Milan Fashion Week

Kate, Amber, and Naomi Lead an Army of Supermodels at a “Fendace” Show to Remember

Kate, Amber, and Naomi Lead an Army of Supermodels at a “Fendace” Show to Remember

Photo: Getty
“Please join me for an intimate creative experience,” read Donatella Versace’s invitation to the fashion pack on the closing day of the Milan spring/summer 2022 shows. The blockbuster production that unfolded on Sunday evening was by no means “intimate” when you consider the scores of fashion fans tuning in across the globe, but creativity between two of the biggest luxury houses in the world certainly abounded. Believe the hype – Fendace has landed. Just don’t call it a Fendi X Versace collaboration.
Gigi Hadid. Photo: Getty
What unfolded was a fabulous switch-up, which saw Donatella Versace and Kim Jones swap roles to create two uniquely brilliant, logo-heavy collections inspired by their friendship and the cultural relevance of the two heavyweight brands they are at the helms of. First up, Jones, the king of transfusing streetwear and subcultural style through a luxury lens, put his mark on Versace with a little help from Kristen McMenamy, Paloma Elsesser, Lila Grace Moss, Karen Elson, Kate Moss, and Amber Valletta.
Naomi Campbell. Photo: Getty
Then, Mona Tougaard, Gigi Hadid, Emily Ratajkowski, and Naomi Campbell brought to life the queen of no-holds-barred glamour Donatella’s Fendi vision, as Drake, Future, and Young Thug blasted out their latest song with intermittent “Ciao! Donatella!” broadcasts across the airwaves. It was to borrow the words of Dua Lipa, who opened the Versace spring/summer 2022 show on Friday and sat front row at the special showcase.
Donatella and Kim taking a bow surrounded by the supers. Photo: Getty
Even more sizzling? Elizabeth Hurley, who sat front row with her son Damian, Iris Law, and Winnie Harlow. The original Versace girl – who put the brand’s now-iconic safety-pin embellishment on the map at the premiere of Four Weddings and a Funeral more than 25 years ago – demonstrated the definition of smoldering, while Damian did his own version of Blue Steeling for the cameras.
Demi Moore, Damian, and Liz Hurley. Photo: Getty
Dua Lipa and Winnie Harlow. Photo: Getty
It was a glitzy family affair from start to finish and reflective of the spirit of collaboration currently in the air. While Gucci’s “hacking” of Balenciaga will go down in history and Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons’s co-design partnership breaks new ground, no one can quite dial up the drama like Donatella and Kim. Brava.

Read Next: Dua Lipa Debuts a Major Hair Transformation on the Versace Runway
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

The Best Street Style Looks at Milan Fashion Week SS22

The Best Street Style Looks at Milan Fashion Week SS22

With a majority of shows being physical at Milan fashion week SS22, attendees have all the more reason to serve their best street style ensembles. Spotted dashing between shows for Prada, Fendi, Max Mara, Brunello Cucinelli, and more were editors, models as well as It girls from the region who have become fashion week regulars over the years. As the third leg of the fashion month draws to a close, take a look at the best street style to come out of Milan this season.
Read Next: 5 Things to Know About Prada’s SS22 Shows in Milan and Shanghai

Versace RTW Spring 2022

Versace RTW Spring 2022

Celebrities and supermodels, prints and crystal mesh, foulards and safety pins — and a a big dose of fun. All the ingredients of the signature explosive Versace formula were there on Friday night when the fashion house returned to the physical format with a flamboyant show.To the tune of her retro pop hit “Physical,” British music star Dua Lipa, the face of Versace’s fall 2021 advertising campaign, made her catwalk debut walking the runway twice: she opened the show in a black skirt suit with slits kept closed by multicolor safety pins and she closed it — and took the final bow with Versace — in a hot pink crystal mesh set.

She was not the only notable on the runway. Along with the most-requested models, Gigi Hadid included, the cast featured Emily Ratajkowski; Naomi Campbell, – her statuesque beauty exalted by a mannish suit in a bold pink tone – and Madonna’s daughter Lourdes Leon Ciccone, wrapped in a silver crystal mesh gown.

