelby rocker stripes, special badging and rides on a set of one-piece 6061-T6 forged aluminum wrapped in performance-spec tires. Inside, you’ll find leather seating, a numbered dash plate and more special badging.
If you’re lucky enough to snag one of the new GT500KR build slots, you’ll actually be able to choose between one of three model years: 2020, 2021 and 2022. Shelby says it will make 60 variants for each year, all of which will start at $127,895. And don’t worry if you already own a GT500 from one of these years—you can always upgrade. Sixty special KR packages are available for $54,995.
Production of the third-generation King of the Road is set to begin early next year. The first example will also go up for auction at Barrett-Jackson’s Scottsdale auction on January 29, with all proceeds going to charity. Getting an extreme ‘Stang while helping out a good cause doesn’t sound like a bad way to get the new year started.

Check out more photos of the Mustang GT500KR below:

Shelby American

Shelby American

Shelby American

Shelby American

Shelby American

The Ford Mustang Mach-E: Everything We Know About the Spunky All-Electric SUV

The Ford Mustang Mach-E: Everything We Know About the Spunky All-Electric SUV

Overview
It was only a matter of time until Ford released its first fully electric vehicle. And what better way for the Detroit automaker to join the electric revolution than by slapping its most famous nameplate, Mustang, on an EV? Less expected, though, is the form it has taken. Despite its renowned moniker, the Mustang Mach-E isn’t a battery-powered muscle car. Instead, it’s crossover SUV—complete with four doors and room for the entire family in back—that was merely inspired by the 56-year-old pony.

Needless to say, this has kicked up some controversy among the Mustang faithful. Auto purists are rarely welcoming of change, especially when someone wants to chuck out their beloved internal combustion engines, but the newest Mustang is really like no other before it. Sure, it’s got the familiar emblem at the center of its grille and few of the same curves, but that’s basically it. At least superficially. There is one important quality the Mach-E shares with its gas-powered predecessors that some are missing: This is a true, high-performance vehicle—just one with zero emissions.

2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E 

Yeah, it may not look as cool as the ’65 Fastback, and its all-electric power train will never roar like a Shelby-tuned mill, but the Mustang Mach-E is a car for those of us who want to actually enjoy our time out on the road without the carbon footprint that usually comes with it. And really, what better way to carry on the innovative Mustang legacy than that?
Engine, Power and Performance
Few American cars are more associated with performance than the Mustang. In fact, one of the sensations most associated with the iconic sports car is the roar of its gas-powered engine. That’s something the Mach-E won’t be able to deliver, because lurking under its hood is Ford’s first all-electric—and relatively silent—power train.
You won’t be selecting between a V-6 or a V-8, but there will still be choices to make. There are two power trains available for the Mach-E: a rear-wheel-drive (RWD) version that features one motor on the rear axle and an all-wheel-drive (AWD) option that has a motor on both axles. Whichever edition you choose, you’ll also be able to pick between two battery pack offerings: the standard-range 75.7 kwh pack or an extended-range 98.8 kwh pack. The larger battery pack will give the power train a bit more oomph and increase the driving range of your EV (more on that below).

2021 Mustang Mach-E GT 

Eric Perry

While the Mach-E isn’t powered by a massive V-8 like its predecessors, it still packs some punch. Both the RWD and AWD models generate 266 hp—when connected to the standard-range battery—and between 317 ft lbs and 428 ft lbs of torque, respectively. Spring for the extended-range battery and output increases to 290 hp for the RWD model and 346 hp for the AWD configuration (torque figures remain the same). That’s plenty of zip, but if you want even more grunt, the AWD GT and GT Performance Edition variants, both of which only come with the extended-range battery, run with 480 horses and between 600 and 634 ft lbs of twist.
First-Drive Impressions
Robb Report got to take the fresh-off-the-line Mach-E for a spin in January. What we found was a vehicle that fell just shy of premium electric crossovers from Audi and Jaguar but was basically the next best thing. While whipping around the canyon roads above Malibu, writer Laura Burstein found the AWD Mach-E to be “stable and fun” despite the added weight of its extra-large battery pack. The RWD setup proved itself to be surprisingly nimble during an autocross course set up by Ford, and it was even possible to make the vehicle’s tires squeal. No, it’s not an electric muscle car, but, as Burstein wrote, the automaker’s “engineers did a remarkable job making it come close.” Her advice? Wait for the GT Performance Edition and its ability to cover zero to 60 mph in 3.5 seconds.
Range and Charging
EV performance is about more than just brute strength, of course. That’s why Ford promised to deliver one of the longest-range EVs on the market when it first announced the Mach-E in November 2019. The marque even went as far as to set a range target of 300 miles, something no one but Tesla had accomplished at that point.
Sure enough, the brand was able to make good on this guarantee (after some initial doubt about whether it could). Last fall, the RWD Mach-E became only the fifth vehicle to receive an EPA-certified range of 300 miles or more. Things have gotten even better since thanks to the introduction of the long-range California Route 1 edition. The 2022 RWD version of the the latter has a targeted range of 305 miles, while the AWD with the extended-battery has an estimated range of 306 miles, according to the automaker.

