High Jewelry

Francesca Amfitheatrof on Louis Vuitton’s New High Jewelry Collection Revealed in Marrakech

Francesca Amfitheatrof on Louis Vuitton’s New High Jewelry Collection Revealed in Marrakech

Louis Vuitton’s new high jewelry collection is an ode to dragons, the phoenix, and equally fierce women.
Radiance necklace in yellow gold and platinum with garnet and diamonds, dress, Louis Vuitton. Photo: Paul Morel. Vogue Arabia, September 2022
It was one of those evenings that seemed to jump straight out of a book that opens with the words “Once upon a time…” Amid candlelight and men holding torches, Louis Vuitton presented Spirit, the maison’s latest high jewelry collection by Francesca Amfitheatrof, in Marrakech’s Dar el Bacha museum, previously the home of Pasha Thami El Glaoui. Spanning 125 spectacular pieces, this is the fourth collection by the artistic director of the fashion house’s Watches and Jewelry division, and it displayed a maturity and confidence in her designs, and the power of creating a recognizable DNA that is assertive, yet discreet.
Francesca Amfitheatrof
Confidence was set through a theme that “invokes liberty, strength, and the notion of infinity, but also the ideas of destiny and of soaring to new heights,” explains Amfitheatrof, who shares that she considers herself “a free spirit.” There are also references from mythology, around fantastical creatures such as phoenixes and dragons, infusing the pieces with power. “I wanted to do animals from the minute I started working for Louis Vuitton, but not in a figurative way, as we are not that kind of house.”
Radiance earrings in yellow and white gold with diamonds, Infinity necklace and rings (left hand) in yellow and white gold with diamonds, (right hand) Destiny ring in platinum and yellow gold, coat, Louis Vuitton. Photo: Paul Morel. Vogue Arabia, September 2022
When chatting in a private room of the palatial Royal Mansour hotel, Amfitheatrof, who joined the brand in 2018, seems pleased when we notice a change in the design identity, now relying less on obvious references. “To me that is very important,” she says. “My challenge is that we are a logo-focused brand, but I wanted to create a design repertoire that you can recognize. When somebody walks in and you’re like, ‘Okay, that’s Vuitton.’ I also feel that with jewelry, you can’t just brand it and that’s enough. We have done things like creating a unique diamond cut, and that is really amazing.” Amfitheatrof also mentions that there are other elements that will continue to enrich her design vocabulary, such as the mixture of different colored golds, the triangle and the arrow, and the idea of going forward.
The Grace necklace, with a breathtaking 65.26ct tsavorite from East Africa suspended by two phoenix wings
From the first 80 pieces presented in Morocco (more pieces will be added at a later stage in Paris), there are two designs that especially caught our attention. Appearing like delicate armor – or dragon scales in gold and platinum – the Radiance necklace is intended to act as protection for a woman, flaunting a 10.99ct mandarin garnet in bright orange. In the Grace necklace, a breathtaking 65.26ct tsavorite from East Africa is suspended by two phoenix wings that unfold around the neck, as a metaphor for the Louis Vuitton woman’s capacity for renewal. This piece took jewelers more than 2,000 hours to craft.
Liberty earrings, necklace, and rings in white gold with sapphires, emeralds, and diamonds, top, Louis Vuitton. Photo: Paul Morel. Vogue Arabia, September 2022
Observing the collection, it is undeniable that Louis Vuitton is betting strong on high jewelry, and the brand has broken through the preconceived idea that a fashion label doesn’t possess the know-how to produce jewelry. As we all know, high jewelry, along with couture, is one of the most conservative of French métiers. But on the contrary, Amfitheatrof, who previously worked four years for Tiffany & Co. as the brand’s firstever female design director, believes that the mass appeal of Louis Vuitton plays in her favor. “When you go to buy jewelry, you need to be in a certain type of mood. We have an amazing flow of people in our stores, so even if jewelry was not what you wanted to buy, you will be exposed to it. We also have incredibly affluent clients that already love the brand, and that we’re attracting into the high jewelry world by showing what we do. And there’s no question that today we work with the best and most impressive stones and materials,” concludes Amfitheatrof. “But of course, when I started, people were curious and were asking, ‘Who is this girl, she is not even French.’ When they saw the work, they started to change their mind, and they understood that we are very committed, we have the best team and materials, and everything that Louis Vuitton does is at the highest level.”
Grace earrings, necklace, and rings in white gold with diamonds and tsavorite, dress, Louis Vuitton. Photo: Paul Morel. Vogue Arabia, September 2022
Destiny earrings and ring in platinum and yellow gold with rubies and diamonds, Infinity bracelet with white and yellow gold with diamonds, dress, Louis Vuitton. Photo: Paul Morel. Vogue Arabia, September 2022
Grace earrings in white gold with diamonds, Liberty pendant in white gold with diamonds, Liberty bracelet in white gold with emerald and diamonds, Destiny ring in white gold with diamonds, dress, shirt, Louis Vuitton. Photo: Paul Morel. Vogue Arabia, September 2022
Originally published in the September 2022 issue of Vogue Arabia
Style: Elena Psalti @elena_psaltiSet design: NineSeven1 MediaProduction: Danica Zivkovic Local production: Michaël Lacomblez at Louis2 Hair: Christoph Hasenbein at Wise & Talented Makeup: Eny Whitehead at Callisté Manicure: Hanaé Goumri at The Wall GroupPhotography assistant: Julien DauvillierStyle assistant: Maxime BardetSet design assistants: Mallory McLane, Carol Vobin Model: Aicha Hammam at Skins Models 
Read Next: In Marrakech, Kylie Minogue, Chloë Grace Moretz, and More Celebrate Louis Vuitton’s New High Jewelry Launch

