modest fashion

Editor’s Letter: How Our April 2022 Issue Explores the New Codes of Modest Fashion

Editor’s Letter: How Our April 2022 Issue Explores the New Codes of Modest Fashion

Sisters Hani and Ugbad Abdi in their first shoot together. Vogue Arabia, April 2022. Photo: Luigi and Iango
I’m still blown away by the fantastic feedback on our 5th anniversary issue. This festive edition resonated with readers around the globe, especially with so many Arab women who are proud to be represented on a global scale as the modern leaders and businesswomen they are. Within the first 30 minutes that we revealed the first cover on Instagram, it was shared by more than 5,000 users.
However, in fashion’s best style, what is done, is done. And it’s now time to dive deep into April, a special time when we celebrate the arrival of the Holy Month. This inspired us to build this issue around the values of family and connection, but also the ever growing importance of modest fashion. As I wrote in last month’s editor’s letter, I still struggle to understand the western obsession with modesty, and why people who don’t fully understand these codes think that they have the knowledge – and sometimes the mission – to liberate women from modesty.
Of course, all generalizations are dangerous, but I can guarantee that most Arab women who have adopted modesty don’t need to be saved by anyone. In a story penned by Hafsa Lodi, we also observe how the codes of modesty have evolved over the last couple of years, mostly depending on new cultural and economical nuances. The complexity of this topic proves once again that clothes and fashion are much more than just what we wear.
On the topic of family, hijabi supermodel Ugbad Abdi returns to our cover. This time, she is joined by her younger sister Hani, who is in front of the camera for the first time. In the interview conducted by Janelle Okwodu, the siblings share their remarkable life journey, from fleeing the civil war in Somalia and living in a refugee camp in Kenya for nearly a decade, to a dream life (but one of challenges and hard work) in the US.
Another power duo, Arabia’s favorite international couturier Stéphane Rolland and his forever muse, the Spanish supermodel Nieves Álvarez, were photographed in Paris. Rolland has been visiting the Middle East for decades, and recently designed the wedding dress of HRH Princess Hussa bint Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, the only daughter of King Salman. The idea to feature the couturier in this issue manifested after I watched his latest show in Paris and witnessed the incredible reactions from our followers on social media – his was the most liked and commented couture show of the season. It was powerful, artistic, and touching, and reminded me why I fell in love with fashion in the first place.
Read Next: Hijabi Model Ugbad Abdi and Sister Hani Star on Our Ramadan Issue Celebrating Family and Modest Fashion
Originally published in the April 2022 issue of Vogue Arabia

