Jeremy Scott

Dallas’ 60th Art Ball Draws Jeremy Scott, Brandon Maxwell, Jamie-Lynn Sigler and More

Dallas’ 60th Art Ball Draws Jeremy Scott, Brandon Maxwell, Jamie-Lynn Sigler and More

DALLAS — “No one can be too much tonight,” said Brian Bolke, chair and impresario of the 60th Art Ball benefiting the Dallas Museum of Art.Bolke, founder of the Conservatory boutiques in New York and Dallas, played up the landmark anniversary by encouraging “Sixties Glamorous” dress for the 350 attendees, even emailing a mood board of period fashions for inspiration.
Guests included Brandon Maxwell, interior designer Ken Fulk, beauty entrepreneur Edward Bess, artist Mickalene Thomas, actress Jamie-Lynn Sigler and “Making the Cut Winner” Andrea Pitter.

Jamie-Lynn Sigler
Kaitlin Saragusa/BFA.com

Brandon Maxwell at DMA.
Kaitlin Saragusa/BFA.com

“I was going to wear Balenciaga from 1962, but when you put on something vintage and you’re vintage, it makes you look vintage,” said Becca Cason Thrash, glittering in a slinky sequined Rodarte. “Vintage is for young girls.”

Becca Cason Thrash and Jeny Bania
Bruno

Major sponsor Nancy Rogers glowed in a verdigris satin Empire gown with cluster beadwork custom made for her by Jeremy Scott.

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Jeremy Scott and Nancy Rogers
Kaitlin Saragusa/BFA.com

The Moschino creative director was the man of the cocktail hour, having supplied painterly fashions from his Picasso-inspired spring 2020 collection to dress the doormen, DJ and several models, who posed in living tableaux photo ops for guests.
“I’m thrilled to be here and be Nancy’s guest and support the organization,” Scott said. “I’m from Kansas City, so I’m your neighbor. I love coming here because everyone is so friendly and genuine.”
Mary McDermott turned heads in a whimsical floral swing tunic and bellbottom pants created exclusively for her by longtime local designer Terri Camarillo Nytra.
“People don’t understand that this used to be a costume party,” said McDermott, whose late mother Margaret is the museum’s single biggest benefactor. “The first one I remember was ‘The Rites of Spring.’”
Fulk swanned among the ladies, joking about a 15-year affair with Thrash and cuddling up to Christen Wilson with the comment, “Just call us the Dallas couple.”
“He’s doing our house,” Wilson chimed in, “and he knows I’m a minimalist and he’s a maximalist.”
A number of the women sported newly natural silver hair, while Bag Snob blogger Tina Craig had colored her long hair red.

Brian Bolke and Tina Craig
Bruno

“I got divorced, and I’m reinventing myself,” Craig said.
The vintage theme permeated the menu, which opened with a globe of caviar atop onion dip served with potato chips followed by beef pot pie and crudités on a silver tray reminiscent of TV dinners and chunky banana pudding with Nilla wafers.
In his remarks, DMA director Augustín Arteaga couldn’t help but tease the upcoming “Cartier and Islamic Art: In Search of Modernity” exhibition running May 14 to Sept. 18. The DMA co-organized it with the Musée des Art Décoratifs in Paris and in collaboration with the Musée du Louvre and support from Cartier.
“It is going to be beautiful,” Arteaga said. “It is going to be the most mind-blowing thing ever.”

Details Magazine Founder Annie Flanders Dies at 82

Details Magazine Founder Annie Flanders Dies at 82

Details magazine founder and cultural connector Annie Flanders died Thursday at age 82.Flanders died of natural causes at the Hollywood Hills, a Pacifica Senior Living Community, where she had been residing for several years, according to fashion writer and creative consultant Rose Apodaca. A member of The Neptune Society, as was the case with her late husband Chris, Flanders will be cremated.
Celebrations of Flanders’ life are being planned for Los Angeles and New York this spring.
As founding editor and publisher of Details, Flanders was honored in 1985 by the Council of Fashion Designers of America for her “fresh approach to journalism.”
Decades before trend forecasters, management consultant groups and algorithms dictated pop culture fashion’s force with consumers, Flanders helped guide the zeitgeist by not just observing it, but living it.  Aside from grasping the ins and outs of the apparel industry’s seasonal grind from firsthand experience, Flanders also understood how fashion, art, music and Manhattan’s downtown culture collided.

