Mous Lamrabat

Vibrant and Inspired By Music, Okhtein FW21 is Giving Us a Major Mood-Boost

Vibrant and Inspired By Music, Okhtein FW21 is Giving Us a Major Mood-Boost

Photo: Mous Lamrabat/Courtesy of Okhtein
Fashion and music. A relationship that has spawned an abundance of mutual creativity continues to be nurtured by designers, whose memories, experiences, and ever-changing personal playlists inevitably intertwine and end up within the rails of their new season offerings. Far from background noise, a show’s soundtrack is integral to the delivery of a collection’s story and emotional resonance – if it wasn’t, Burberry wouldn’t have gone to the effort of establishing an entire platform (Burberry Acoustic) dedicated to spotlighting and nurturing young musical talent. For FW21, the significance of sound manifested in dance, with Hermès, Dior, and Kenzo all putting on performances whether through film or via models simply letting loose on the runway. And yes! What better time to crank up the volume and shake off the past 22 months of Covid-19 fatigue than with a joyful, soul-enriching score.
Photo: Mous Lamrabat/Courtesy of Okhtein
For Okhtein’s Egyptian designer duo, sisters Aya and Mounaz Abdelraouf, it is music, in fact, that informs their new collection: a capsule of top handle bags and clutches in leather and satin, trimmed with their signature brasswork. Aptly named Euphoric Reverie, this latest offering is their most vibrant to date, orchestrated in a pantone of lime green, electric blue, lilac and plum with riffs on American artist Wes Wilson’s swirling psychedelic rock show posters – works that have become a 1960s pop culture phenomenon.
Photo: Mous Lamrabat/Courtesy of Okhtein
Lensed by Moroccan photographer Mous Lamrabat, Okhtein’s accompanying campaign imagery shows model Ansar Elyacoubi traverse the foliage of Marrakech’s Anima Garden dressed in an eclectic wardrobe of silks, feathers and authentic headpieces. It’s the visual equivalent of music for the senses: a beautifully dizzying combination with nods to a myriad of cultures, coming together to heal, uplift and inspire.
Photo: Mous Lamrabat/Courtesy of Okhtein
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Photography & AD: Mous LamrabatStyle: Lisa LapauwHair and makeup: Karima MaruanProduction: Marie Juncker at ArtsphereModel: Ansar ElyacoubiShot on location at Anima Garden Marrakech

Your First Look at Okhtein’s Classic Handbags Revamped for the SS21 Collection

Your First Look at Okhtein’s Classic Handbags Revamped for the SS21 Collection

Photographed by Mous Lamrabat
Now more than ever, designers have been looking to the past for inspiration, in hopes of a more sustainable future. Egyptian sisters and designers behind Okhtein, Aya and Mounaz Abdelraouf are of the same mind, as they revisit previous collections for the spring/summer 2021 season.
Photographed by Mous Lamrabat
The all-too-familiar feeling of confinement, and longing to be outdoors experienced in 2020 motivated the Abdelraouf sisters to look to nature and outdoor living for this collection. Titled Re-connect, the SS21 collection sees the designers revisit their classic handbag styles, weaving in natural and sustainable elements with the aim of reconnecting with nature.
Photographed by Mous Lamrabat
“Working on this collection was truly an experience for us,” shared the designers with Vogue Arabia. “We very much enjoyed the curation process of each piece. By connecting with ourselves, we dated back to older collections and reworked them in a manner that was relatable to nature. This collection was created during isolation, the time when the world stood still, and we were able to properly self-reflect.”
Photo: Courtesy of Okhtein
Featuring earthy tones, organic structures, and irregular shapes, the handbags are adorned with handmade and sustainable details including Spanish and Indian raffia. However, the collection stays true to the sisters’ design signature with sharp gold accents that are unmistakably Okhtein. A standout piece is the Terra bag. Handcrafted by artisans in India, it will be available in three customized print designs inspired by microscopic images of the human body. The theme of the collection is also reflected in the new Okhtein logo which features metallic rods that although distanced, are still connected to each other.
Photographed by Mous Lamrabat
To drive home the feeling of escapism and focus on nature, the handbags were photographed outdoors in the campaign lensed by Moroccan photographer Mous Lamrabat. Amongst mountains, model Athiec Chol Malel is photographed in Byzantine-inspired gowns as the sisters pay homage to their Egyptian heritage, drawing references from the period of arts and culture.
Photographed by Mous Lamrabat
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Inside Our Fourth Anniversary Issue Celebrating Arabia’s Creative Visionaries