Of course, that 306-mile target is at the top of the spectrum. With the standard battery pack, the RWD has a range of 230 miles and the AWD of 211 miles. Neither of those numbers are anything to write home about, but it’s important to remember that they’re for entry-level models. The Mach-E’s high-performance iterations, the GT and GT Performance Edition, tout ranges of 270 and 260 miles, respectively, which should be plenty for a day out on the road or track.
When you do need to replenish the Mach-E’s energy stores, it should be pretty quick. Every model in the lineup offers fast-charging capabilities, so you’ll be able to go from 10 percent to 80 percent battery capacity in about 40 minutes. And, thanks to the included mobile charger, you can add roughly 30 miles overnight when connected to a standard 120-volt outlet. That’s not a lot, of course, so you might want to spring for a Ford Connected Charging Station for the home. It can add those 30 miles in an hour and fully recharge the EV in 11 hours.
Exterior and Design
Prior to the Mach-E’s arrival, it might have been hard to imagine the Mustang as an SUV. But Ford’s design team has actually done an impressive job turning a vehicle that has come to define the American muscle car into an electric crossover. It’s not likely to win any auto design contests, but the SUV’s extended hood, sloping roofline and raised rear haunch will appear familiar to anyone who’s spent time looking at the conventional Mustang since the launch of its fourth generation in 1994.
The fact that the Mach-E borrows design language from the “real” Mustang may irk some purists, but it helps the car stand out. That’s no small feat in the early days of the electric era when many EVs tend to look like Tesla knockoffs.

Inside the Mustang Mach-E 

Interior, Space and Cargo
Unlike the exterior, which bears a number of Mustang trademarks, the Mach-E’s interior is basically all new. It features a streamlined dashboard with a digital instrument gauge tucked into the driver’s cockpit and a large 15.5-inch touchscreen infotainment system perched atop the center console. The high-tech presentation gives the cabin a distinctly modern look and feel. The biggest difference, though, is the interior space. The traditional Mustang features a 2+2 seating layout, with two seats in the front and two smaller seats in the rear. (Anyone who’s sat in the muscle car can confirm that it’s not exactly roomy back there.) That couldn’t be further from the case with the Mach-E. The second row has three full-sized seats. There’s also plenty of cargo room, with 29.7 cubic-feet behind the back seat (which increases to 59.7 cubic feet if you fold down the back row).

Infotainment and Connectivity
The Mach-E’s 15.5-inch touchscreen provides access to Ford’s robust new SYNC 4 infotainment system. Featuring three dedicated driver profiles, along with one guest slot, the system uses machine learning to adapt to you, so that no adjustments need to be made once in the driver’s seat. This means that when you turn on the EV, ambient lighting will already be set to your liking, the climate controls will be to your preference (for both the front and back row) and your favorite radio station or podcast will be playing from the Bang & Olufsen sound system. You can also use it to select one of three Drive Experiences: Whisper, a calm mode that offers gradual acceleration and braking; Engage, which allows you to quickly change speed and has a louder in-vehicle soundtrack to match; and Unbridled, a performance mode that features increased throttle response to help recreate the feel of shifting between gears on the road.
Pricing: Plenty of Bang for the Buck 
Electric technology isn’t cheap, and thus far EVs have generally commanded higher prices than their internal-combustion counterparts.  Despite this, the Mustang Mach-E is quite accessibly priced by both gas and electric vehicle standards. In fact, Ford’s EV sits squarely in the middle of the price range for the traditional Mustang, which starts at $27,205 (the EcoBoost Fastback) but can cost more than $72,900 (Shelby GT500). Pricing for the Mach-E starts at $42,895 for the Select trim, $48,100 for the Premium, $50,775 for the California Route 1 Edition, $59,995 for the GT and $64,900 for the GT Performance Edition. Each Mach-E qualifies for as much as a $7,500 EV tax credit, so you might end up spending even less.

