Miami Design District

Cult Gaia Opens Pop-up in Miami Design District

Cult Gaia Opens Pop-up in Miami Design District

As with many of her creative and business decisions, Cult Gaia founder Jasmin Larian let serendipity lead the way, this time to Miami.The Los Angeles-based brand opened its yearlong pop-up in the Miami Design District with a cocktail party cohosted by influencer Aureta. The 2,000-square-foot space designed by Brandi Howe marks Larian’s sole retail store until a same-sized, permanent flagship bows on Melrose Place this summer. If all goes well, Miami could also become permanent.
“Everything we’ve done successfully has come to us,” said Larian, whose pieces were already being worn all over Miami, her third biggest market after New York and Los Angeles, when district developer Craig Robins presented the opportunity. “Miami is this magical place. People there have joie de vivre, a zest for life, which is what we cater to.”

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Howe, a recent transplant from New York with a background in set design, also came to her serendipitously. For the boutique, they envisioned a Zen garden sprouting custom pedestals in pineapple onyx and calacatta rosa marble with bags and shoes as blossoms. Pebbles, greenery and ceramic planters by Los Angeles artist Sloane Angell, as well as Miami artisans, accentuate the effect. Additional standout pieces include a bench by Mexican architect Frida Escobedo and Fiam’s Phantom wall mirror, while creamy white Venetian plaster achieves the minimalist, sanctuary mood Larian prefers.
“We were very inspired by silver chrome, too,” she said, of wrapping a thread-like, chrome installation around the interior to hang clothing. “Chrome is beautiful to me because it feels like a liquid. We interpreted it in an organic way here.”

A Cult Gaia linen dress.
Courtesy of Nordstrom

Instead of devoted sections for categories, swimwear, ready-to-wear and accessories are mixed. Larian said she likes to create a sense of discovery. Cult Gaia Mini, her inaugural children’s capsule, arrives in store next month. Pieces like the Lev shorts for $58, Berry active swim set for $118 and Francis sundress with a ruffled neckline for $138 are available exclusively through her website’s e-commerce.
Home goods are also on the horizon, starting with custom glass pieces that will debut this summer. Larian plans to develop exclusives for Miami once she gets a read on the market. She hasn’t been able to do personal appearances at her Miami wholesale accounts because the division launched during the pandemic. The line is represented at Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom and Saks Fifth Avenue, among 300 wholesale accounts, including international and online stores and a current pop-up at Harrods.
“Visiting the Miami store was the first time I was in front of customers in a while,” she said, regarding how feedback is invaluable to her design process. “Instagram is great for customers to connect directly, but watching them touch, style and wear pieces is a whole other experience.”

Antonio Lopez’s Illustrations Adorn Fendi Cafè, Pop-up in Miami

Antonio Lopez’s Illustrations Adorn Fendi Cafè, Pop-up in Miami

DISCO FENDI: Fendi’s spring collection spiked with artworks by Antonio Lopez is landing in Miami with a series of activations aimed at celebrating the disco-era inspired lineup.
Reprising its successful Fendi Caffè format that debuted in Miami’s bustling Design District last summer, the Roman house is mounting its latest iteration inside the OTL restaurant with zingy sunset-inspired graphics taken from Lopez’s fashion drawings. Colorful rainbows and illustrations of the so-called “Lopez girls” were turned into billboards adorning the facade and interiors of the café and the neighboring Fendi store.
A 1970s, pop-tinged vibe runs through the space, with rainbow-bearing tables and baby pink armchairs, as well as custom Fendi table settings and takeaway sets. Blending local cuisine with signature Italian flavors, the café will be open at breakfast and lunchtime through May 1 serving FF-logoed cappuccino, toast and paninis, as well as pastries wrapped in Fendi packaging.

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The table setting at the Fendi Caffè in Miami’s Design District.
Courtesy of Fendi

Over the weekend, the Italian luxury brand also opened a pop-up store at Miami’s Aventura Mall. In sync with the overarching theme, the 576-square-foot space features billboards bearing Lopez’s illustrations covering the metal structure on the facade. Inside the store, splashes of red, orange and yellow, as well as an all-pink fitting room, liven up the otherwise neutral-hued space. Offering ready-to-wear as well as accessories, the pop-up runs through April 20.
For spring, artistic director of haute couture, rtw and fur collections for women Kim Jones zeroed in on Lopez’s body of work, which Karl Lagerfeld also long admired. Fendi collaborated with The Estate and Archive of Antonio Lopez and Juan Ramos for the collection, which allowed Jones to deep dive into the archives and pluck his motifs, which he blew up on jersey dance dresses, drifting caftans and as leather intarsias on handbags and shearling capes.
SEE ALSO:
Kim Jones, Nikolai von Bismarck Conjure Bloomsbury With New Fendi Book
Fendi to Open First Casa Store in Milan
Fendi RTW Spring 2022

