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Depop, IMG Models Launch Online Pop-up to Benefit Black in Fashion Council

Depop, IMG Models Launch Online Pop-up to Benefit Black in Fashion Council

Depop and IMG Models have joined forces to unveil an exclusive Depop shop that will benefit the Black in Fashion Council.Shoppers who look to models for style cues can now buy their pre-loved things — IMG Models has mined the closets of Joan Smalls, Ian Jeffrey, Kaylin Rivera Baer, Lily Aldridge, Tess McMillan and Wisdom Kaye, for pre-worn apparel, jewelry, bags and accessories to offer exclusively through the IMG Models shop on Depop.
The online shop is live and will remain that way for one month. Items being sold on the online shop retail from $25 to $400, and 100 percent of the sale price for each item sold (save for the applicable PayPal transaction fee) will be donated to the Black in Fashion Council to further their efforts around diversity and inclusion in the industry.

“Fashion is all about self-expression — a physical manifestation of our emotions, and a way for people, no matter who they are, to be seen in their truest forms,” supermodel and activist Smalls said in a statement. “It’s so important that those in and out of the industry continue to support organizations like [the] Black in Fashion Council, who are fighting for diversity, equity and inclusion within fashion.…Everyone, no matter the color of their skin, their size, or their background, deserves to feel included in the industry, and that’s why we’re all on a mission to change fashion.”

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Racism remains a crucial problem in the fashion industry with Black professionals continuing to face “widespread discrimination and prejudice,” according to the first BIFC Human Rights Campaign report, which was released last month. Along with having “upheld white supremacist ideologies” and having created “glorified standards of beauty and artistic expression that are explicitly anti-Black,” the industry is lacking in many ways, the report noted.
The council is comprised of editors, models, media executives, freelancers and other creatives who are trying to build a new foundation for inclusivity. The organization is committed to creating lasting change in the industry in an array of areas. Improving diversity, inclusion and pay inequities within individual companies and executive boards, as well as through marketing and advertising are some of the issues that need attention, the council report noted.
Regarding how the funds from the exclusive online shop will be used, council cofounder Sandrine Charles said: “We are going to finalize and announce at the top of 2022 once we have an amount.”
Widely known models like Smalls, who was recently photographed by Chrisean Rose for the December/January edition of InStyle, will help boost interest in the Depop initiative through their fans and followers — Smalls has 4.4 million followers on Instagram alone.
Having modeled for Victoria’s Secret, H&M and Sports Illustrated’s swimsuit edition among many others, Aldridge has a robust base of her own with 5.6 million followers on Instagram. And she said she’s honored to support the council along with IMG Models and Depop in this cause.
“It gives me so much joy that my items will have a second life with people who are making positive change in the world,” Aldridge said.

Fashion icon and content creator Kaye is looking to the future with the project. “There are kids in the world searching for someone, who looks like them, who’s doing what they want to do when they grow up, and this is what motivates me to push forward and it’s why I am honored to support the Black in Fashion Council,” Kaye said.
Models aren’t the only ones bringing their communities to this endeavor. Resale platform Depop is said to have more than 26 million users.
IMG Models has been exploring ways to “continue supporting underrepresented Black talent and creatives,” according to director of marketing and production Ryan Dye, who is proud that the company’s models “are coming together to support the BIFC and their initiatives.”