How Modest Fashion is Evolving and Being Embraced By Women All Around the World

How Modest Fashion is Evolving and Being Embraced By Women All Around the World

The motivations driving women across the globe to design, deconstruct, and dress in modest fashion today are as diverse as the fashion they wear.
Photo: Sebastian Kim
High necklines, low hemlines – these quintessential modest fashion aesthetics are no longer the headline-making phrases they once were. Since modesty’s buzzy foray in fashion five years ago, the retail category has not only been widely accepted and embraced, it has also evolved tremendously. Hijabi models are no longer novelties, and modest fashion is no longer limited to annual Ramadan capsules – or to Muslim consumers, for that matter. Modest fashion aggregators and marketplaces are popping up across the globe, like New York-based platform The Reflective, whose founder, Liza Sakhai, is Jewish. Nonetheless, modest fashion is projected to be a US $402 billion industry by 2024, according to the 2020/21 State of the Global Islamic Economy Report, with Muslim spending power helping propel modesty to the mainstream. The movement is a truly global one and was further spotlighted last month at Expo 2020 Dubai.
In March, Arab dress history archive and digital library The Zay Initiative hosted a talk at the Cartier Women’s Pavilion in collaboration with London College of Fashion professor Reina Lewis, exploring the relationships between culture, heritage, and modesty. Lewis, who has extensively researched modest fashion, explains that it is thriving in Muslim-minority countries in the western world thanks to Muslim designers aiming to change the mainstream narratives around women in a post-9/11 environment. “This is one of the reasons why many Muslim modest dressers I spoke to in the UK and North America specially, used fashion to communicate that they were part of contemporary life,” she shares.
It was one of the inspirations for US-bred, UAE-based designer Safiya Abdallah, who refers to her label Dulcé as “modest-inclusive.” Along with designing glamorous ready-to-wear, Abdallah initially created hoods and beanies that could be worn as hybrid hijabs, in an effort to make head coverings that were stylish yet also “inconspicuous” for Muslim women in the west. Also in March, Abdallah participated in the Indonesia Pavilion’s Modest Fashion Day at Expo 2020 Dubai, incorporating Indonesian textiles into a six-look collection for the event’s fashion show spearheaded by Franka Soeria, the co-founder of the Council of Modest Fashion and Southeast Asian fashion aggregator Markamarie. “Modest fashion is rooted heavily in culture, and countries translate modest fashion differently – some like it bright, some like it neutral, some like it merry, and some like it minimal,” says Soeria, vocalising the spirit of diversity that’s at the heart of this movement. “With hijab, for example, some say it is OK to show the neck and a bit of hair, while some want it all perfectly covered – and that’s OK,” she adds.
Thanks to the countless designers and influencers driving this style revolution, there are no universal black-and-white rules when it comes to contemporary modesty. Different hair-covering styles and scarf tying techniques have achieved cross-cultural appeal, and at the same time, the movement has shed light on the fact that hair-covering is not always a component of modesty. Parameters of coverage depend on a number of factors, including one’s religiosity, affiliation with cultural identity, region of residence, and social norms surrounding women. “I think one of the key differentials is whether the location is one in which codes of modesty and shame are a prevailing part of the local or national culture,” believes Lewis, who points out that in many Arab countries, the abaya is often worn as a cultural, rather than religious garment, whereas when a woman in the US or Europe wears an abaya, it is more likely to be “an expression of religious identity.”
With modest fashion being primarily made by women, for women, these patriarchal attitudes regarding women’s bodies are being replaced with female-led visions and creative depictions of what womenswear can look like, while remaining chic and relatively conservative. The timing is no coincidence – this is taking place as women’s societal roles evolve in countries like Saudi Arabia, where females are increasingly entering the workforce, and are no longer legally bound to wear abayas in public. While this traditional garment may stereotypically be central to Muslim modest fashion, designers in the region are deconstructing and modernizing abayas, creating a unique space to explore what modern modest fashion can look like for Arab women. Among a plethora of brands, labels like Riyadh-based Chador, which offers tailored, trench-inspired abayas in non-traditional hues, are successfully filling this void. “The abaya is an essential piece of our daily lives, and it’s constantly evolving with the modernization of the Kingdom,” explains Chador’s designer, Nora Aldamer. “Although abayas are no longer enforced, I see them as a form of expression reflecting our roots.”
Meanwhile in the west, modest fashion enthusiasts continue to fight Islamophobic sentiments to prove that they can merge their faith with fashion and fit into society seamlessly – and it’s clear that their efforts are paying off. Besides influencing luxury designers on major runways, modesty has inspired prestigious museum exhibitions such as Contemporary Muslim Fashions, which traveled from San Francisco’s de Young Museum to the Cooper-Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum in New York – and for which Lewis was recruited as consulting curator. “The fact that the globalized fashion industry now sees modest fashion as a viable aesthetic and is wooing Muslim consumers is a sea-change of enormous magnitude,” she says. As designers and consumers continue to push creative boundaries, the future of this fashion niche shows infinite promise, driven by a style conscious demographic, deeply invested in appearances. Of course, it’s key to keep in mind that modesty is a personal and ever-evolving journey. So while sartorial preferences may take new shape and form, this spirit of growth and innovation will continue to underline modest fashion, which, despite cultural differences, is a profoundly unifying force for women who choose to cover their bodies.
Read Next: Hijabi Model Ugbad Abdi and Sister Hani Star on Our Ramadan Issue Celebrating Family and Modest Fashion
Originally published in the April 2022 issue of Vogue Arabia

Hijabi Model Ugbad Abdi and Sister Hani Star on Our Ramadan Issue Celebrating Family and Modest Fashion

