Moschino

Jeremy Scott Steps Down as Creative Director at Moschino After a Decade

Jeremy Scott Steps Down as Creative Director at Moschino After a Decade

Photo: Acielle / Style Du Monde
After a decade steering Moschino, it’s been announced that Jeremy Scott will be exiting the role of creative director at the Aeffe-owned Italian brand. “These past 10 years at Moschino have been a wonderful celebration of creativity and imagination. I am so proud of the legacy I am leaving behind,” Scott said in a statement. “I would like to thank Massimo Ferretti for the honour of leading this iconic house. I would also like to thank all my fans around the world who celebrated me, my collections, and my vision, for without you none of this would be possible.”
Scott presented his first collection for the cheeky Franco Moschino-founded label during the autumn/winter 2014 season. “Scott’s embrace of consumer culture in the name of Moschino was bright, brash, and ingenious,” wrote Tim Blanks in Vogue Runway’s review of the collection, which mixed McDonald’s logos, cow prints, and even Spongebob Squarepants. Scott’s penchant for mixing high and low aesthetics resonated with many of the decade’s most iconic pop stars. Everyone from Lady Gaga to Cardi B to Lizzo found a kindred spirit in his irreverent take on culture and fashion. Who else but Scott could dress Katy Perry as a literal chandelier (and a hamburger for the after-party) to attend the “Notes on Camp”-themed Met Gala in 2019?
Backstage at Jeremy Scott’s first show for Moschino
In 10 years, Scott’s Moschino runways riffed on the subject of Barbie (a full decade before Barbie-core took over), paper dolls (a playful dig at the superficiality of the fashion business), cardboard (in an apparent critique of overconsumption), and money. The autumn/winter 2019 Price Is Right show will go down in runway history as one the funniest shows ever. He once even staged a show on a New York City subway at the MTA Transit Museum – complete with “Showtime” dancers.
His ability to remix the zeitgeist through Franco Moschino’s vision made the brand a viral success many times over – though not without the occasional misstep. A capsule collection released for spring/summer 2017 called “Just Say MoschiNO” was pill-themed, and many took offense to bags shaped like prescription pill bottles, given the opioid crisis sweeping the nation.
Moschino, fall 2019
During most of his tenure at Moschino, Scott was also producing his eponymous label, which suddenly stopped appearing on the fashion show schedule in 2019. Vogue Business’s Christina Binkley brought up its absence from the New York calendar in a recent interview with the designer. Scott hinted that his Moschino schedule kept him too busy. “I want to be sure I have a nice life – I mean, quality time with people,” he told Binkley. The brand’s hiatus may not be an indefinite one. “I own the company, so I can decide,” Scott said.
In a press release, Massimo Ferretti, Chairman of Aeffe S.p.A, which owns both Moschino and Jeremy Scott’s label, said: “I am fortunate to have had the opportunity of working with the creative force that is Jeremy Scott. I would like to thank him for his 10 years of commitment to Franco Moschino’s legacy and for ushering in a distinct and joyful vision that will forever be a part of Moschino history.”
Originally published in Vogue.com

Brands Hop Into Year of the Rabbit With Playful Products, Thoughtful Rituals

Brands Hop Into Year of the Rabbit With Playful Products, Thoughtful Rituals

SHANGHAI — As China gets ready for the first Chinese New Year holiday rush following the removal of COVID-19-related restrictions on Jan. 8, brands have released their Year of the Rabbit campaigns for the key gifting period.
With the country’s economy expected to experience a steady U-shape recovery and the luxury sector set to grow between 5 and 10 percent in 2023, brands are introducing Chinese New Year capsule collections with a wide range of product offerings and global retail releases as Chinese shoppers resume traveling.

According to the Ministry of Culture and Tourism, tourism revenue grew 4 percent year-over-year to 26.5 billion renminbi, or $3.8 billion, during the 2022 Chinese New Year holiday, while a New Year travel boom is expected this year.

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Dior Men’s Year of the Rabbit campaign.

Courtesy

This year, Chinese New Year falls on Jan. 22 and marks the beginning of the Year of the Rabbit, an energetic and prosperous animal that is said to be the luckiest of the 12 zodiac signs.

Pooky Lee, fashion curator and partner at the Shanghai-based creative agency Poptag, said Chinese New Year offers “an opportunity for brands and designers to demonstrate their ability to make localized creative expressions of culture.”

Louis Vuitton, Dior and Gucci have created playful and childlike motifs of the rabbit on a range of products, including festive and casual outfits, handbags, jewelry and a popular gifting item, the scarf. 