On the catwalk, which featured a roof created with silk foulards that were waved by shirtless perfectly abbed models rhythmically pulling black ropes, Versace unveiled a rich, big co-ed collection true to the brand’s heritage.

The brand’s iconic safety pins made a playful comeback in brightly colored variations that peppered several black dresses and separates with slits, vertical cuts and cut outs. Foulards stole the spotlight. Splashed with vibrant patterns, they were not only used as accessories but became an integral part of the pieces, for example as inserts in a denim mini frock, peeping out from the edges of a sexy vinyl bustier dress or from the waist of a pair of classic fluid pants in a deep burgundy tone paired with a matching coat and a logo T-shirt.

“The foulard is a fundamental component of Versace’s heritage and character. It’s acted as a canvas for our iconic prints and is worn in multiple ways from knotted tops to headscarves to bag accessories, it’s a way of adding Versace attitude to any look,” said  Versace chief creative officer Donatella Versace. “The foulard has been with us since the very beginning of the brand, but this season turns everything on its head, it is no longer fluid or dreamy, the scarf is provocative, sexy, wound tight.”

Vivid colors, from sorbet shades to neon hues, added an energetic boost to the show’s flamboyant vibe, underscored by maxi floral and geometric patterns, as well as logos – especially on the men’s pieces, which had a varsity, sporty vibe, or on the knit sweaters and vests enriched with an intarsia Versace crest.

There was lots going on here, but the joyous collection, which included a lineup of unapologetically sensual evening options, was a strategically studied and commercially savvy take on Versace’s iconic exuberance that  should keep its parent Capri Holdings happy.

GCDS RTW Spring 2022

GCDS RTW Spring 2022

Giuliano Calza’s beachy bright collection — full of raffia, jangly jewelry and hand crochet — was a salute to summer and a post-lockdown life. This unisex collection had it all — soft and sun-bleached denim, manga comic references, slinky eveningwear with hidden logos and a sustainability angle, too.It all hung together in a surreal film written and directed by Calza that took viewers to the desert, and to an underwater jellyfish world. During a walk-through of this upbeat collection, Calza, whose title is creative director, said he wanted it to be “comfy, easy — and precious, too. I designed it knowing it would be the first collection to hit the beach post-pandemic.”

There was lots of flashiness and fun in the form of a tailored jacket paved with pink crystals, courtesy of the Czech company Preciosa, and a long, screaming yellow sunhat-slash-cape with a melting popsicle design, a nod to the late Franco Moschino.

Little crochet pirate heads were stitched together to form a minidress, a long fringed skirt and a tank top, all of them studded with fat faux emeralds. The designs were inspired by a characters in “One Piece,” the Japanese animated series produced by Toei Animation. 

Calza, who sold a majority stake in GCDS earlier this year to the Made in Italy Fund, which looks to promote small and medium-sized brands, is also taking an eco-turn, introducing a new “green label” for spring, filled with clothing and accessories made with sustainable or upcycled denim and jersey.
There were also chunky clogs that looked as if they were made of rubber, but instead were fashioned from recycled and compostable materials. The designer will be showcasing the new green label at Selfridges in the coming months. 
Despite all the flash and green flourish, there was one thing missing here — the in-your-face logo. Calza’s a pro at reading the industry tea leaves, and believes now is not the time for bold statements.
Instead, he sneaked the GCDS letters into the chunky chains on hobo bags, traced them lightly onto a long, black sequin dress and the buttons of a shirt — a cool act of subversion.

Tod’s RTW Spring 2022

Tod’s RTW Spring 2022

Tod’s creative director Walter Chiapponi admitted he may never turn his back on the bon-ton aesthetics he feels is so ingrained in his style – and that is so personal, as it always reminds him of his childhood and his mother. However, for spring the designer wanted to add a tomboyish streak to his designs.
He introduced a strong knitwear component for the first time, with short patchwork dresses or crochet tops with nubby fringes derived from the art of carpet-making. The knits contributed to the comfort factor that is a key trend in Milan.