Hijabi Model Ugbad Abdi and Sister Hani Star on Our Ramadan Issue Celebrating Family and Modest Fashion

Ugbad Abdi. Vogue Arabia, April 2022. Photo: Luigi and Iango
Star photographers Luigi and Iango bring into focus a richly colored cover story starring Ugbad Abdi and her younger sister Hani. Abdi is the world’s leading hijabi supermodel, born in Somalia and raised in a Kenyan refugee camp after fleeing her country’s civil war, and in Des Moines, Iowa. She has walked and opened shows for Marc Jacobs and Michael Kors along with Fendi, Chanel, Burberry, Dries Van Noten, and Valentino Haute Couture, always in her hijab.
This month, returning to our cover in her first appearance after the October 2019 issue, Abdi highlights the importance of family during Ramadan. Speaking to Janelle Okwodu, Abdi, who was scouted on Instagram a few years ago, shares, “My mother saw how happy fashion made me and that having a career where I get to experience different cultures and continuously learn was so important to me.” The hijabi supermodel didn’t initially think fashion was for her, recalling, “Modeling was jarring because I didn’t grow up looking like people in the spotlight.”
Her Highness Sana Al Maktoum. Vogue Arabia, April 2022. Photo: Luigi and Iango
Coming from one of the leading families in the GCC, passionate designer and philanthropist Her Highness Sana Al Maktoum reveals her new collection of high jewelry in this issue, along with highlighting the numerous causes she supports, like the opening of Fakeeh University Hospital’s new breast clinic. The young royal speaks about her family, sharing, “The butterfly motif in my jewelry is a tribute to my grandmother, as she is my greatest inspiration and my muse. My grandmother was one of the first educated Emirati businesswomen and I’m often told by family members that I have her spirit guiding me always. She was the leading light for the empowerment of Emirati women here and I hope to carry the torch.”
Meanwhile, the undeniable shift of modest fashion penetrating the west is explored by journalist Hafsa Lodi, who decodes the motivations driving women across the globe to design, deconstruct, and dress in modest fashion today. “Hijabi models are no longer novelties, and most fashion is no longer limited to annual Ramadan capsules – or to Muslim consumers for that matter,” she writes.
On the topic of fashion, we explore another shift taken as of late by fashion houses, notably a price surge in luxury goods. “The bag regains the function of rarity, at a time of image saturation and dematerialized experiences, offering a return to the material, the tangible, reminding us of a time when luxury wasn’t industrialized and mass-produced,” comments Manon Renault, fashion critic and lecturer in cultural studies at Paris’s Sorbonne university.
Leïla Slimani
Continuing the theme of family, Vogue Arabia speaks with Morocco-born Prix Goncourt winner Leïla Slimani about her latest novel, Regardez-nous danser, the second in a planned trilogy. The writer – who also serves as emissary for French President Emmanuel Macron – considers her trilogy a tribute to the Moroccan women in her family. “To the birds who managed to fly in a sea of ants,” she says, adding, “They worked and they took care of the education of the children. They laughed, and they continued to organize parties and to live. So I think that it’s a real homage to the fact that even in a very patriarchal society, even in a society where it’s so difficult to be free, maybe – and it’s a paradox – women were freer than men in my family.”
Stéphane Rolland and Nieves Álvarez. Vogue Arabia, April 2022. Photo: Luigi and Iango
Celebrating 15 years of his haute couture house, Stéphane Rolland returns to the runway with his eternal muse, Spanish supermodel Nieves Álvarez, by his side. Both are photographed and interviewed in this month’s designer feature. Rolland, the favored international couturier of the Arab world, comments, “My Middle Eastern clients understand perfectly how to interpret couture.” Notably, in 2021, Rolland designed the wedding dress of HRH Princess Hussa bint Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, the only daughter of the ruler of Saudi Arabia. Her dream was to wear a gown that paid tribute to her country and its culture. “Together, we decided to create a contemporary gown by reinterpreting the bisht,” recalls Rolland of the standout career moment.
All this and more in the April 2022 issue of Vogue Arabia, on stands April 1.
Read Next: 13 of the Best Ramadan 2022 Capsule Collections for Iftar and Suhoor Gatherings