Neither Chanel nor Hermès has released any capsules for the occasion, but the latter is running a rabbit-themed edit on its e-commerce site on the WeChat mini-program.

Balenciaga is also noticeably missing from the festive event, possibly due to the recent controversies about past ad campaigns. Its Year of Tiger campaign was well received last year.

Burberry’s Year of the Rabbit campaign.

Courtesy

Burberry created a Chinese New Year capsule with the brand’s signature TB monogram reimagined with rabbit ears and cartoon-inspired motifs. Some are positioned back-to-back so that the ears meet to form a heart shape while others sit atop the Burberry logo.

The collection is accompanied by a series of short films featuring actors Qi Xi, Shi Pengyuan, and sportswoman Zhao Lina. Images were captured by video director Zika Liu and photographer Sky.

To add a sense of pop and fun, brands such as Givenchy, Mulberry, Moschino and Moncler linked with famous bunny characters to create a sense of nostalgia and cater to a broad audience base.

Mulberry collaborated with the Dutch bunny Miffy on a capsule collection featuring bags and accessories in Miffy’s signature orange, green and blue. Mulberry brought the collection to life with a campaign that features cheerful models playing hide-and-seek against the backdrop of the Shanghai skyline.

Mulberry’s Year of the Rabbit campaign featuring Miffy.

The brand said the collection’s “bright color palette and playful designs encapsulate Miffy’s joyful and adventurous spirit,” while Miffy’s “youthful character” appeals to audiences globally.

“In the short time since the collection launched, we have already seen a great reaction to the collaboration, in China and across our global store and digital network,” Mulberry added.

The American pop culture character Bugs Bunny took over Moschino’s Chinese New Year collection. Moschino’s biker bag now has bunny ears while biker jackets and silk trousers are printed with Bugs dressed in black tie and snacking on a carrot.

Moncler teamed with Roger Rabbit, the protagonist from Disney’s 1988 animated film “Who Framed Roger Rabbit,” with a campaign shot by the up-and-coming Chinese photographer Sky capturing Moncler ambassador Wang Yibo and models in a dreamlike setting.

Givenchy collaborated with another Disney character, Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, for a capsule collection.

Moschino’s Year of the Rabbit campaign featuring Bugs Bunny.

Bottega Veneta and Prada focused less on rabbits and instead created poetic narratives exploring the evolving meaning of the Chinese New Year.

For Pooky Lee, “emotionally sensitive” campaigns can further engage the younger generation of Chinese consumers who value nuanced, creative expression from brands. “It means that you truly understand and respect the complexity of the market,” said Lee.

Bottega Veneta released a fashion film called “Reunion in Motion,” which portrays young travelers, including Chinese model Liu Wen, embarking on journeys back home. 

Echoing creative director Matthieu Blazy’s vision of setting “craft in motion,” the brand also set in motion a traditional green-skinned train that bore no brand markings, only the slogan “On the road back home, Happy New Year.” 

Stills from Bottega Veneta’s “Reunion in Motion” fashion film.

The month-long initiative will take passengers from Shanghai to Dalian, making a special stop at the Shanhaiguan district near the Great Wall, a nod to the Italian luxury brand’s destination campaign for the Year of the Tiger in 2022.

Prada also took a subtle approach by focusing on creating an intimate connection with its brand ambassadors. Named “Memories of Beauty,” the campaign features Prada ambassadors Cai Xukun, Chunxia, actor Yufan Bai and model Du Juan alongside still-life images of objects such as a record player and a pot of daffodils, which “bear witness to moments from their past.”

For Self-Portrait founder and creative director Han Chong, celebrating traditional values such as “unity, community and shared rituals” is just as important. 

The contemporary womenswear brand enlisted British Chinese photographer Alexandra Leese and Chinese stylist Audrey Hu to recreate a scene from a family banquet in rich colors and textures.

Self-Portrait’s Chinese New Year campaign shot by Alexandra Leese.

The collection features designs for women and kids and includes holiday dresses inspired by the cheongsam, or qipao, in the brand’s signature guipure lace and crepe fabrics.

“This is our second Lunar New Year capsule collection, which has seen increasing popularity with our wholesale and retail partners,” said Chong. “We believe that part of the success is due to our sincere yet contemporary approach, respecting traditions but also celebrating this important moment with modern sensibilities that was previously missing from the market.”