Skirts were all short, sometimes with raw edges, and Chiapponi kept the cocktail silhouette simple, as in A-line coats.
A ‘60s vibe ran throughout the collection as Chiapponi ticked off Federico Fellini, Anna Magnani and Isabella Rossellini photographed by Robert Mapplethorpe, as well as films such as “La Dolce Vita,” “Rosemary’s Baby,” “ Valley of the Dolls,” and “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” as inspirations – cue the pretty bucket hats. At the same time, models walked in front of photos of artist Carlota Guerrero’s installation at the PAC contemporary art museum – a reminder that Chiapponi is designing for today’s “multifaceted woman,” he noted.

Several looks hinged on details that emphasized Tod’s core material – leather. For example, large pockets in dark calf stood out in contrast on a sand-colored, sleeveless shirt jacket. Chiapponi also combined leather and linen, which gave a short dress a modern and new texture- almost shiny.
The designer also worked with nylon, on colorful, puckered windbreakers for a sportier look.
Chiapponi obviously paid great attention to Tod’s bread-and-butter –  shoes and bags – emphasizing the T signature logo and the pebble motif. Sandals were offered with macro rubber soles – although at times they looked too clunky –  but there were also daintier kitten-heeled pointy shoes.
Small bowling bags embellished with the pebble pattern were jazzed up by vivid yellow, turquoise and bright red hues.

Milan Fashion Week Returns in Full Swing With IRL Events

Milan Fashion Week Returns in Full Swing With IRL Events

MILAN — “Energy” was a recurrent word during the press conference Italy’s Camera della Moda president Carlo Capasa hosted on Tuesday to officially present the Milan Fashion Week schedule.Capasa particularly expressed his satisfaction over the return of physical events, which will account for 125 of the 173 appointments scheduled for show week, which will run from Sept. 21 to 27.
“We’re inverting the trend compared to the last couple of [mainly digital] editions, which is something that gives us a powerful injection of energy in this moment,” said Capasa.
The schedule features 42 IRL shows out of 65 in total. For instance, Roberto Cavalli, under the creative direction of Fausto Puglisi; Moncler, and Boss, the sister collection of Hugo Boss, are returning to the calendar and set to host physical events. For the first time, brands such as MM6 Maison Margiela, HUI and Vitelli will stage runway shows in Milan.

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Prada, Fendi, Giorgio Armani, Versace, Missoni, Salvatore Ferragamo, Marni, Max Mara, Jil Sander, Alberta Ferretti, Etro and MSGM are among the established names slated to present their collections in-person, while Emilio Pucci, Dsquared2, Antonio Marras, GCDS and Philipp Plein are some of the brands sticking to the digital format this season.
As reported, Gucci will head to Los Angeles to present its next collection on Nov. 3, coinciding with the LACMA Art+Film Gala taking place on Nov. 6, for which the fashion house is the founding and presenting sponsor. Yet the brand will host a special event dubbed “Vault” during Milan Fashion Week, the details of which are still under wraps.
Moschino and Bottega Veneta are missing from the Italian schedule as the former will showcase its women’s spring 2022 collection as part of New York Fashion Week, while the latter, after decamping to London and Berlin, will stage a show in Detroit on Oct. 21.
In addition to Gucci, other events on the Milanese calendar will include the “The Way We Are” exhibition marking the 40th anniversary of the creation of the Emporio Armani brand and to be staged at the Armani Silos venue, as well as cocktail parties celebrating the 20th anniversary of Pomellato’s “Nudo” collection, the 50-year career of Chiara Boni and the 60th anniversary of the Marcolin eyewear company.
As for the annual “Green Carpets Fashion Awards,” this year Camera della Moda will forgo the event that traditionally wrapped the city’s fashion week in September. Having ended the collaboration with Livia Firth and the Eco-Age agency, the Italian fashion chamber will reprise the event next year under the new name, “CNMI Sustainable Fashion Awards.” More details will be unveiled on Sept. 22, when the organization will host an event, but Capasa said that the concept will remain the same and continue to acknowledge the work of those who stand out for their application of sustainability principles in fashion.
Shows at Milan Fashion Week will officially kick off on Sept. 22 with the We Are Made in Italy (Black Lives Matter in Italian Fashion Collective) digital presentation, offering five new talents who are people of color the chance to display their collections in a video filmed by Antonio Dikele DiStefano, the writer and filmmaker behind the Netflix series “Zero.”