Which Mustang Mach-E Is Best for You?
There’s no American car, with perhaps the exception of the Corvette, more associated with variants than the Mustang. Ford has always made sure to offer drivers a spectrum of performance and power across a range of ‘Stangs, and it doesn’t look like things will be any different with the Mach-E.

Don’t hold your breath waiting for Shelby’s take on the Mach-E, but anyone interested in the crossover has four different trim levels to choose from. Up first is the entry-level Select, which is available as either a RWD or AWD model but, notably, only comes with the standard-sized battery back. The Premium, meanwhile, can be purchased with either the standard or extended battery pack for more range and power. Then there’s the deluxe California Route 1 Edition, which is named after the Golden State’s famous coastal highway and is the longest-range variant at 305 or 306 miles per charge, depending on whether you choose RWD or AWD. Finally, there are the brawny GT and GT Performance Editions, which both sacrifice some range (about 10 to 15 percent) for a lot more output (420 hp) and torque (as much as 630 ft lbs). The last two are the clearest sign that Ford hasn’t forgotten the Mustang’s roots, even if it has dug into a completely different power plant.

More stories about the Mach-E from Robb Report:

This Gorgeous Mustang Is Based on Steve McQueen’s Car in ‘Bullitt.’ Now It’s Heading to Auction.

This Gorgeous Mustang Is Based on Steve McQueen’s Car in ‘Bullitt.’ Now It’s Heading to Auction.

Collectors looking to channel the King of Cool have just been gifted a golden opportunity. A limited-edition Ford Mustang based on the exact one Steve McQueen drove in the ‘68 classic Bullitt will soon go under the gavel at Monterey Car Week.

The commemorative pony was released back in 2019 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the beloved ‘60s thriller. In one of the most memorable scenes, the Hollywood legend drove a Highland Green 1968 Ford Mustang GT Fastback through the streets of San Francisco in an exhilarating high-speed car chase. The lean, green muscle machine pretty much stole the show, and its modern-day successor is no slouch, either. 

Under the hood, the Bullitt packs a 5.8-liter V-8 mated to a six-speed manual transmission and can churn out 480 hp for a top speed of 163 mph. In case that’s not enough grunt for you, the car is also equipped with a Gen 5 Whipple supercharger system that can produce more than 775 hp, along with an array of performance upgrades.

The Bullitt packs a 5.8-liter V-8 plus supercharger and can churn out more than 775 hp. 

Russo and Steele

Needless to say, this thing can run. In fact, Robb Report put the Bullitt through its paces two years ago on the roads surrounding the Bay Area. Although there were no jumps over the hills of downtown San Francisco, the four-wheeler’s nimble handling and impressive performance still provided its share of thrills. 
As for aesthetics, the Bullitt sports the same green hue as the original, though it has a sleeker, more sculpted exterior. The interior has been updated, too, with a modern infotainment system and electronics package that includes a touchscreen, a Bang & Olufsen audio system, navigation, blind-spot monitors and a memory function for the driver’s Recaro seat. It’s a far cry from the predecessor’s vintage analog gauges and dials. 

The Bullitt’s interior is decidedly more modern than the original. 

Russo and Steele

The Bullitt will lead Russo and Steele’s collector car auction, taking place August 12-13. The auction house hasn’t given an estimate, but the starting price for the new Bullitt was $47,595 back in 2019. 
“This commemorative Mustang is perfect for car enthusiasts seeking the thrill McQueen felt as he sped around San Francisco in the classic Bullitt movie,” Drew Alcazar, auction president and CEO, said in a statement.
Best start planning your trip to San Fran now.
Check out the photos below:

Russo and Steele

Russo and Steele

Russo and Steele

Russo and Steele

Racing Legend Parnelli Jones’s Personal Ford Mustang Saleen Is Heading to Auction

Racing Legend Parnelli Jones’s Personal Ford Mustang Saleen Is Heading to Auction

With a history that dates back nearly six decades, there have been dozens of special Ford Mustangs. Still, few of those were built to honor an American racing legend.

Next week, a 2007 Ford Mustang Saleen Parnelli Jones that belonged to the celebrated race car driver himself is scheduled to hit the block at Mecum Auctions’ Indy 2021 sales event. The first of only 500 examples, the striking speed machine remains in pristine condition and will likely fetch big money because of that.

