MM6 Maison Margiela

MM6 Maison Margiela RTW Spring 2022

MM6 Maison Margiela RTW Spring 2022

Ah, the simple pleasure of sitting on a café terrace for an aperitivo. The MM6 Maison Margiela team left boxed snacks, including pickled onions in a jar painted white, offered beer and gin cocktails and then served up a compact, quirky collection of white suiting and black dresses with extra sleeves here and there; warped chessboard prints galore, and a hilarious faux-fur roller suitcase in collaboration with Eastpak.
The look: Power suits, soigné evening gowns and rugged streetwear with a surrealist bent, all the way through to clownish, checkerboard printed ensembles with neck ruffs. Surrrealist female artists Claude Cahun, Leonora Carrington and Dorothea Tanning were among the muses for the design team.

Quote of note: “Sleeves and gloves become key vehicles for the collection’s surreal undertones, protruding from trouser waistbands, bag handles and even the back panels of a leather jacket, and traces of the making process are felt in a kraft paper bustier and an intricately pleated calico ruff skirt.”
Key pieces: Black evening columns made of elegantly sagging lining fabric; and taut biker jackets with extra sleeves hugging the waist.
Takeaway: If you’re plotting a “The Queen’s Gambit” party or binge rewatch, you’ll be spoiled for choice for chessboard-patterned clothes.

Myar Launches Children’s Wear Line

Myar Launches Children’s Wear Line

MILAN — Teach them young, teach them right: kids are about to get their share of upcycled fashion, courtesy of Andrea Rosso.
The founder and creative director of army uniform upcycling label Myar has launched Myar Kids, targeting boys and girls aged 4 to 12.
The brand will add to the portfolio of Brave Kid, OTB Group’s company that specializes in the research and development, production and distribution of children’s wear for high-end international brands. These include Diesel, Dsquared2, Marni, No. 21 and, starting this week, also MM6 Maison Margiela.
Launched as a men’s wear brand, Myar is best known for breathing a second life and new energy into deadstock fabrics and military garments, which under Rosso’s vision make for creatively compelling, repurposed clothes.

“We started from men but then noticed that military garments on a female body looked prettier and less stereotyped so we started to think how different and funnier they could have looked on kids,” said Rosso, admitting that “at the beginning I was hesitant, but then I thought of giving it a try.”
Even scaling down silhouettes, the designer maintained the Myar philosophy during the creative process, using deadstock fabrics sourced from OTB’s different companies as well as other suppliers.
As a result, the collections are made of unique pieces in limited edition, each additionally carrying a QR code enabling kids and their parents to learn about the provenance of the items and the sustainable procedures implemented during production.

Graphics featured in Myar Kids’ first collection. 
Courtesy Photo

In particular, Rosso liked the idea of overturning the usual relationship between parents and children, letting the youngest to educate the oldest for once.
“I thought: ‘What if it is the son to teach something to his parents?’ At the end of the day, parents did the whole environmental mess,” he noted, underscoring that the aesthetics of the line is meant to be fun but also deliver eco-conscious messages.
Rosso imbued a playful spirit into the brand’s signature military aesthetics in its first Myar Kids collection, which launches with the spring 2022 season. T-shirts and hoodies are printed with images of endangered sea animals, ranging from turtles to whales, while the same aquatic theme is also reinterpreted with handmade graphics mixed with ecological slogans. Utility shirts and cargo pants crafted from military camouflage garments appear next to cotton separates made from vintage Hawaiian shirts.
The Myar Kids line will be available not only at the brand’s e-commerce but also at the online store Brave Kid just debuted to carry the children’s wear assortments of some of its licensing partners.
As reported, despite the pandemic, Brave Kid managed to grow its business in 2020, when the company’s revenues were up 5 percent to almost 50 million euros. The firm expects to close 2021 with a 15 percent growth compared to 2020.

See Also:
Brave Kid Launches Online Store, Expands Portfolio
Philipp Plein Inks Kids’ Wear License With Altana Group
GCDS Aims to Grow Bigger With New Children’s Wear Partnership

Brave Kid Launches Online Store, Expands Portfolio

Brave Kid Launches Online Store, Expands Portfolio

MILAN — Brave Kid, OTB Group’s company that specializes in the research and development, production and distribution of children’s wear, is in expansion mode.
Already a kid’s licensing partner of a range of high-end international brands, including Diesel, Dsquared2, Marni and No. 21, Brave Kid has signed a new agreement with MM6 Maison Margiela for the launch of the fashion house’s first line targeting boys and girls aged four to 14.
The first MM6 Maison Margiela children’s collection will launch with the spring 2022 season, even if the partnership between the two companies was teased with a capsule for fall 2021.
“We have big expectations for the launch of this new line, especially because there is a great buzz around MM6 and Maison Margiela,” said Germano Ferraro, Brave Kid’s chief executive officer. “Our president Renzo Rosso is personally involved in this project, which aims to translate MM6’s signature aesthetic into compelling children’s collections.”

While Brave Kid is looking to other partnerships in the kid’s wear industry to expand its portfolio, the company is also making a foray into retail.

MM6 Maison Margiela Kids Fall 2021 
Courtesy of Brave Kid

Brave Kid has just debuted an online store, carrying the children’s wear assortments of some of its licensing partners, including Diesel, Marni and No. 21. The MM6 line will debut on the new e-commerce site with spring 2022 deliveries.

“We believe that the online retail business will play a bigger and bigger role for the future growth of companies,” Ferraro said. “We see great opportunities in this segment and, thanks to our direct e-commerce, will be able to offer a complete overview of the offering of our brands, which is impossible to convey in the world of wholesale.” In addition, the executive added that capsules and special deliveries will hit the e-commerce platform during the year.
Despite the pandemic, Brave Kid managed to grow its business in 2020. The company posted revenues of almost 50 million euros, up 5 percent compared to 2019.
“I think that we managed to grow also in such a challenging year because clients have rewarded those companies, like ours, that respect deliveries and supported them with payments and everything,” said Ferraro, who expects Brave Kid to close 2021 with 15 percent growth compared to 2020.
SEE ALSO: 
Philipp Plein Inks Kids’ Wear License With Altana Group
Modes Gets Bigger in Children’s Wear With MiniModes Stores
GCDS Aims to Grow Bigger With New Children’s Wear Partnership

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