The Milan schedule will also mark the debut on the official calendar of labels including Colville, Andreadamo, Defaince by Nicola Bacchilega, Roberto Di Stefano, Iuri, Traffico, Radica Studio and Airin Tribal, among others.
All physical events will be accessible upon the showing of the “Green Pass” as per the Italian government’s decision. The pass enables citizens to enter schools, bars, restaurants, cinemas and other indoor venues by certifying they have been vaccinated, read negative to a test or recovered from COVID-19 in the previous six months.
Capasa himself strongly appealed to everyone to get vaccinated as “this is the only weapon we have against the virus” and underscored the beneficial effects the vaccination campaign had on the economy since the Italian fashion industry’s sales significantly rebounded in the first half of 2021, registering a 24 percent increase compared to the same period last year.
Projections for sales generated by the fashion industry and categories such as jewelry, beauty and eyewear combined show 20.9 percent growth to 83.1 billion euros in 2021 compared to the 68.8 billion euros in 2020. In 2019, sales generated by those industries were 90.2 billion euros, so the positive projection elaborated by Camera della Moda would still not mark a return to pre-COVID-19 level.
“If the Christmas holiday season and relative sales will go well and this projection is confirmed, we would recover 15 billion euros out of the over 22.5 billion euros we lost last year. We wouldn’t make up for all the losses but we aim to recover the rest in 2022, if not even grow next year. I think there’s great attention on Italian fashion right now, and data on our export performance confirm this,” said Capasa.
Exports are expected to increase 24.5 percent to almost 70 billion euros by the end of 2021 compared to the previous year.
In the first five months of the year, exports of Italian fashion goods grew 27.6 percent. Top destinations included Switzerland, France, Germany as well as the U.S. and China, where exports were up 31.9 percent and 93.9 percent, respectively, compared to the same period last year.
As for Milan Fashion Week’s attendance, Capasa said that European and American buyers and members of the press are expected, while fashion operators from China won’t be present due to travel limitations.

The international appeal of the event will be boosted by many initiatives Camera della Moda has included in the schedule.
These comprise the sixth edition of “Budapest Select,” spotlighting four Hungarian brands, and the first effort of the “Fashion Bridges” project it launched with South African institutions and South African Fashion Week earlier this year. Four former students of Polimoda were paired with young designers of the SAFW to develop capsule collections that will be unveiled during Milan Fashion Week, before traveling to Johannesburg Fashion Week at the end of October.
To further support young talents, the seventh edition of Milano Moda Graduate will showcase nine talents hailing from different Italian fashion schools, while emerging brands Amotea, Des Phemmes, Federico Cina, Froy and Traffico will be promoted at Rinascente as part of the “Milano Fashionable Project” initiative developed by the retailer with Camera della Moda.

Italy’s New Training Initiative Will Help Refugees and Migrants Start Careers in Fashion

Italy’s New Training Initiative Will Help Refugees and Migrants Start Careers in Fashion