Discover Bulgari’s Tribute to Timeless Nature with its High Jewelry Collection: ‘Eden: The Garden of Wonders’

Discover Bulgari’s Tribute to Timeless Nature with its High Jewelry Collection: ‘Eden: The Garden of Wonders’

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With impeccable craftsmanship, an unparalleled sense of creativity, and timeless creations Italian jewelry house Bulgari has now launched a state-of-the-art high jewelry collection, ‘Eden: The Garden of Wonders’. Imagined by the creative mastermind Lucia Silvestri, the collection features an assortment of over 140 opulent creations, all inspired by the infamous treasures of nature which are now immortalized in rare timepieces by the brand. As nature is gearing up to be the next big trend, Bulgari captures the diverse spirit of the earth and presents it in a showcase of sparkling emeralds sourced from the mining depths of Colombia and Zambia.
Earrings in platinum and diamonds, transformable necklace in white gold with emeralds and diamonds, (right hand) Emerald Ode ring in platinum with emerald and diamonds, (left hand), cocktail ring in platinum with emerald and diamonds, bracelet in white gold with brilliant emeralds and diamonds, Bulgari. Dress, Alexandre Vauthier. Photo: Julian Torres
While each piece from the collection radiates a unique beauty of its own, one that stands out for its dramatic glamor and unrivaled charm is the Emerald Glory necklace, a true hallmark for Bulgari in high jewelry. Embellished with 11-pear-shaped emeralds extracted from enormous stones, this piece brings forth a sense of mesmerizing nature that’s never been envisioned before.
Earrings in white gold with diamonds, (right hand) Serpenti watch in white gold with diamonds, emeralds, sapphires, rubies, and tourmalines, (left hand) Serpenti watch in white gold with diamonds, tourmaline, spessartites, and sapphires, ring in platinum with diamonds, Bulgari. Top, pants, Daname. Photo: Julian Torres
In an effort to bring majestic aquatic events to life, Bulgari also launches the Serpenti Ocean Treasure set – one that is not to be overlooked. By redefining the transformation of the mesmerizing sea animal, Bulgari exhibits a symbol of infinite innovation and endless creativity in this sapphire embellished piece. Paying tribute to Queen Elizabeth II’s platinum jubilee, the brand has also created a magnificent Jubilee Emerald Garden Tiara. Other iconic pieces include the Colors of Eden, featuring seven vibrant colors all set to take you down an invigorating journey of lights.
Through this collection, Bulgari has stepped outside the ordinary and brought bold colors and glittering diamonds together in a dynamic setting, hoping to immortalize the bounds of nature. Fashion icons including Anne Hathaway and Zendaya have also been seen sparkling in the jewelry house’s latest offerings, which tell a special story one piece at a time.
Drop earrings in white gold with tanzanite and diamonds, Serpenti Ocean Treasure necklace and bracelet in platinum with diamonds, (left hand) Serpenti ring in platinum with diamonds, (right hand) cocktail ring in platinum with sapphire and diamonds, Bulgari. Top, pants, Maison Rabih Kayrouz. Photo: Julian Torres
Grapes of Eden earrings in pink gold with tanzanites, rubellites, amethysts, and diamonds, Bulgari. Dress, Ashi Studio. Photo: Julian Torres
Emerald bud earrings, Tribute to Paris necklace, and Emerald gift ring, in platinum with emeralds and diamonds, Bulgari. Dress, Giambattista Valli. Photo: Julian Torres
Monette Eden goddess earrings and necklace in yellow gold with silver coin and diamonds, Cocktail bouquet ring in yellow gold with peridot, yellow sapphires, and diamonds, Serpenti Tubogas 8 twist gold watch with diamonds, Bulgari. Dress, Alexander McQueen. Photo: Julian Torres
Photography: Julian TorresStyle: Anna KleinMakeup: Aurelia LiansbergHair: AnneSofie BegtrupNails: Huberte CesarionProduction: Danica ZivkovicOn-set producer: Julia IbatullinaModel: Nour RizkVideo: F2MaxDOP: Paul Hattfield Directing: Maxim Sapozhnikov 
Read next: Bvlgari Continues Celebrating Italian and Middle Eastern Cultural Bonds With its New Ramadan Campaign