These Modest Fashion Events at Expo 2020 Dubai are Not to Be Missed

These Modest Fashion Events at Expo 2020 Dubai are Not to Be Missed

November 2021, Vogue Arabia. Photo: Rocio Ramos
Two exciting modest fashion shows are set to take place at Expo 2020 Dubai this coming week. The first is Indonesia Modest Fashion Day at the Indonesian Pavilion on the 13th of March 13 from 3pm to 6pm, and the second is a discussion featuring professor Reina Lewis on the Contemporary Muslim Fashions exhibition at the Women’s Pavilion on March 18 from 1:30pm to 3pm.

Indonesia Modest Fashion Day
Presenting 13 Indonesian designers and two UAE designers using Indonesian fabrics, the Indonesian fashion show is the first of its kind at Expo 2020 Dubai. Proudly emulating cultural and religious identity whilst also encouraging small and medium-sized enterprises to leave their mark and grow within the fashion industry, the modest fashion show will promote Indonesian fashion potential with their handmade fabrics and ready-to-wear collections. Especially significant are Indonesian textiles, which the event aims to expose to the global fashion scene of modest fashion.
Contemporary Muslim Fashions
Providing a reflection of her experiences as the consulting curator of the award-winning exhibition Contemporary Muslim Fashions, Professor Reina Lewis will highlight the importance of showcasing Muslim designers’ creations. The discussion will be hosted by Dr Reem El Mutwalli, founder of The Zay Initiative, introduced by Emirati Designer Feryal Albastaki, and also feature response by Hafsa Lodi, author of The Modesty Paradox. It will also point towards the significance of exhibiting fashion with cultural, heritage, and religious meaning and authenticity.
All guests must have a valid ticket to Expo 2020 Dubai to attend either event.
Read Next: 15 Muslim Influencers with Modern Modest Fashion

The 27 Best Modest Looks from London Fashion Week Fall 2022 Ready-to-Wear

The 27 Best Modest Looks from London Fashion Week Fall 2022 Ready-to-Wear

With Storm Eunice wreaking havoc in London, fashion week continued with a mix of physical and digital shows, and designers showcasing their own brand of organized chaos. Upcycling and recycling emerged as major themes of this leg of the fall 2022 fashion month, and runways saw a number of colorful patchwork pieces and uplifting new silhouettes. While these would feel right at home on a modestly dressed influencer’s Instagram feed, they were also practical enough to keep warm in, once the mercury drops.
Matty Bovan showcased de- and reconstructed bomber jackets and parkas, and Conner Ives catered to the Gen-Z with leisure suits, and silk-fringed dresses and skirts, while Elleme brought forth risqué corsetry, made winter-appropriate—and modest—by way of unconventional layers. Nensi Dojaka, the current winner of the LVMH Prize and the designer known for her daring, lingerie-based aesthetic, widened her horizons by presenting a few demure outfits centered around puffer jackets and knitwear. Bahraini label Noon By Noor flew the flag for the region by including a variety of conservative options in its fall collection that flowed seamlessly between sportswear and couture.
A few designers also worked with their strengths in new ways. At Molly Goddard, her colorful ruffled and poodle skirts, and long fishtail dresses came with sensible outerwear and snug layers. Simone Rocha’s lace-trimmed dresses layered over other dresses were contrasted with biker jackets, and Richard Quinn’s signature head-to-toe florals and maximalist silhouettes were further exaggerated. Venturing further into tailoring, Emilia Wickstead’s modest offerings included double-breasted long coats and slightly oversized suits, and Roksanda’s blazers paired with fluid dresses and puffy volumes.
Elleme
Matty Bovan
Harris Reed
Noon By Noor
Molly Goddard
Conner Ives
Ahluwalia
Conner Ives
Molly Goddard
Richard Quinn
Rejina Pyo
Harris Reed
Simone Rocha
Raf Simons
Preen By Thornton Bregazzi
Emilia Wickstead
Simone Rocha
Supriya Lele
Vivienne Westwood
Noon By Noor
Nensi Dojaka
Richard Quinn
Raf Simons
Roksanda
Rejina Pyo
Roksanda
Ahluwalia
Read Next: The 17 Best Modest Looks from New York Fashion Week Fall 2022 Ready-to-Wear