Etro FW21. Photo: Instagram/@cameramoda
The National Chamber of Italian Fashion has presented a new initiative on the occasion of World Refugee Day on June 20. Called Fashion Deserves the World, the project enables 15 young refugees and migrants who wish to pursue a career in fashion to able to study and find work in Italian fashion companies.
Also coinciding with Men’s Fashion Week in Milan from June 18 to 22, Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana (CNMI) has collaborated with Mygrants, a start-up and charity company that offers micro-learning programs in three languages ​​to help migrants and refugees master skills and find jobs. It is part of a calendar of initiatives promoted by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).
Photo: Courtesy of CNMI
With retirements set to take place in the next three to four years, there will be 40,000 vacancies in the fashion industry, so this small operation will also benefit Italian companies in need of new employees, according to CNMI president Carlo Capasa. “Two years are necessary to train new professional figures and it would be a disaster to lose the quality of our craftsmen who are leaving their jobs without heirs,” he said. Capasa also called for “specific training paths including at a government level.”
Laura Lucci, in charge of private sector partnerships for UNHCR Italia, said that “companies need a turnover of well-trained and motivated people and, according to the latest macroeconomic studies, the diversity brought by migrants is an added value.”
Applications will open on June 21 for migrants, refugees and stateless persons who are fluent in Italian and have a strong will to work in the fashion sector on the Mygrants organization website. It will then be reviewed by the startup and by CNMI. The 15 finalists will participate in training sessions and start working in companies under the patronage of CNMI.
Read Next: Paris Hails a Bombastic New Shopping Address with the Reopening of La Samaritaine

Sunnei Canvas Experience Gets Physical at Milan Fashion Week

Sunnei Canvas Experience Gets Physical at Milan Fashion Week

MILAN — One of Milan’s trams clanked across the city covered in white and a giant Sunnei logo during Milan Fashion Week.
It was a fitting marketing strategy for a brand always on the move and that this season wanted to reconnect with a more physical dimension after a year of digital experimentations.
The most notable of its activations in this area is the Canvas project introduced last year and aimed at enabling wholesale partners to build their own Sunnei collections through a customization service. Available at a dedicated VR-enhanced platform, Canvas offers select retailers the chance to personalize genderless carryover pieces including ready-to-wear and accessories by intervening on design aspects of each item, changing the length of sleeves, fabrics, colors and stitches, among others.

This time the brand translated the experience IRL, welcoming buyers to the Palazzina Sunnei headquarters, which were recently expanded to accommodate new communal spaces, offices and a showroom that staged a multisensorial installation.
Here, the white samples of the new Canvas collection were displayed next to screens connected to the platform, helping buyers to better envision the styles and touch fabrics while creating their own range.

Sunnei’s third Canvas collection. 
Courtesy of Sunnei

In its third iteration, the Sunnei Canvas collection was expanded to also include knitwear as well as new accessories, ranging from footwear to the brand’s Peso bag. New options in terms of prints were added, such as the “Everyday I wear Sunnei” slogan that was a recurrent motif across the showroom.

The hip Milanese brand’s founders Loris Messina and Simone Rizzo also extended the concept to end consumers, stepping into the business-to-consumer customization arena.
Upon pre-registration on the label’s website, from June 20 to 27 customers will be able to visit the space and directly personalize Sunnei pieces, receiving them at home after two to three weeks. The same opportunity will be also offered on sunnei.it.
For the moment, the assortment dedicated to end consumers will include just a T-shirt and shopping bag, which can be customized mostly in terms of prints and graphics and are priced at 130 euros and 150 euros, respectively.
“This is a test for now, but it’s something that we had in mind since the very beginning of the Canvas project,” Messina said on Saturday. “We’ll see how the audience will react, but the idea has always been to give this opportunity to everyone.”
The designer additionally stressed that there won’t be any overlap in the offering dedicated to two categories, as buyers will have different options in terms of designs and additional personalizations to pick from.
“The ultimate goal of Canvas is to not overcrowd the market with the same product everywhere,” he explained.

One of the avatars of Sunnei’s third Canvas collection. 
Courtesy of Sunnei

For Messina, hosting the experience in a showroom answered the need to physically reconnect with the brand’s community and return to social life. As much as the company has a strong digital and social media expertise, physical events remain essential for its strategy.
“We can’t wait to return to stage a fashion show in September. [Runway shows] represent such an important moment for us and for everyone in this business, as we live with the energies we receive from others,” he concluded.