Inside Our Fourth Anniversary Issue Celebrating Arabia’s Creative Visionaries

Athiec Geng for Vogue Arabia’s fourth anniversary issue photographed by Mous Lamrabat

This March, all 27 editions of Vogue worldwide are dedicating their issues to creativity and fashion’s artistic spirit. For Vogue Arabia, celebrating in this month its 4th anniversary, the theme takes a truly local angle, with an issue fully dedicated to the best creative talents coming from the Middle East and North Africa.
The conceptual covers are shot by Moroccan photographer Mous Lamrabat. They offer a message of optimism in a world that is facing so many challenges. Shot in Marrakech, the images by Lamrabat invite the viewer inside his singular universe; one that challenges modern misconceptions of beauty, and explores creativity within the world of the absurd and the surreal. With an often lighthearted undertone to his work, Lamrabat showcases an element of simplicity that portrays a real image of the region, telling journalist Myrna Ayad, “I want to show you where I’m from, not the way it’s shown in brochures.” The creative admits to being a bit of a hoarder – not only of props, but also ideas. For one of the cover images, he stacked an assembly of red fez hats first seen on the wall of a Marrakech riad atop the model’s head, before attaching a large red silk heart on her torso from a stash of props bought from Antwerp.
Farrah El Dibany photographed by Sherif Mokhtar

“At a time when the world is experiencing so many challenges, the joys of witnessing the genius of a fashion designer, artist, chef, or a performer, can drive us, more than ever, to a place of bliss, even if for a brief instant,” says Manuel Arnaut, Vogue Arabia editor-in-chief. “It is regrettable that historically, the work of creatives has been undervalued on so many occasions. I cannot help but think of my colleagues in the creative fields as unsung heroes, so many times working under harsh conditions, but bringing beauty, depth, and color to the world we live in.”
Schiaparelli spring 2021 couture. Photographed by Julien Vallon

By shining a spotlight on talent from a cross-section in the Middle East that has shaped fashion, arts, and design, the March issue brings to life the thriving and dynamic community in the region and showcases Vogue Arabia’s mission to support them. Some of the creatives included are Alia Bin Omair, Mahira Abdelaziz, and Yasmine Yeya, along with Rym Saidi and Zeinab Alhashemi.
The March anniversary issue also highlights a range of topics surrounding art and what creativity means today. From personal and powerful photo essays of a new generation of fearless young MENA talent shot in New York by Tunisian female photographer Oumayma Ben Tanfous, to a peek behind-the-scenes at surrealist fashion house Schiaparelli with an interview with its creative director Daniel Roseberry, this issue celebrates creativity in all its forms. Of course, March also showcases the latest high jewelry, SS21 collections, and the new abaya styles.
Shanina Shaik and Hilary Rhoda photographed by Greg Swales

In beauty, the SS21 trend report spotlights the most striking runway looks and how to achieve them, and makeup artist Niki M’nray pays tribute to iconic Middle Eastern female artists—from Safeya Binzagr to Monir Shahroudy—with an inventive interpretation of their work on models Shanina Shaik and Hilary Rhoda. In another striking tribute, celebrity hairstylist Nabil Harlow reimagines the decadence of the 1940s and 50s with his celebration of the golden age of Egyptian cinema. The issue also features Mohamed Abdelhamid, one of Egypt’s most successful SFX makeup artists—the favorite of stars such as Samia Gamal, Asmahan, Dalida—about some of the Arab world’s most important hair and makeup talents.
Photography: The Bardos

Creativity also comes with a twist of humor in this issue, spotlighting the famous Egyptian satirical figure Abla Fahita, who will star in the upcoming Netflix series Drama Queen, with her own couture created by some of the Arab world’s most exciting designers who created looks just for this shoot. March 8 is also when International Women’s Day is commemorated, and in this issue inspiring women from the region share their wisdom and insights. HE Ahood Al Zaabi, director of the United Nations Department at the UAE’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, writes exclusively for Vogue Arabia about gender equality and how the role of women in society must be reassessed, while Arwa Damon, senior international correspondent at CNN, speaks candidly about a topic all women will face at some point in their lives—menopause.
Designer Nora Al Shaikh and muse Lulwah Al-Homoud Photo: Taha Baageel

All this and more inspiring features, exclusive interviews, and groundbreaking fashion shoots, only in the March 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia.
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