Everything You Missed at the Third Edition of Modest Fashion Week

Everything You Missed at the Third Edition of Modest Fashion Week

Photo: Instagram.com/ozlemsahin
Born to offer wider wardrobe opportunities for women of all fashion preferences, Dubai Modest Fashion Week kicked off its third edition on November 18 in a weekend return at the Rixos Premium Dubai, JBR. This year, the annual event focused on the theme of “awakening,” which was referenced through the creations of more than 40 designers who showcased a spectrum of ensembles that were perfectly timed with the opening up of cities.
Assembled by Think Fashion, a modest fashion wear consultancy and events company by Turkish duo Özlem Sahin and Kübra Aksan, the event included everything from fashion shows to panel discussions and special exhibitions. Here’s a look at some of the highlights.

The inaugral evening
The evening kicked off with Özlem Sahin taking over the runway in a shimmering black and red gown by Jordanian designer Zeina Ali. Topped off with a pair of gold earrings by Ferda Ekberi, the Modest Fashion Week co-founder also used the platform to debut a new look, switching her golden locks for a brunette mane. Sahin’s entrance was followed up by a collection of white gowns making their way onto the runway as a remixed editoin of ‘Bella Ciao’ set the mood. The creations were presented by Turkish label Mimya, and featured lots of layers, pleats, pussy bows, and feather trims.

The special picks
Dubai Modest Fashion Week also came with some noteworthy firsts. Surturban’s headdress and pre-tied turbans exhibit debuted its unique collection of regal fuchsia and white pieces with edgy elements like black spikes. And in an ode to Palestinian heritage, Neven Elkady’s wedding gown debut demonstrated deconstructed ghutras, traditional Palestinian embroidery ‘tatreez’, and an intelligent use of lace.

Leafy prints, tropical illustrations and tunics are what modern swimwear brand Coega Sunwear spotlighted this time around, while Homolog Paris, founded by Emily Cheong, brought in an elegant twist with its sustainable kaftans embellished with mosaics. And then there were Zeina Ali’s statement pieces, offering a new lens on kaftans and gowns with dramatic shoulders and a candy color palette.

Read Next: A New Fashion Week for Regional and Indian Designers is Coming to Dubai