Back Home: Lawrence Steele Returns to Aspesi as Creative Director

Back Home: Lawrence Steele Returns to Aspesi as Creative Director

MILAN — Lawrence Steele bought his first Aspesi garment when he was a 22-year-old graduate from the Art Institute of Chicago and was cutting his teeth at Moschino in Milan. At that time, Franco Moschino was designing for the Milan-based Aspesi brand, which was established by Alberto Aspesi in 1969.
“It was a padded jacket, called Moschino,” said the American designer who, as the son of a U.S. Air Force officer, spent his childhood traveling across the world, from the U.S. to Germany and from Spain to Japan, with his family.
After working at Moschino and Prada and in 1994 launching his namesake line, now discontinued, Steele eventually landed at Aspesi with a job as a creative consultant, which he retained for 13 years until 2017.

Following a stint as associate creative director at Marni, collaborating with his longtime partner and creative director Francesco Risso, Steele is now making his debut as official creative director of Aspesi with the spring 2022 season.
“It’s very exciting to be back,” said Steele during an interview at the brand’s showroom in the center of Milan. “In this new role, I can express more of myself and this doubles up the challenge.”
Steele, an elegant man with an innate sense of style, perfectly reflects the very Milanese spirit of the brand, which transcends trends and the boundaries between genders to convey an idea of a discreet, chic lifestyle.

A look from the Aspesi spring 2022 collection. 
Courtesy of Aspesi

According to Steele, the whole concept of Aspesi’s roots can be understood through a comparison with the Italian fixation with the art of cooking pasta.
“Here in Italy, people perceive the difference between a plate of pasta that has been cooked 30 seconds more or less. It’s about a culture of quality,” the designer said. “For me, Aspesi is all about that.”
In keeping with this vision, Steele prefers to use the word wardrobe, instead of collection, to define the brand’s lineups, which are conceived to offer men and women functional and refined everyday pieces that can fit different occasions of use. Uniqueness at Aspesi is not conveyed through quirky, unexpected silhouettes, but through a sense of familiarity made interesting with the use of special materials and treatments. For example, the brand employs a Japanese cotton fabric that is made using American looms from the ’50s, and an Irish linen whose peculiar texture is due to the uniqueness of the Irish water used to produce it.
In his new role with Aspesi, Steele has two ambitions: the first is to make the brand more available worldwide, even if “we want to stay niche, but appealing to a global niche;” the second is to reach new generations, while not forgetting about loyal consumers.
According to the designer, the digital world, from social media to e-commerce, can play a key role in growing the international visibility of the brand and reaching younger consumers. And he thinks that Aspesi, with its compelling set of values, has all the potential to resonate with new generations. “When we were young, we used to see the future as an empty box ahead of us, but if you look at Gen Z, you can already see so many different futures driven by technology, global awareness and political movements,” he said. “They really live in the present and we have to do the same.”

Aspesi spring 2022 collection. 
Courtesy of Aspesi

Aiming at offering a cross-generational fashion proposal, Steele started designing the spring lineup from one item, the trench, which with its utilitarian attitude has definitely an emotional link with the designer’s family background. In particular, the designer created a long and fluid style, which, echoing the construction of a shirt, is presented in a nylon garment dyed version with a languid feel.
“This item is quintessentially genderless,” said the designer, who for spring developed a wardrobe spanning from corduroy jackets with a late ’60s feel to more yuppie shirts, oversize cargo pants and canvas trousers, but also embroidered bowling shirts with a holiday souvenir-like spirit and jacquard knitted vests, available in two color options, “one more inspired by Bob Marley’s look, the other which reminds me more of Paul McCartney’s passion for bright colors,” Steele said. Formalwear is interpreted with a light hand, resulting in fluid suits crafted from high-end fabrics with a subtle iridescent effect.
“At the end, it’s all about proportions, volumes, colors — a mix of neutrals combined with pops of bright tone — and special fabrics,” said Steele, revealing the formula behind Aspesi’s signature recipe.