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Along the way she mined a slew of talents who came of age somewhere between the late Seventies and early Nineties. Anna Sui, Isabel and Ruben Toledo, Steven Meisel, Bruce Weber, Richard Tyler, Jeremy Scott, Stephen Gan, Arianne Phillips, Michael Schmidt and Patrick Kelly were among the talents that Flanders helped elevate. Perhaps the designer Betsey Johnson summed up the sentiments of many when she presented Flanders with her CFDA award, thanking her “for taking me seriously despite what I look like.”
Flanders helped expose the world to what was happening in the interlaced worlds of fashion, art, culture and more with a heavy emphasis on what the mainstream magazines weren’t covering, said Apodaca, who first caught Flanders’ attention in 1986 at the age of 18 by wearing a DIY “crazy outfit with a tutu and a ginormous green bow.”
Flanders was also an early advocate of the fight against AIDS, as a founding board member of the Design Industry Foundation for AIDS in 1984, the organization that is more commonly known as DIFFA. In that post for eight years, she helped create and co-chaired “The Love Ball,” an annual fundraiser that also showcased voguing, which Flanders featured in the pages of Details. Madonna was said to have first seen voguing at the event and later spotlighted it in her 1990 “Vogue” music video for MTV.
Flanders’ AIDS-related fundraising efforts included co-chairing the New York City edition of Live Aid, an event that spotlighted 80 designers in a fashion show that raised money for families in Ethiopia. Like much of her dealings, her connection to Africa was personal. In 1971,  Flanders and her husband moved there with their young daughter Rosie to help create jobs and offset the-then minuscule rate of employment. With the help of the king of the north province of Makala, they opened a factory to make leather clothes and handbags, Apodaca said. Their mission was to teach their 300 employees how to be self sufficient and to take over the factory when their two-year commitment ended. The family returned to New York in 1973.
Born Marcia Weinraub, Flanders legally changed her first name to “Annie” in the mid-Seventies because she preferred it. While attending New York University’s School of Commerce, Accounts & Finance in the late Fifties, she majored in retail and minored in journalism. Despite living a good part of her life in Los Angeles, Flanders had an inveterate New York streak – perhaps due in part to having won a New York City pageant in 1959.

Post-NYU, her fashion experience stemmed from an early job as an assistant fashion director at Gimbels department store, selecting items for window displays and coordinating fashion shows for the Manhattan outpost and suburban locations. Flanders moved on to a buyer role at Stern department store’s 42nd Street store.
By 1967, Flanders had ventured out on her own by opening the progressive boutique Abracadabra at 243 East 60th Street. Flanders once explained that she was keen to showcase “the new fashion designers and artists, who I was told were unacceptable for department stores because they either couldn’t put up advertising money or the production was too small or they couldn’t afford to accept returns.”
In tune with the youthquake street style that was storming cities like London and Los Angeles, and the independent boutiques that were cropping up to dress them, Flanders wanted to invent her own way, according to Apodaca. The  interior featured a mirrored sculpture that had been salvaged from a “Hall of Mirrors” in an abandoned amusement park in New Jersey. Flanders’ original press release for the store’s opening touted that it was located in the “Swingers District of Manhattan.” The clientele included Penelope Tree, Mia Farrow and Britt Ekland, among others. The retail spectacle garnered coverage in WWD, Vogue, The New York Times and Cosmopolitan.
In 1970, Flanders unveiled a second location at Lexington Avenue and East 51st Street, occasionally staging fashion presentations there that were televised.
After returning to the U.S. from Africa, she worked as a women’s and juniors’ buyer and merchandise manager at AG Field in Jackson Heights. During that run, she chronicled her fashion finds as a style columnist for the Soho Weekly News from 1976 through 1980. She then rallied former Soho Weekly News staffers Bill Cunningham, Stephen Saban, Dan Gershon, Ronnie Cook and others to launch Details in 1982.
Flanders once explained in an interview with The Daily Front Row how she came up with the magazine’s name in the most innocuous way. While living in Woodstock, N.Y., one afternoon her daughter returned from a friend’s house. Flanders’ questions about the friend’s family went unanswered. She reportedly advised her daughter “to get all the details” the next time that she went to somebody’s house and then jotted the word down because it would be a good name for a magazine.

With a knack for mining prominent creatives and an appreciation for the inexperienced, she set out to find new designers and give other unknown talents a place to showcase their work. What started with 48 pages evolved into 300-page issues. Flanders looked at the magazine from a wider lens than fashion incorporating writers, photographers, musicians and designers. The first issue featured six pages of Cunningham’s photographs and over time his metier could take up as much as 100 pages. The pair first met when Cunningham, who was working for WWD at that time, dropped by Abracadabra.
Although Flanders and her team crafted a downtown cultural magazine, Details had various incarnations through the years. A controlling interest was sold in 1984 to avoid a potential bankruptcy. It was sold to investor Alan Patricof in 1988, who sold it to Condé Nast  year later for $2 million. Conde relaunched the title in 2000 but shuttered it completely in 2015.
After Details, Flanders relocated to the West Coast and switched tracks to work as a realtor. She also continued as a fairy godmother of sorts to creatives in fashion, art and music, continuing to entertain locals and New York City transplants and visitors in her high-rise home.
Flanders would want to be remembered for “championing independent talent and not just fashion but artists and other creatives and even individual style maskers what we would call ‘influencers’ today. She made things happen and she took pride in that. She took pride in connecting people abd creating events and parties where they could connect. And she celebrated the freaks. We all talk about that.” Apodaca said.
Flanders was predeceased by her husband as well as her brother Howard. She is survived by her daughter Rosie Edwards and husband Brendan.