15 Muslim Influencers with Modern Modest Fashion

15 Muslim Influencers with Modern Modest Fashion

Halima Aden, Ikram Abdi Omar, and Amina Adan. Photographed by Txema Yeste for Vogue Arabia April 2019.
Far from encompassing solely the Muslim community, modest fashion is quickly becoming a more inclusive way of dressing for women — regardless of religious and cultural background. Around the world, modest style influencers are using their social media platforms to amplify the voices calling for more covered ensembles and the mainstream fashion industry is taking notice. From fashion week runways touting longer, loose-fitting collections to hijabi supermodels starring in leading campaign shoots, the concept of modest dressing is being constantly redefined to represent the growing influence of the modest community.
Acting as a voice for modest fashion on the streets of their hometowns and the feeds of our digital networks, these visionary bloggers boasting thousands of followers each are unapologetically themselves, shifting the global perspective of modesty with their unique personal style and signature looks. With creative layering, statement accessories, and imaginative headwraps, modest-wear has never been so accessible so it only makes sense to turn to the experts for guidance. Scroll through the gallery below for a look at our some of our favorite modest style muses that continue to welcome more women into the folds of this timeless trend and empower those who do choose to dress modestly.
This Amsterdam-based entrepreneur not only wears elegant ensembles around the world but is also the owner of Shop Modiq, a boutique touting modest designs for the contemporary woman. This Kuwaiti fashion blogger has mastered the art of power suiting with bold colors and fun accents, often transforming a classic look to a haute modern-day approach. Based in Dubai, this Emirati-Palestinian influencer provides everyday inspo for conservative dressing with a blend of affordable pieces and designer accessories no matter the occasion. Often photographed traipsing the streets of her Florida hometown in an effortless mix of stylish layers, this fashion-forward influencer is also the host of the weekly podcast Arab-American Psycho, which shares her musings on life and invites other Arab women guest stars to do the same. This Sudanese-American was one of the first few hijab-wearing YouTube stars and is continuing to make waves in the fashion industry with her elevated street style that is chockfull of statement pieces, like this mustard trench. Celebrated as a modest fashionista, this Irish-Palestinian often collaborates with leading luxury brands, presenting chic combinations that play with different textures to emulate a ladylike aesthetic that is anything but one-dimensional. A Dubai-based instagrammer who likely needs no introduction, Al Ghouti is a proponent of premium streetwear embedded with her own inimitable edge and signature over-the-shoulder black hijab. This Londoner living in Riyadh is a longtime supporter of Arab designers, donning minimalist ensembles that favorite seamless silhouettes and earthy tones, whether it’s a linen abaya or knitted matching set. Known for championing comfortable yet structured pieces from patterned oversized blazers to tailored trousers, this Bangladeshi communications coordinator in Paris occasionally complements her no-nonsense outfits with a pop of traditional accessories from hometown flea markets. An Egyptian designer with an enviable closet, Taha explores the power of adventurous modestwear with abayas and bishts rooted in the season’s hottest trends. A Syrian-American content creator with an endless collection of versatile go-to pieces for the young modest generation. This emerging Swiss-Tunisian style blogger is a model for solid color-blocking combinations and vintage-inspired motifs reminiscent of her current European location. This half-Palestinian can be found photographed throughout New York City’s concrete jungle with imaginative ensembles emblematic of her thrift shop finds and cool attitude. Featuring a palette of pretty pastels and muted neutrals in dresses and skirts made for twirling, this Pakistani influencer is a vision of modest femininity. A self-proclaimed digital creator based in Stockholm, Asry is a veteran modest blogger who opts for a simple Scandinavian style that packs a subtle punch.
Read Next: This Book is Exploring the Many Forces Behind the Modest Fashion Movement

Shop the Best of Modest Fashion in This Edit of Local and International Designers Ahead of Ramadan

Shop the Best of Modest Fashion in This Edit of Local and International Designers Ahead of Ramadan

Photo: Courtesy of Net-a-Porter
The month of Ramadan is right around the corner and online luxury fashion retailer, Net-a-Porter, already has your wardrobe sorted. In honor of the sacred month that is rooted in unity and appreciation, Net-a-Porter has brought together the most covetable international and local brands in a wide-scale celebration of modest fashion. Uniting global names with local talent, the fashion retailer has curated a Ramadan Collection that defines traditional modest attire in utmost luxurious fashion.
Photo: Courtesy of Net-a-Porter
Net-a-Porter’s new collection works to satisfy soaring demand for modest apparel in the Middle East, especially around the Holy Month. According to the luxury retailer, searches for maxi and midi dresses increase by a whopping 80% during the Ramadan period alone. Listening to the needs of their local customers, Net-a-Porter has joined Taller Marmo, SemSem, Johanna Ortiz, Reem Acra, Halpern, Louisa Parris, Carolina Herrera, Jenny Packham, Rasario, Alex Perry and more, to craft the ultimate wardrobe for divine demure dressing.
Photo: Courtesy of Net-a-Porter
The Ramadan collection radiates with exciting variety, inspired by a beautiful amalgamation of international and local taste. From the regal elegance crafted locally by SemSem and Halpern, to the understated luxury channeled by global icons Carolina Herrera and Rasario, Net-a-Porter will have you dazzling with modest allure in each and every intimate iftar of the year.
Photo: Courtesy of Net-a-Porter
This collection celebrates the Holy Month of Ramadan with female empowerment and global collaboration at its core. SemSem’s creative director, Abeer al Otaiba, talks through her inspiration for the exclusives on Net-a-Porter, mentioning: “This season, I felt called to focus on the unwavering strength of women. Ramadan is a special time of reflection and self-awareness – an opportunity to hit refresh, embrace our surroundings and give back to others. It is my hope that this collection encourages women to own their strength and approach each day with confidence.”
Photo: Courtesy of Net-a-Porter
The delectable garments make their grand debut in a campaign shot against the historic Arabian landscape of the UAE’s “garden city” – Al Ain.  Nisreen Shocair, CEO of Yoox Net-a-Porter, Middle East accentuates the symbolic significance of the collection and campaign: “Ramadan is a special month for me and this Ramadan collection and campaign feel very close to home.  The collaborative process of working with these amazing local and global designers and shooting the campaign in Al Ain perfectly captures the aesthetic and mood of the collection: beautiful, soothing, grounding yet inspiring; and that’s how we see our customers celebrating Ramadan this year with Net-a-Porter Arabi.”
Photo: Courtesy of Net-a-Porter
Net-a-Porter has become no stranger when it comes to reflecting the fashion-focused needs of the local market. As they move towards greater specialization in personalized merchandising, their new shopping experience is specifically designed for the Middle East, offering customers dual-language searching in their respective local currencies. Supporting regional talent is also at the heart of the luxury retailer, not only in this revolutionary Ramadan collection but also in their commitment to mentoring emerging local designers as a part of their didactic Vanguard Program.
Photo: Courtesy of Net-a-Porter
Traditional Ramadan lanterns are lighting up the runway, as Net-a-Porter makes way for a world of chic modesty and redefines fashion through the lens of unity and empowerment.
Photo: Courtesy of Net-a-Porter
Read Next: Exclusive: Dolce & Gabbana Unveils a Joy-Sparking Collection Ahead of Ramadan