Gigi, Bella and Korean Celebrities Helped Power Digital Fashion Weeks

Gigi, Bella and Korean Celebrities Helped Power Digital Fashion Weeks

Don’t underestimate the Bella and Gigi effect: The modeling Hadid sisters accounted for 45 percent of the Media Impact Value that Versace earned for its fall 2021 fashion show, while only 2 percent came from less famous runway regulars Mica Argañaraz and Rianne Van Rompaey.
“You need to think about who are those talents who connect with your consumers,” Alison Bringé, chief marketing officer of the data research and insights company Launchmetrics, said at a press conference Tuesday on Zoom to disclose key findings from the most recent round of fashion weeks.
Bringé also noted that newsworthy names can greatly amplify the impact of social media posts. For example, Launchmetrics calculated that three posts by Gigi Hadid about the Versace show generated MIV of $3.3 million, but were amplified by others to reach MIV of $7.1 million. “She’s become a standout face and name within our industry,” Bringé stressed.

In effect, she characterized the digital runway as the new front row and stressed that “influencers and celebrities are not going away.”
The impact of influencer voices grew 13 percent and celebrities 394 percent during Milan Fashion Week, Launchmetrics data show.
Savvy brands have created “mini at-home experiences” instead of just sending paper or digital invitations, Bringé noted, flashing a slide showing an Instagram post from French influencer Léna Mahfouf displaying the pastel-colored macaroons and funky Fornasetti goodies that Louis Vuitton dispatched ahead of its fall digital reveal.

The recent round of shows also highlighted the rising importance of Asian influencers and celebrities, who generated 29 percent of total MIV at Milan Fashion Week. This compares to 20 percent generated by traditional media. At Prada, 70 percent of MIV earned by celebrities came from Asian voices.

A look from Prada’s fall 2021 digital show. 
Courtesy of Prada

Overall, 41 percent of celebrity and influencer MIV during Milan Fashion Week came from South Korean voices, Launchmetrics said, singling out a post by actress Song Hye-Kyo, a Fendi ambassador, that earned $477,900 in MIV, eclipsing the value of a post by Chiara Ferragni, who previously held a record.
Indeed, “all-star” influencers — those with followings greater than 2 million — came roaring back during the recent fashion month, with the MIV of their content growing by 65 percent versus 30 percent for lower tiers of influencers.
Many brands simply had influencers create posts about “waiting for the show to start.” Model and Parisian style icon Caroline de Maigret, who did so for Chanel, was among the friends of the house that accounted for 30 percent of its “owned media” placements and 28 percent of their value.
Bringé called brands’ “owned media” — their Instagram, YouTube, Twitter, Facebook and other social media accounts — “the voice to watch” in future fashion weeks. The MIV generated by these channels grew 23 percent during Milan Fashion Week, for example.
Prada was singled out for doing a bang-up job leaning into this strategy with its fall 2021 show, up to and including dedicated content for Spotify, which yielded a 25 percent increase in MIV for its owned media.
Dior also got a shoutout for creating unique content for region-specific channels, allowing it to connect with audiences in a more personalized way. One example is a vlog posted by Chinese actress Liu Yuxin on the French brand’s Weibo account.

By contrast, traditional media saw the share of value of its voice during fashion weeks drop by 22 percent, with Launchmetrics blaming “media fatigue” and a dearth of original content. On the plus side, photo galleries, which Bringé characterized as “small and digestible pieces of content,” increased 238 percent for couture, 62 percent for Milan Fashion Week and 30 percent for London Fashion Week.
The most recent digital fashion weeks were more fractured than ever, with a few New York early birds and many stragglers, with Celine, Balenciaga, Gucci, Saint Laurent and Michael Kors among big names that have yet to unveil fall 2021 collections.
Asked about the breakaway effect on audience size, Bringé said “in general, most brands do better when they show on schedule,” allowing that marquee names can do well whenever they show.
She acknowledged the “long tail” of digital media, noting that MIV for videos starts to grow in earnest about 30 days after the livestream.
“There’s a lot of ways to create echo around videos post-fashion week,” Bringé said. “Content is king no matter if it’s a physical or a digital event.”
See also:
Digital Fashion Weeks Grapple With Stragglers

Launchmetrics CEO on Amplifying Digital Fashion Weeks

Blackpink’s Rosé Incites Stampede to Saint Laurent Broadcast

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