Jeremy Scott’s 2003 Airplane Bag Reissued in Carpisa Collaboration

Jeremy Scott’s 2003 Airplane Bag Reissued in Carpisa Collaboration

MILAN — A serial collaborator who has scooped up partnerships with Adidas, Longchamp and Melissa, among others, Jeremy Scott has now lent his pop-tinged, playful creativity to luggage maker Carpisa.“I apply my creativity to canvases whether it’s luggage, couture, strollers, carts.…I just want to inspire and excite people,” Scott said at a press preview in Milan on Tuesday. “I was excited about the idea of bringing my creativity to luggage and travel.…If you’re someone that has a really strong personality and style, but then your suitcase is boring it’s like [plays epic fail sound],” he noted.
The designer developed a two-drop collection for the brand, part of the Gruppo Pianoforte, which also owns innerwear label Yamamay. The first range lands in Carpisa’s stores on March 4 and online on Wednesday and comprises shopping bags, crossbodies, backpacks and weekend bags, as well as smaller accessories covered in images of classical sculptures ravaged with colorful paint, in a nod to graffiti art.

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The second drop slated for April 5 dons cartoon-like airplane prints over a baby blue background.
“I had to do something,” Scott said with a chuckle when asked if the collection was a four-handed effort. “I was thinking about Italy and having fun with the culture and arts of the country with a playful touch,” he said.
All items across the two drops are crafted from an RPET recycled fabric similar to nylon in sync with the company’s sustainable bent, which Scott credited entirely to the luggage maker’s team. A three-piece travel set of trolleys is also made sustainably using a mix of 70 percent recycled materials.
The collection is completed by an airship-shaped crossbody bag, which nods to a similar style the American designer unveiled on the catwalk in 2003 for his namesake brand and that was produced in a limited run of eight to 10 pieces at the time. “It’s good to see it manufactured with great quality and accessible after many years,” Scott offered.

Jeremy Scott fronts campaign imagery for his capsule collection with Carpisa.
Courtesy of Carpisa

Tapping Scott as a collaborator was all but fortuitous. The U.S. is a target market for Carpisa, which is actively monitoring the country, seeking a local partner to develop its footprint. “As of now we’re hoping U.S. tourists will come back to the country leaving it with a Carpisa luggage in their hands,” said Gianluigi Cimmino, chief executive officer of Carpisa and Yamamay.
The company’s e-commerce is global, thus opening to international customers, including Americans, but expanding its physical retail presence is high on the executive’s agenda. “Data shows U.S. customers are interested in our products, they do buy in-store while in Italy especially in tourist destinations including Florence,” he said.

Scott appears in campaign imagery for the capsule and Cimmino confessed he couldn’t think of a better front man. “He is a pop and style icon, he represents everything we stand for, he’s also championed democratic fashion,” said the CEO.

Naomi Campbell Will Join Vogue’s Virtual Forces of Fashion Summit

Naomi Campbell Will Join Vogue’s Virtual Forces of Fashion Summit

The excitement is mounting for this year’s first-ever virtual and global iteration of the Vogue Forces of Fashion summit—and as if the event wasn’t major enough already, the iconic supermodel Naomi Campbell has also signed on to participate. On November 16 and 17, industry giants and Vogue editors will join together digitally to discuss topics such as racial equality, social justice, sustainability, and the future of the industry. The lineup of speakers includes Lizzo, who will be in conversation with designer Jeremy Scott, along with Virgil Abloh, Victoria Beckham, and Alexander McQueen creative director Sarah Burton. Also participating this year will be Alber Elbaz of AZ Fashion, creative director Craig Green, Bottega Veneta creative director Daniel Lee, photographer Ethan James Green, Loewe creative director and founder of JW Anderson Jonathan Anderson, and writer and director Reggie Yates.
Campbell’s panel will be hosted by a yet-to-be-announced special guest, but the discussion promises to be one of epic—or shall we say, super—proportions, with Campbell talking about her stellar career and political activism. The two-day event schedule will include opening remarks from Vogue editor in chief Anna Wintour, along with keynote sessions with Campbell, Abloh, Lizzo, and other industry leaders. Other components to this year’s virtual schedule include live Q&As with Vogue editors, networking sessions, and virtual drop-ins from surprise guests as well as a morning wellness session and happy hour on the second and final day.
More details and tickets are available on the Forces of Fashion website. Check back for updates ahead of the event, which will take place on November 16 and 17.
Vogue’s 2020 Forces of Fashion is presented by Jeep Wagoneer.
Read Next: The Vogue Fashion Prize is Back! Powered by NEOM and Bigger Than Ever
Originally published on Vogue.com

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