15 of the Best Modest Looks from the Fall 2021 Season to Covet

15 of the Best Modest Looks from the Fall 2021 Season to Covet

How uplifting to witness the new Fall 2021 collections starting to filter through – they feel like a temporary jolt out of a pandemic-induced haze. And designers really have gone ‘all-out’ this season, presenting beautifully ethereal films (Dior) and cinematic shorts (Miu Miu) from the dreamy halls of the Palace of Versailles to far-flung snow-capped mountains. Lockdown has obviously inspired the desire for wanderlust and fantasy, and the fashion? Well, it’s all the better for it.
An undercurrent of protection and utility – familiar narratives for Winter offerings – is, understandably, evident once again in oversized quilted coats (Chloe), padded ski jackets (Miu Miu) and cropped shearling-trimmed bombers (Givenchy). At Dior, Maria Grazia Chiuri tucked 50s headscarves into turtleneck sweaters, topped with elegantly-cut, ankle-grazing coats – investment pieces that feel right, for now.
Going back to the aforementioned ‘jolt,’ take in Jonathan Anderson’s bold and offbeat collection for Loewe to feel the fizz of new ideas blossoming. Zig-zag prints, cocoon shapes, colorful accessories – this is outright fun and frivolous fashion that requires no justification… coming to an extravagantly staged Tim walker editorial soon. This is artwork for the body: a blue two-piece trimmed with giant tassels, draped silk tops with huge buckle-like embellishment, wide striped culottes, and fluffy psychedelic mohair sweaters – pieces that simply radiate joy.
For those going back to the office, there are plenty of suggestions for an elevated everyday wardrobe from Elie Saab, Hermes and Fendi, whose flowing silk skirts and belted tonal blouses with extra-wide cuffs combine comfort, modesty and chic wearability. Jil Sander, too, has plenty to inspire a wardrobe refresh with long leather gloves and point-toe knee boots paired with geometric dresses, topped with a neck scarf in the same print – effortless layering done really, really well.
Read Next: 5 Key Fall 2021 Fashion Trends to Know Now

Saudi Label Leem’s New Collection is All About Understated Elegance

Saudi Label Leem’s New Collection is All About Understated Elegance

Are you craving a more minimalist, pared-down wardrobe in 2021? Have you been looking at those spur-of-the-moment fast-fashion buys with shameful regret? Are the world’s vast environmental issues weighing heavily on your mind? It’s time for a refresh. Look no further than the streamlined elegance of Saudi label, Leem, whose second drop of Fall 2020 […]
The post Saudi Label Leem’s New Collection is All About Understated Elegance appeared first on Vogue Arabia.

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