Also, keen on forging new rituals and “cherishing every day,” Chinese designer brand Xu Zhi created a holiday campaign featuring friends and family dressed in his bunny-filled sweaters and cardigans. The designer, Daniel Xu Zhi Chen, even made a cameo himself. 

Xu Zhi’s Year of the Rabbit campaign featuring friends and family.

“Our ancestors celebrated the 24 solar terms and the 72 pentads, but I think the deeper meaning of creating rituals is to live in the moment, to document the love and goodwill that surrounds me, and to share that love with our customers,” said Chen.

For another local brand, Short Sentence, the Chinese New Year holiday celebration extends to Valentine’s Day. The brand unveiled the “I love you, too” (with “too” rhyming with the Chinese character for rabbit) campaign featuring red and pink “Mr. Bunny” sweaters and a rabbit hole-like window installation at the brand’s Shanghai store.

Short Sentence’s Year of the Rabbit store installation.

Short Sentence designer Lin Guan said the collection aims to break the stigma of expressing love and gratitude for family members and loved ones.

“The Chinese only express love and admiration in a very reserved fashion. Love should not be expressed passionately; if you do so to your family members, it could be met with embarrassment,” said Guan. “But when you say, ‘I love you, too,’ it’s less embarrassing.”

Dallas’ 60th Art Ball Draws Jeremy Scott, Brandon Maxwell, Jamie-Lynn Sigler and More

Dallas’ 60th Art Ball Draws Jeremy Scott, Brandon Maxwell, Jamie-Lynn Sigler and More

DALLAS — “No one can be too much tonight,” said Brian Bolke, chair and impresario of the 60th Art Ball benefiting the Dallas Museum of Art.Bolke, founder of the Conservatory boutiques in New York and Dallas, played up the landmark anniversary by encouraging “Sixties Glamorous” dress for the 350 attendees, even emailing a mood board of period fashions for inspiration.
Guests included Brandon Maxwell, interior designer Ken Fulk, beauty entrepreneur Edward Bess, artist Mickalene Thomas, actress Jamie-Lynn Sigler and “Making the Cut Winner” Andrea Pitter.

Jamie-Lynn Sigler
Kaitlin Saragusa/BFA.com

Brandon Maxwell at DMA.
Kaitlin Saragusa/BFA.com

“I was going to wear Balenciaga from 1962, but when you put on something vintage and you’re vintage, it makes you look vintage,” said Becca Cason Thrash, glittering in a slinky sequined Rodarte. “Vintage is for young girls.”

Becca Cason Thrash and Jeny Bania
Bruno

Major sponsor Nancy Rogers glowed in a verdigris satin Empire gown with cluster beadwork custom made for her by Jeremy Scott.

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Jeremy Scott and Nancy Rogers
Kaitlin Saragusa/BFA.com

The Moschino creative director was the man of the cocktail hour, having supplied painterly fashions from his Picasso-inspired spring 2020 collection to dress the doormen, DJ and several models, who posed in living tableaux photo ops for guests.
“I’m thrilled to be here and be Nancy’s guest and support the organization,” Scott said. “I’m from Kansas City, so I’m your neighbor. I love coming here because everyone is so friendly and genuine.”
Mary McDermott turned heads in a whimsical floral swing tunic and bellbottom pants created exclusively for her by longtime local designer Terri Camarillo Nytra.
“People don’t understand that this used to be a costume party,” said McDermott, whose late mother Margaret is the museum’s single biggest benefactor. “The first one I remember was ‘The Rites of Spring.’”
Fulk swanned among the ladies, joking about a 15-year affair with Thrash and cuddling up to Christen Wilson with the comment, “Just call us the Dallas couple.”
“He’s doing our house,” Wilson chimed in, “and he knows I’m a minimalist and he’s a maximalist.”
A number of the women sported newly natural silver hair, while Bag Snob blogger Tina Craig had colored her long hair red.

Brian Bolke and Tina Craig
Bruno

“I got divorced, and I’m reinventing myself,” Craig said.
The vintage theme permeated the menu, which opened with a globe of caviar atop onion dip served with potato chips followed by beef pot pie and crudités on a silver tray reminiscent of TV dinners and chunky banana pudding with Nilla wafers.
In his remarks, DMA director Augustín Arteaga couldn’t help but tease the upcoming “Cartier and Islamic Art: In Search of Modernity” exhibition running May 14 to Sept. 18. The DMA co-organized it with the Musée des Art Décoratifs in Paris and in collaboration with the Musée du Louvre and support from Cartier.
“It is going to be beautiful,” Arteaga said. “It is going to be the most mind-blowing thing ever.”