In Marrakech, Kylie Minogue, Chloë Grace Moretz, and More Celebrate Louis Vuitton’s New High Jewelry Launch

In Marrakech, Kylie Minogue, Chloë Grace Moretz, and More Celebrate Louis Vuitton’s New High Jewelry Launch

Kylie Minogue and Francesca Amfitheatrof. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Marrakech was the place to be earlier this week when Louis Vuitton presented its new high jewelry collection. Titled ‘Spirit’, the 125-piece collection designed by the maison’s jewelry and watches artistic director Francesca Amfitheatrof celebrates humanity’s incredible capacity for innovation and the mythology around fantastical creatures with a 21st century lens.
Cate Blanchett for Louis Vuitton. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
For its launch, a star-studded intimate dinner was hosted at the Dar El Bacha, with the guest list including Grammy-winning Australian singer Kylie Minogue, Vogue Arabia editor-in-chief Manuel Arnaut, actors Chloë Grace Moretz and Riley Keough, models Anna Ewers and Sasha Pivovarova, as well as digital influencers and editors. Dressed in edgy pieces from the French fashion house, the attendees also viewed the collection up close, which recently named Academy Award-winning actor Cate Blanchett as its brand ambassador.
Photo: Laziz Hamani. Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
“Like a phoenix rising from the ashes to take flight, or a dragon breathing protective fire, the Louis Vuitton woman exudes amazing strength, energy and optimism,” says Amfitheatrof of the collection. “It is that very femininity – so emancipating and emblematic of the maison – that I wanted to embody in Spirit.” The collection is accommodated across five distinct universes, with each reflecting Louis Vuitton’s house codes: Liberty, Grace, Fantasy, Radiance, and Destiny. Also worth noting is the collection’s size, as at 125 pieces, it makes it the brand’s largest ever jewelry release, and has taken over 40,000 hours of work in the Parisian ateliers.