Parnelli Jones’s personal 2007 Ford Mustang Saleen Parnelli Jones 

Mecum Auctions

Jones is unquestionably one of US motor racing’s true legends. In addition to having one of the sport’s most memorable names, he’s won at nearly every level as a driver and team owner, whether it was in an open-wheel racer, stock car or off-roader. His success on the track has earned induction into over 20 different racing halls of fame, including the International Motorsports Hall of Fame and the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America.

Despite having an Indy 500 win to this name, Jones is most closely associated with the Bud Moore Boss 302 Mustang he drove during his dominant 1970 SCCA Trans American Sedan Championship season. And it’s this car that was the inspiration for Saleen’s limited-edition 2007 ‘Stang. Like Jones’s original, chassis no. 001 features a bold orange paint job, offset by a matte black racing strip and matching decals. The same color scheme carries over to the interior, though the dashboard, steering wheel and center console have all been done up in classic black and silver. The dash also features the signatures of both Jones and Steve Saleen.

Inside the Mustang Saleen Parnelli Jones 

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In addition to its special paint job and interior package, the modern-day muscle car is powered by a mammoth 5.0-liter V-8 with forged internals, according to Motor1.com. The specially tuned mill produces a maximum of 400 horsepower and 390 ft lbs of torque, all of which is sent to the rear axle via a five-speed manual transmission. Jones’s original Boss 302 was a beast, but this street-legal version is even more powerful. It also has only 6,520 miles on odometer, meaning it remains in great shape 14 years after rolling off the line.

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Jones’s Mustang Saleen is scheduled to go up for bid on Saturday, May 15, according to the auction house’s website. No estimate has been given, but considering who it belonged to, and the condition it’s in, we expect it’ll fetch top dollar. Definitely far more than its original $61,565 sticker price.

The Ford Mustang Mach-E Just Got Two New 480 HP GT Variants

The Ford Mustang Mach-E Just Got Two New 480 HP GT Variants

The Ford Mustang Mach-E may be battery-powered, but that’s not stopping it from getting its very own GT variants.

The Detroit automaker kicked off the new week by unveiling two high-performance versions of its first EV—the GT and GT Performance Edition. Set to arrive this fall, both of the electric ‘Stangs will offers a gutsy 480 hp and a special track-focused driving mode.

2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E GT 

Ford

Right now, the most powerful Mach-E you can buy is the all-wheel-drive Extended Range variant. That version—which is powered by two motors, one on each axle—produces a very respectable 346 hp and 428 ft lbs of torque. The GT and GT Performance Edition both feature a slightly bigger front motor that boosts your output by about 134 horses. On the torque front, the GT yields 600 ft lbs of twist, while the GT Performance Edition offers 643 ft lbs. You should be able to feel the difference, too, as the GT can sprint from zero to 60 mph in 3.8 seconds, while the GT Performance Edition can do the same in 3.5 seconds.

There’s a trade-off for the added oomph, though. Both variants feature an 88.0-kWh battery pack, but the GT’s driving range is just 250 miles, while the GT Performance Edition can only go 235 miles on a single charge. Neither of those figures should be deal breakers, but they fall well short of the 300- and 305-mile ranges offered by the rear-wheel-drive Extended Range and the California Route 1 edition. Of course, the range figures for both GTs are just estimates, so well have to see how they fare in EPA testing.

Ford

Complementing the more powerful two-motor setup on both GTS is a new driving mode called Unbridled Extend. Designed specifically for race tracks and other closed courses, the mode balances power and consistency, allowing you to put up better lap times. Other sporty additions include a MagneRide Damping System that smooths out handling and red Brembo brake calipers.
The GTs don’t look that different from previous Mach-Es except for an illuminated Pony badge. Other subtle tweaks include special badging, 20-inch machined-face aluminum wheels and two new color options—Cyber Orange and Grabber Blue, which was previously only available on the Mach-E First Edition. Inside the EV you’ll find Ford Performance front seats, special stitching (copper for the GT, metallic for the GT Performance Edition), an aluminum instrument panel and a booming Bang & Olufsen sound system.

Ford

Prepare to spend more for the more powerful Mach-Es, which are available for pre-order starting Wednesday. While the regular Mach-E starts at $44,995, the GT will start at $61,000 and the GT Performance Edition at $66,000. Considering that those higher sticker prices get the EV closer to the muscle car performance the nameplate is famous for, we’re guess most enthusiasts won’t mind too much.

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