The 35 Best Modest Looks from Milan Fashion Week Fall/Winter 2022

The 35 Best Modest Looks from Milan Fashion Week Fall/Winter 2022

Milan Fashion Week came back strong after two years in the deep due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Making bold choices, participating designers played with the fall and winter season colors of black, brown, white, beige, blue, and silver/grey, creating an almost dark/light academia aesthetic. Standing out were Roberto Cavalli’s striking leopard patterns with draping suit jackets and majestic cape dresses, while Dolce & Gabbana made statements with headscarves paired with demure silhouettes in monochrome palettes. Versace embraced a similar mood, but with form-fitting shapes, and Jil Sander took on a more formal approach and offered a modest suit in yellow and a grey dress paired with white leather gloves.
Below, check out the 35 best modest looks spotted on the runways of Milan Fashion Week.
Dolce & Gabbana. Photo: Courtesy of Fillippo Fior
Gucci. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Roberto Cavalli. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Versace. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Max Mara. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Roberto Cavalli. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Alberta Ferretti. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Versace. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Max Mara. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Roberto Cavalli. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Prada. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Alberta Ferretti. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Loro Piana. Photo: Courtesy of Loro Piana
Versace. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Dolce & Gabbana. Photo: Courtesy of Fillipo Fior
Moschino. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Emporio Armani. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Max Mara. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Dolce & Gabbana. Photo: Courtesy of Fillippo Fior
Fendi. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Giorgio Armani. Photo: Courtesy of Fillippo Fior
Bottega Veneta. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Versace. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Fendi. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Etro. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Versace. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Jil Sander. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Gucci. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Prada. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Jil Sander. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Versace. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Gucci. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Bottega. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Emporio Armani. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Giorgio Armani. Photo: Courtesy of Fillippo Fior
Read Next: The 27 Best Modest Looks from London Fashion Week Fall 2022 Ready-to-Wear

Gigi Hadid Closed One Of Moschino’s Wildest Shows in a Dramatic Gold Gown

Gigi Hadid Closed One Of Moschino’s Wildest Shows in a Dramatic Gold Gown

Photo: Instagram.com
Gigi Hadid has had a busy start to Milan Fashion Week, beginning the day on the Alpine-themed Max Mara runway and ending it at one of the most bonkers Moschino shows to date. Closing Jeremy Scott’s extravaganza, the model wore a dramatic gold gown with a sweeping tulle train, which was paired with matching gloves featuring gold leaves wrapped around the arms.

With Gigi stopping to pose with her arms aloft, the show harked back to the fun fashion spectacles from the ’80s and ’90s – which was appropriate for a flamboyant collection that saw models going down the catwalk in candlestick headpieces and harpsichord dresses.
Gigi’s sister Bella also walked the show, wearing a keyhole dress featuring gold baroque detailing, followed by a sultry floor-length number. The sisters were later seen posing backstage with Scott, who himself donned a red space suit (a replica of David Bowman’s in the film 2001: A Space Odyssey that gave an insight into the creative director’s incredible mind).

With both Gigi and Bella in Milan, expect the Hadid sisters to continue dominating the catwalks this season – though the theatrics of this Moschino show will be hard to beat.
Originally published in Vogue.co.uk

Amy Winehouse Auction Garners $4 Million

Amy Winehouse Auction Garners $4 Million

An auction of Amy Winehouse’s performance dresses and accessories brought in $4 million this weekend.
Hosted by Julien’s Auctions, the auction included more than 800 of the late singer’s performance dresses, accessories and other apparel to benefit the Amy Winehouse Foundation, one of the leading charities in the U.K. supporting young people.
Known for her retro style, the auction included dresses, bustiers, handbags and shoes from designer brands like Moschino, Dolce & Gabbana, Hermès, Miu Miu, Giorgio Armani and Fred Perry.
One of the most notable sales during the auction was of Winehouse’s bamboo and floral print silk halter dress — which was custom-made by her stylist Naomi Parry — that she wore during her last stage performance in Belgrade in 2011 right before her untimely death. The dress went for $243,200, 15 times the original estimated price of $15,000.

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Amy Winehouse performs onstage during her concert in Belgrade, Serbia.
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Another high-priced sale was for Winehouse’s Moschino custom-made red leather heart-shaped purse that she wore at the 2007 Brit Awards. The purse sold for $204,800, which was 13 times the original estimated price of $15,000. A floral gold lamé dress by Dolce & Gabbana Winehouse wore on stage also went 30 times the original estimated price for $150,000.