Below, check out all the pictures from the event at Dar El Bacha, Marrakech.
Chloë Grace Moretz. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Kylie Minogue. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Francesca Amfitheatrof. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Riley Keough. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Anna Ewers. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Sasha Pivarova. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Carine Roitfeld. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Bryan Boy. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Sharon Alexie. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Read Next: Gucci’s Hortus Deliciarum Jewelry Collection Is a Dazzling Course in Roman History

The 12 Most Interesting Jewelry Trends Spotted on the Runway This Season

The 12 Most Interesting Jewelry Trends Spotted on the Runway This Season

Unlike clothing and accessories, jewelry has little protective functionality, amulets aside. Bracelets and jeweled barrettes might not be able to keep out the cold, but a pretty bauble can certainly warm the heart. Beyond their intrinsic value, there’s a strong emotional aspect to these small and special adornments.
While every season has its jewelry trends, it generally takes a long while for specific pieces to feel dated—especially these days when designers are referencing many past decades all at once. Elsa Peretti and Nancy Cunard might have been the spiritual muses of the many silver and stacked bracelets we saw, but the pieces themselves looked modern.
Gobstopper-sized pearls, once a symbol of 1980s muchness, returned with a sense of fun. Speaking of amusement, instead of swinging on chandeliers, why not wrap crystals drop around your neck? Alternatively you might let the fringe fly from lobes and wrists. Fall’s tendency is toward big statements, but there were lots of niche motifs like locks and keys, flowers, and fauna. Ear-shaped earrings, mouth-shaped pins, and other body-inspired pieces offered an ersatz anatomy lesson. Several designers showed their smarts in terms of sustainability by making treasures from found objects, a reminder that beauty is everywhere to be found.
Off the Cuff
When it comes to bracelets, more is more is more and bigger is better.
Rick Owens
Saint Laurent
Alexander McQueen
Crystal Visions
Adorn yourself in crystal drops and outshine the chandelier.
Miu Miu
Off-White
Carolina Herrera
Gobstoppers
Pearls the size of Jaw Busters are more statement-making than sweet.
Versace
Dolce & Gabbana
Givenchy
Anatomy Lessons
Eyes, lips, and ears make for witty, conversation-starting baubles.
Schiaparelli
Raf Simons
Proenza Schouler
Major Statements
When it comes to large-scale earrings, sometimes one is enough.
Mossi
Rave
Courreges
Lock and Key
Jewelry this charming opens all doors.
Balmain
Fendi
Moschino
Fringe Elements
Get into the swing of the season with pieces that move along with you.
Andreas Kronthaler for Vivienne Westwood
JW Anderson
Valentino
Bricolage
DIY goes deluxe.

Central St Martins
Ahead of the Curve
Arcs take the place of circles when it comes to earrings and chokers.

Stella McCartney
Head Starts
Fall’s crowning glories come in the form of ornamented clips and crowns.

Christian Dior
Gilding the Lily
Designers offer a pretty bouquet of floral motifs for fall.

Loewe
Noah’s Ark
These low maintenance pets deliver maximum joy.
Puppets & Puppets
Dries Van Noten
Chanel
Originally published in Vogue.com

Chanel Unveils a Celestial Masterpiece to Celebrate 90 Years Since Coco’s First (and Only) High Jewelry Collection

Chanel Unveils a Celestial Masterpiece to Celebrate 90 Years Since Coco’s First (and Only) High Jewelry Collection