A Day in the Life of Model Malika Louback, the New Face of Loro Piana

A Day in the Life of Model Malika Louback, the New Face of Loro Piana

Malika Louback. Photo: Courtesy of Loro Piana.
With a portfolio studded with international Vogue covers, Malika Louback is just getting started. The engineer turned model combines the two professions with flair, having started her full-time modeling career after graduating in materials science engineering. Born in Djibouti, the 26-year-old moved to France seven years ago and currently calls Paris home. This leitmotiv is mirrored in her look – a mix of tailor-made fashion with Djiboutian influences and Parisian boyish chic.
Louback has been announced as the new face of Italian luxury label Loro Piana. We caught up with the model to find out what a day in her life looks like, her first fashion memory, and her ultimate style advice.
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What is your connection to fashion? When did you start to work in this industry?
I have been working in the fashion industry since September 2019. It was love at first sight. This world resonates with me and I am completely charmed and captivated by it. I feel like it’s mutual as I get lots of positive vibes back.
How do you reconcile your work as an engineer with that as a model?
I always wanted to work and evolve in industries that are distinctly different. My engineering experience helps me to be more attentive to detail in my job as a model. I juggle different projects and I am constantly discussing ideas with my father, who is an engineer too. This double role inspires me to no end.
What does a typical day in the life of Malika look like?
Wake up – coffee – a moment of gratitude – reading the news – morning calls with my sisters – work – sport – dinner – film.
What are you the proudest of?
Of the woman that I am becoming, and of my successes.
As for fashion, what is your first memory?
This takes me back to when I was seven or eight years old, in my parents’ bedroom, to be precise. I loved to watch my mother get ready to go to work, to a wedding, or to other events like boat rides with my father. I would watch her choose her outfits, accessorize them, do her hair, and finish with a touch of perfume. It was such a ritual that fascinated me.
How would you define your style?
It’s a mix between my grandmother’s wardrobe and urban inspirations. When I was growing up I developed a boyish style, but I was always drawn to and fascinated by the retro cuts of the outfits worn by the women in Djibouti, where I am from.
Photo: Courtesy of Loro Piana.
According to you, what are the essential pieces a woman should always have in her wardrobe?
My essential and timeless wardrobe pieces are:
1. Straight cut wide-leg pants in brown or black, which enhance the natural shape of the legs. They’re very feminine.
2. A black oversized coat – a classic which brings comfort and a touch of delicacy.
3. Silk pajamas to get ready for a night just as important as a day.
4. A black roll neck which is, for me, the ultimate feminine and sensual piece.
5. A black belt to enhance the silhouette or bring a finishing touch to an outfit.
6. Finally, lots of scarves, either classic or printed, to frame the face.
What is your ultimate fashion advice?
Stay true to your heart. Being yourself is the best way. Look to your childhood and whatever you are truly drawn to and you will find your style.
What does it mean to have style, for you?
Knowing your body and accepting it as it is.
In your opinion, who is the Loro Piana woman and in which ways do you see yourself in her?
For me, the Loro Piana woman combines softness with authenticity in a very subtle manner. I completely see myself in her because her personality matches mine. She has a softness and a sensitivity which naturally leads to charisma.
What are your essential basics?
White sneakers, navy blue pants, and a sweatshirt. These are simple and comfortable pieces that you are sure to have a great day in.
What is your relationship to bags?
A bag is the final touch of any outfit. Whether it’s worn over the shoulder, across the body, or held in the hand, it naturally follows the movement of the body. Depending on the model, it can hold quite a large amount of your personal belongings. This is why I prefer rigid models like the new bag by Loro Piana, the Sesia.
Photo: Courtesy of Loro Piana.
Who are your style icons?
I don’t really have any. I learned to love fashion by working in this industry. When I was younger, I was a passionate student who wanted to be an engineer. Little by little, I discovered the 1990s supermodels and I loved their energy. Two of my favorites are Iman and Farida Khelfa.
Your bedtime reading?
The Four Agreements: A Practical Guide to Personal Freedom by Don Miguel Ruiz, a guide to daily life which resonated with me from the first time I read it. I totally adhere to the philosophy. It’s all about being conscious and getting the most out of our being and blessings.
Your culinary specialty?
Tiramisu.
A song you listen to on repeat?
“Ojuelegba” by Wizkid.
Which project are you working on at the moment?
I’m currently working on a project that I would love to develop in Djibouti. It’s linked to my studies in engineering and it also pushes me to explore new fields at the same time. I would love to talk more about it, but I am the kind of person who prefers to let a project speak for itself once it’s finished.
Take a look at Loro Piana’s new Sesia handbag here.
Read Next: Why Loro Piana’s New Online Store Dedicated for Saudi Arabia is So Special

H&M Reveals Upcoming Collaboration With Leading Model’s Label

H&M Reveals Upcoming Collaboration With Leading Model’s Label

THIS JUST IN: After a rocky few weeks, H&M today revealed its newest collaborator: Liya Kebede.
Next month the Sweden-based retailer will unveil a collaboration with Lemlem by Liya Kebede. The assortment of kaftans, sundresses, jewelry and other sundries will debut May 6.
Hennes & Mauritz has been in the news after seeing sales slide by 21 percent in the first quarter and being removed from all major Chinese platforms, due to the Xinjiang cotton ban. H&M also may shed more than 1,000 jobs in Spain.
On a brighter note as part of the tie-up with Kebede, H&M will be donating $100,000 to the Lemlem Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the African-made fashion brand that she started in 2006. Her idea to start a company was sparked during a trip to her homeland of Ethiopia. After meeting a group of female traditional weavers, who no longer had a market for their specialty, Kebede decided to create a brand that would use their craft skills.

Lemlem means to bloom and flourish in the Ethiopian language of Amharic. The company is committed to preserving traditional weaving, championing artisanship and expanding production and creating jobs in Africa. The Lemlem Foundation was created to support impoverished women artisans in Africa with programs that offer job opportunities, health care and responsible production. Through partnerships with social enterprises, the foundation supports training for female artisans in Ethiopia and Kenya to strengthen their skills and prepare for jobs in the textile and fashion industry in Africa.
The upcoming collaboration is in line with H&M’s efforts to play up sustainability. The relaxed styles are made of organic linen, recycled polyester and Tencel Lyocell. The collection will carry the Lemlem x H&M label and it will be offered for one season in select stores and online. Swimwear will also be in the mix, along with a pair of pants, shirt, short-sleeved dress and bags among other items.
Kebede recently participated in a creative collaboration between Vogue and Off-White. The model was art directed by Vogue Italia and photographed by a team that had never worked together.

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