Amy Winehouse at the BRIT Music Awards, 2007.
AP

The biggest surprise came from a Temperley London tan and black jumpsuit Winehouse wore at a concert in Hyde Park honoring Nelson Mandela’s 90th birthday that sold for $121,600, which was 121 times the original estimated price of $1,000.
“Amy Winehouse is one of the rare and remarkable music icons whose incredible power and soulful expression in every word and note she sang with her distinct voice remains unmatched by no other artist in music history,” said Martin Nolan, executive director of Julien’s Auctions, in a statement. “We celebrate her singular talent and iconoclastic style in this collection of her most personal artifacts and wardrobe worn in her career defining moments.”
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Moschino to Show Women’s Spring 2022 Collection at New York Fashion Week

Moschino to Show Women’s Spring 2022 Collection at New York Fashion Week

MILAN – Moschino is making its New York Fashion Week debut this September.
The Milan-based brand will showcase its women’s spring 2022 collection, designed by creative director Jeremy Scott, on Sept. 9 in a still-undisclosed location.
The brand has shown in New York before, although not as part of the official schedule. In December 2019, the brand staged a coed runway show, presenting the men’s fall 2020 collection and women’s pre-fall 2020 lineup at the New York Transit Museum in Brooklyn.
Previously, in October 2018, Moschino hosted a show to present its collaboration with H&M at Pier 36 in New York.
New York Fashion Week, which runs from Sept. 8 to 12, will mark a return to several live events after two challenging seasons with few in-person fashion shows.

Tom Ford will present his spring 2022 collection in New York during the week, and The Met Gala for the Costume Institute exhibition “In America: A Lexicon of Fashion,” will close out NYFW.
As reported last month, several designers said they would stage a live show in September, including Gabriela Hearst, Pyer Moss, Markarian and Jonathan Simkhai. Rebecca Minkoff, who has also held live “buy now, wear now” events, is also planning a live event in September.
Others, such as Ralph Lauren, Marc Jacobs, Prabal Gurung and Michael Kors, have not yet made up their minds. Tommy Hilfiger is not returning to the NYFW calendar, as reported.
Moschino, which tapped Scott as creative director in October 2013, traditionally presents its women’s main collections at Milan Fashion Week. Over the past few years it has hosted shows around the globe to unveil its men’s and women’s resort lineups.
From 2016 to 2019, Moschino staged coed shows for its men’s spring and women’s resort collections in Los Angeles, where Scott is based. In December 2019 the brand landed at Rome’s Cinecittà studios to present the men’s fall 2019 and women’s pre-fall 2019 ranges.
See also: 
Alberta Ferretti, Moschino Parent Aeffe Sees Rebound in 2021
Moschino RTW Fall 2021
Amanda Gorman Wears Moschino for Super Bowl Preshow Performance

Amanda Gorman Served Poetry and Style at the Super Bowl

Amanda Gorman Served Poetry and Style at the Super Bowl

Amanda Gorman. Photo: Instagram/@moschino

Ahead of tonight’s Super Bowl, where the Kansas City Chiefs played against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, poet Amanda Gorman kicked off the event by reciting a poem. Gorman, who is the youngest inaugural poet, paid homage to three individuals who are making a difference: educator Trimaine Davis, nurse Suzie Dorner, and Marine veteran James Martin. She began her performance, which was pre-taped but aired live, by saying “Today we honor our three captains for their actions and impact in a time of uncertainty and need.”
Moschino SS21 ready-to-wear. Photo: Courtesy

The presence of a poet at the Super Bowl was unexpected, but it set a thoughtful tone for the evening. “Poetry at the Super Bowl is a feat for art & our country, because it means we’re thinking imaginatively about human connection even when we feel siloed,” Gorman wrote on Twitter earlier today. To deliver such a powerful poem, she needed an equally strong fashion look to do so. Gorman—who works with stylist Jason Bolden—wore an elegant but youthful look by Moschino that included a metallic blue coat with gold embellishments, and a pearl headband (following the memorable red Prada headband she wore at the inauguration, it had to be done). Designer Jeremy Scott is often known for his quirky pieces, but this intricate design proved how much of a statement a good coat can make. In football terms, it was in fact a total touchdown.

Read Next: Inaugural Poet Amanda Gorman on Her Career-Defining Address and Paying Homage to Maya Angelou
Originally published on Vogue.com

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