Coco Chanel. Photo: Getty
Today, Chanel unveils a glimpse of its new high jewelry collection for 2022, and it’s one that quite literally reaches for the stars. The centrepiece of the 1932 collection, which celebrates 90 years since Bijoux De Diamants, its founder’s historic and one and only high jewelry collection, is the Allure Céleste. This magnificently modern sapphire and diamond necklace was inspired by the same celestial theme that spurred Gabrielle Chanel’s own creations. “I wanted to cover women in constellations,” said the designer when her collection was unveiled at her private apartment at 29 rue du Faubourg de Saint-Honoré, on November 5, 1932.
The Allure Céleste is the starry centrepiece of the 1932 collection. It can be worn in a number of ways including as a short necklace, three brooches and as a bracelet.
Patrice Leguéreau, director of the Chanel jewelry creation studio today, says he wanted 1932, which will launch fully in May, to pay homage to the audacity and wearability of Coco’s Bijoux de Diamants – which eschewed clasps and fuss in favor of bold, transformable pieces in a palette of diamonds and platinum – and at the same time move the conversation forward. “I wanted to create a different vision of this legacy, by setting these celestial elements in motion,” he explains.
In the Allure Céleste, the movement and light that emanates from the night sky is captured in shimmering halos of diamonds that radiate out from each motif. A crescent moon cradles a 55.55 carat (naturellement, five being Coco’s favorite number), intense blue sapphire, while a comet centres on an 8.02 carat pear-shaped diamond, its fiery tail coming alive in gradated lines of diamonds in assorted cuts.
Coco Chanel pictured here in 1937. Photo: Getty
Coco herself was as renowned for her contradictions as she was for her style and her sharp wit. She once proclaimed she favored costume jewelry over fine jewelry, because she found it “disgraceful to walk around with millions of dollars around your neck, just because you are rich”. Under her direction in the 1920s, costume jewelry became no longer a mere imitation of the “real thing”. She helped establish it as an art form in its own right, whether in commissioning the magnificently opulent Maltese cross cuffs from her friend Duke Fulco di Verdura, or in her elegant tumbles of long pearl necklaces layered over a little black dress.
A shooting star necklace from Chanel’s 1932 Bijoux de Diamants collection.
She was prompted by the Great Depression however to revisit her thoughts around precious jewels. The Wall Street crash of 1929 had a calamitous effect on the entire world, as people and businesses found themselves in ruin. In typically bombastic style, her dislike of ostentation and high-value gems was turned on its head. “This aspect fades in times of financial crisis, when an instinctive need for authenticity in all matters returns, reducing an amusing bauble to its actual worth,” she said in the press kit for the Bijoux de Diamants collection. “If I have chosen diamonds, it is because they represent the greatest value in the smallest volume.”
The cover of Vogue Paris, January 1933, in which the collection was reviewed.
The collection was financed by the London Diamond Corporation, who hoped that Chanel’s creative talents might kickstart renewed energy in the market following several years in the doldrums. Their gamble paid off. Following the two-week exhibition, which was visited by the great and good of the Parisian creative scene, including Pablo Picasso, Gloria Swanson, Condé Nast and star dancers from the Ballets Russes, shares in the company rose and a new buzz around diamonds and precious jewelry was achieved. As Coco herself said, “Nothing could be better for forgetting the crisis than feasting one’s eyes on beautiful new things, which the skills of our craftsmen and women never cease to unveil.”
In customary fearless style, Chanel chose to display her creations on wax busts rather than on jewelers’ trays. With the help of friends including artist Paul Iribe, who designed the jewelry, the poet Jean Cocteau who wrote the collection manifesto, and Robert Bresson (later a celebrated film director), who photographed it, she created a unique collection that above all was focused on the female body and how jewelry should work to enhance it, not hinder it. “In a world that was deeply masculine, Gabrielle Chanel was a woman who designed for women. In her view jewelry should be an idea, not a status symbol of the men who bought it for the women in their lives,” says Marianne Etchebarne, Chanel’s global head of watches and fine jewelry product marketing, clients, and communication.
Robert Bresson’s images of the Bijoux de Diamants exhibition appeared in Vogue Paris, January 1933.
Just as she created fashion that offered women new freedom and flexibility in their clothes, a star brooch could be worn in the hair or on a lapel. A comet caressed the neck, its tail of diamonds flattering the wearer’s décolletage. She focused on the motifs that made up her world, from supple couture ribbons of diamonds to the mosaic floors of the Aubazine abbey where she was raised that detailed the sun, the moon and five-point stars.  “It caused a sensation at the time and still today it remains the cornerstone of our jewelry designs,” says Etchebarne.
“My stars! How could anything be more becoming or more eternally modern?” Gabrielle Chanel.
But the collection was not without controversy. Paris’s traditional jewelry houses were outraged that a mere couturière — a dressmaker —  and a woman to boot, had been tasked with creating a high jewelry collection in the hope of reinvigorating the diamond market, and they demanded that the corporation close the project down. The corporation persisted but its plans to bring Bijoux de Diamants to London never materialized, and most of the pieces were broken up, never to be seen again. Little did those Parisian jewelers know that the collection’s legacy – and Coco’s vision – would live on, and still be inspiring the world today.
Read Next: 9 Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel Quotes to Live By
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

“Pretty Woman Holds a Special Place for Me”: Emma Roberts on Launching the Film’s Namesake High Jewelry Collection By Fred