Fendi Collaborates With Sarah Coleman for Design Miami Project

Fendi Collaborates With Sarah Coleman for Design Miami Project

For the upcoming edition of Design Miami, running from Nov. 27 to Dec. 6, Fendi has decided to give its boutique, which opened in 2015 in Miami’s Design District, a makeover.
For the project, the Roman luxury house tapped New York-based visual artist Sarah Coleman, who cut her teeth next to archi-star Peter Marino and built a name for herself by manipulating designers’ materials to rethink everyday objects through an ironic filter.
Leveraging Fendi’s archives of materials and vintage pieces, the artist, channeling a Seventies inspiration, used the brand’s bag fabrics to create patchworks of prints that she used to cover furniture pieces inside the boutique. In addition, she created collages of images from vintage magazines that she juxtaposed to Fendi’s archival pictures on the one-of-a-kind Zig-Zag chair and she covered a sofa with the FF green sustainable cotton and recycled polyester fabric.    

Coleman manipulated the fashion house’s signature Pequin striped motif and the FF logo pattern she redesigned with a playful vertigo effect. While the former was splashed on the Miami store’s facade, which was colored in Fendi signature yellow, as well as on the carpets and the displays inside the shop, the latter became the theme of a limited-edition Peekaboo handbag. The FF logo pattern, revisited with a psychedelic twist, was rendered on a yellow leather embossed style and also was embroidered with multicolor threads on a white canvas design and a white leather style enriched with phosphorescent beads.

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“Fendi’s archive was very inspiring, they have never let themselves be boxed in creatively throughout their history, and this constant pushing of the boundaries helped me feel free to reinvent. I began working in my studio on a collage wall, which led to the creation of two furniture pieces for the store. My best work came from the times that I was able to fully engulf myself in the world of Fendi and its rich history, before repurposing and interpreting what I found there in a less literal sense,” Coleman said. “Working with Fendi, I was given such freedom to create — the only instruction Silvia Venturini Fendi really gave was ‘be disruptive.’ This allowed me to really experiment, to say ‘yes’ to everything and give it a chance to exist. She really empowers those around her to create without judgment, which is an amazing feeling. To experience her vision first hand is incredibly inspiring and allowed me to really push to create something I’m really proud of.”
The Fendi Miami Design District store revamped by Sarah Coleman.  Courtesy of Fendi

“I love Sarah’s sense of artistic fun and clever irony, we share this same approach to creativity so of course I was naturally drawn to her work. She communicates this so well via her Instagram, [which is] the best way to discover her pieces and [gain] an insight into her artistic world. Sarah has already been repurposing our iconic prints in her work. This invited the opportunity to see how this creativity can evolve by collaborating. Her work embodies our spirit of taking handcraft in new directions, she can reimagine the conventional into the unexpected,” said Fendi men’s and accessories’ creative director Silvia Venturini Fendi. “At Fendi we have a strong womanhood heritage and ethos, so it’s always a pleasure to work with female talents. For the Design Miami projects alone, we have worked with such fantastic names, including Cristina Celestino, Sabine Marcelis, Chiara Andreatti, amongst others. They provide the perfect complement to what we are creating with our collections. I’m so proud of what we’ve achieved with these designers and artists over the years, I can’t wait to see people’s reactions to our next project with Sarah. And who knows…this may be just the beginning of a collaboration.”

Combining Coleman’s arts and crafts approach with Fendi’s fun and ironic spirit, the Miami boutique also presents a one-of-a-kind white canvas Peekaboo bag that the Americana artist embellished with plaster and acrylic paint decorations. Coleman is the latest artist to turn the Peekaboo bag into a work of art. In fact, the project started in 2018, when Fendi asked designers and artists Chris Wolston, Kiichiro Ogawa, Oscar Wang and Teo Yang, along with Dutch designer Sabine Marcelis, to customize the Peekaboo bag in the year of its 10th anniversary.
Sarah Coleman inside the Fendi Miami Design District boutique.  Courtesy of Fendi

The first luxury label to collaborate with the Miami-based art institution, Fendi has been a presence at Design Miami for more than a decade. The brand made its debut at the Miami-based art fair in 2008, when it sponsored the Design Talks, roundtables with the world’s leading designers, including Aranda/Lasch, brothers Fernando and Humberto Campana, Tom Dixon and Arik Levy.
Last year the fashion house collaborated with design studio Kueng Caputo, formed by Lovis Caputo and Sarah Kueng, to create pieces meant to decorate the exterior colonnade of the brand’s headquarters at the Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana in Rome. Caputo and Kueng created 10 pieces, named “Roman Molds,” combining the brand’s supple Selleria leather with terracotta bricks. In addition, in December, during the art festival, Fendi hosted an event at its Miami boutique in the Design District to unveil the Fendi Frenesia Baguette, featuring patented scented leather created in collaboration with perfumer Francis Kurkdjian.

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