“Pretty Woman Holds a Special Place for Me”: Emma Roberts on Launching the Film’s Namesake High Jewelry Collection By Fred

As Fred opens its first boutique in the UAE, actor Emma Roberts launches its Pretty Woman jewelry campaign with heart and head.
Emma Roberts wearing Pretty Woman Glamorous Earring, Unconditional Ring, and Glamorous Necklace. Photo: Courtesy of Fred
The French have the expression “Il pleut des cordes” to describe a downpour. Meanwhile, Americans would remark, “it’s raining cats and dogs.” It was one such night in Paris for a dinner hosted by actor Emma Roberts and French high jewelry brand Fred in the courtyard of the Michelin starred restaurant Apicius. Under such dreary climes, both the sparkle of jewelry and a high-wattage smile can transform the evening into a bright soiree.
A welcoming demeanor as embodied by Roberts colored the evening, as did the high jewelry necklace of white diamonds and rubellites set as hearts within hearts forming a necklace around her neck. “I felt very glamorous,” remarks Roberts the following day. Petite, the star is dressed in a chic black suit and sitting in a suite at Hôtel de Crillon. Her blonde hair is loose to her shoulders and her red mouth offers a spot-on resemblance to her aunt Julia Roberts. “It was special because I haven’t traveled abroad since before the pandemic. So, to be a new mom, be in Paris, and have a night out surrounded by such great personalities – and I brought my best friend with me as my date – the jewelry was the cherry on top.”
If cheerful, warm, and curious are a few of the qualities Roberts embodies, the star of the Fred Jewelry Pretty Woman campaign and niece of the Pretty Woman of cinema is also a successful actor. Her debut role was as the daughter of Johnny Depp’s character in Blow (2001), when she was nine. Later roles would see her thrive in the satirical horror genre with the likes of Scream 4 (2011) and the TV series Scream Queens, but also romantic comedy with a leading role in Holidate, which came out last year.
Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman. Photo: Courtesy of Fred
For the time being, Roberts is enthused about her role as the face of a high jewelry campaign. “They approached me mentioning they were doing a Pretty Woman collection and obviously Pretty Woman holds a special place for me, as well as being such an iconic movie. I was immediately honored that they asked me – being an American girl to be approached by such a gorgeous, luxury French jewelry brand is, well… It makes the day much better,” she says, laughing in a sing-song voice. “I was just so honored, I said yes, immediately.” Pointing to the campaign posters, Roberts notes that she was seven months pregnant at the time of the shoot, with her now one-year-old son, Rhodes. She wears earrings that dangle with diamonds to drop hearts; a diamond and rubellite ring; and a sautoir necklace with a graphic heart larger than her wide green eyes, fully encrusted with diamonds. There are also delicate pieces that can be layered, and their various gold colors mixed and matched.
While vice president and artistic director Valérie Samuel oversees the jewelry creations today, the house was founded by her grandfather Fred Samuel in 1936, who engraved the words “Creative Modern Jeweller” on his first business cards. Born in Argentina in 1908, Samuel first developed his passion for cultured pearls and later explored colored stones, ultimately being commissioned by the king and queen of Nepal to create jewelry to match the court saris. His quest for color and light remains a pillar of the house. The jewels have seduced Marlene Dietrich, Barbara Hutton, and Princess Grace of Monaco and the maison has collaborated with artists Jean Cocteau and Bernard Buffet. Recently, Fred expanded to the UAE, with a boutique opening in the Dubai Mall.
Fred Samuel, the founder of Fred Jewelry. Photo: Courtesy of Fred
“The history of Fred is so beautiful and fascinating – it’s a family-owned business. You can feel how organic the brand is,” nods Roberts. “There are these high-end luxurious pieces and these great dainty pieces that are more affordable and that you can wear every day. To have a maison that can do both is unique and it speaks to me. When I’m not on the red carpet having to give back the jewelry to the security guards at midnight, I still want to wear the brand, in my everyday life, as a mom, with jeans.”
Photo: Courtesy of Fred
Roberts reveals that she feels beautiful when she is settled and carefree. “To me, the prettiest woman in the world is never the most done up and looking for attention; it’s always the one who is comfortable and happy.” When Roberts is à l’aise, don’t be surprised to see a book in her hand. She is exceptionally well-read and even launched an online book club called Belletrist in 2017, which has 265 000 followers on Instagram – Roberts’s own feed has 17 million. “I was homeschooled, and I had to work harder on my own time to catch up with what everyone was doing at school. Often, it was me and a tutor or me and my mom and a pile of books. I made books my best friend because I wouldn’t have gotten through high school otherwise,” she remembers. “I would go out of my way to find books I loved and that kept my morale up. With the job I do, if I have downtime on set, I try to read and not be on my phone. When I was doing American Horror Story: Coven, I read Steven King and became obsessed with that.”
Pretty Woman Glamorous Brooch. Photo: Courtesy of Fred
When traveling, Roberts’s first stop when shopping is always a bookstore. In Paris, she is sure to visit WHSmith and Shakespeare and Co., where she purchased W-3: A Memoir by Bette Howland, and she always picks up a tote as a memento. Jewelry souvenirs also hold a special place in her heart. For her mother’s recent birthday, Roberts found a vintage tennis charm from 1916 to gift her. For her own 30th birthday in February this year, her mother gave her a diamond band. “I remember seeing her wear it when I was younger and thinking it was so sparkly,” Roberts recalls. “It was a ring my father gave her when she had me. It was so meaningful and unexpected. I was just taken aback that she thought to do that.” Perhaps 30 years from now, Roberts will gift a member of her family a high jewelry keepsake, one from this trip from Paris marked by this very pretty woman who will decide for herself.
Read Next: How Julia Roberts Plans to Bring Joy into Her Life This Year
Originally published in the December 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia

This Saudi High Jewelry Brand Has Something for Every Occasion

This Saudi High Jewelry Brand Has Something for Every Occasion

Lusso bracelets with diamonds in gold, Lusso rings with diamonds in gold, Lusso earring with diamonds in gold, Lustro; dress, Mashael Al-Faris. Photographed by Ali Sharaf
Since being founded in 2008, Lustro has quickly made a name for itself in the regional high jewelry world. Meticulously designed, the Saudi-founded brand’s nine collections promise something for everyone and every occasion.
Stellarosa necklace with diamonds in gold, Stellarosa bracelet with diamonds in gold, Stellarosa rings with diamonds in gold, Stellarosa earrings with diamonds in gold, Lustro; dress, M Gallery. Photographed by Ali Sharaf
For those looking to stand out, the Stellarosa collection features a “super cut” that creates a unique, enhanced reflection on the diamonds. The array of curved diamonds on each piece of jewelry makes it a must for the trendsetter. The latest Coda Di Leone collection, with six different colored stones, is marked with a lion’s tail to symbolize nature and power. Rose gold, diamonds, and malachite are just some of the key elements of this dynamic collection. Meanwhile, Lancia represents confidence and strength for the modern woman, and the Lust collection with its rose gold hues complementing diamonds will speak to your femininity. A collection you can’t go wrong with is the Sera, which is Lustro’s most sought-after one. Also noteworthy are Bling and Lusso, which combine contemporary twists with masterful craftsmanship, and the Bridal and High Jewelry collections for the most special occasions. The Bridal collection offers handcrafted, one-of-a-kind pieces for every bride, while the High Jewelry collection incorporates solitaires and gemstones to create bold pieces that are bound to turn heads.
Coda di Leone necklaces with diamonds and malachite, Coda di Leone bracelets with diamond and malachite, Coda di Leone rings with diamonds and malachite, Coda di Leone earrings with diamond and malachite, Lustro; jumpsuit, Plenty SA. Photography Ali Sharaf
The label aims to revolutionize the traditional concept of jewelry designs and customer service through its unique pieces with sparkling diamonds. To that end, every Lustro boutique offers a tailor-made experience for its clients, while rigorous processes are undertaken by experts to ensure that each diamond is clear, colorless, and of high quality. Up next, the label plans on delivering its handcrafted customer experience internationally with branches in London, Kuwait, and Dubai.
Coda di Leone necklaces with diamonds and malachite, Coda di Leone bracelets with diamond and malachite, Coda di Leone rings with diamonds and malachite, Coda di Leone earrings with diamond and malachite, Lustro; jumpsuit, Plenty SA. Photographed by Ali Sharaf
Read Next: This is the Emerging Saudi Designer Worn By Halsey in Her Upcoming Film
Style: Nouf MallawiHair: Guncha AtdyyevaMakeup: Hessa AlajajiModel: Samira Alkhamis

Why Cartier’s Latest High Jewelry Collection Will Appeal to Your Sixth Sense

Why Cartier’s Latest High Jewelry Collection Will Appeal to Your Sixth Sense

Tigre Cascade necklace in white gold with obsidian, emerald, onyx, and diamonds, Tigre Cascade ring in white gold with obsidian, emerald, onyx, and diamonds, Cartier; dress, Taller Marmo; shoes, Jimmy Choo; hat, scarf, stylist’s own. Photographed by Nima Benati
In an adept balancing act between the future and the past, Cartier‘s Sixième Sens high jewelry collection has reimagined iconic house styles in new techniques. Aiming to appeal to your sixth sense, the collection of necklaces and rings combines vivid 1,000-year-old stones in unusual textures and colors, and features geometric ornamentations, contrasting textures, and other visual patterns that exhibit optical illusions.
Alaxoa earrings in platinum with emeralds, emerald beads, and diamonds, Alaxoa necklace in platinum with emeralds, emerald beads, and diamonds, Cartier; dress, Blumarine; hat, Bonfilio; gloves, scarf, stylist’s own. Photographed by Nima Benati
The Meride necklace in diamond, onyx, and rock crystal creates a hypnotic checkerboard pattern, while the Alaxoa necklace’s emerald beads and diamonds are carefully arranged to caress the skin. Meanwhile, the Parhelia ring is a nod to Cartier’s classic peacock motif with a 21.51ct sapphire cabochon surrounded by five semi-circles of radiant diamonds and emeralds that fan out from each side of the center stone. It can also be worn as a brooch, enabling quick multifunctionality. A touch of black lacquer creates shadow effects to reinforce the impression of movement in the ring.
Pixelage necklace in yellow gold with topaz, onyx, and yellow, orange, and white diamonds, Cartier; dress, Michael Kors Collection; scarf, stylist’s own. Photographed by Nima Benati
Described by Cartier as a “stylized play on the feline’s coat,” the Pixelage necklace, true to its name, reflects another consistent theme in the collection: pixelation. Adopting digital imagery as a new way to interpret the classic house motif of a panther’s fur, the spots on the piece are created in a puzzle of polished topaz, onyx, and white and colored diamonds.
Sharkara necklace in white gold with pink tourmalines, sapphires, and diamonds, Cartier; dress, Taller Marmo; gloves, stylist’s own. Photographed by Nima Benati
With variations of the same tone unlike most of the other pieces of the collection, the Sharkara necklace brings together tourmalines and colored sapphires in rosy hues, illuminated by bright orange garnets and diamonds and balancing a geometry of straight lines, curves, squares, and spheres. The collection also celebrates the diamond with the Coruscant necklace, which features six different cuts (kite, octagonal, emerald, triangle, baguette, and brilliant), each reflecting light from a different angle. Three stones stand out from the rest: a 3ct kite, a 1.62ct octagon, and a 1.54ct emerald-shaped diamond.
Udyana necklace in platinum with rubies, emeralds, sapphires, and diamonds, Cartier; coat, A. Teodoro; hat, Bonfilio; scarf, stylist’s own. Photographed by Nima Benati
After a long absence of in-person presentations, Cartier unveiled the high jewelry collection at an exclusive event in Lake Como, Italy. Attending guests included Egyptian actor Yasmine Sabri, Lebanese actor Nadine Labaki, and Saudi filmmaker Fatima Al Banawi.
Read Next: Meet the Designer Behind the Iconic Cartier Watches Loved by Bella Hadid and Princess Diana
Style: Gaia Fraschini Makeup: Greta Agazzi Production: Danica ZivkovicSenior fashion market editor: Amine Jreissati Model: Rawdah Mohamed Style assistant: Greta TedeschiPhotography assistants: Luca Trelancia, Massimo Fusardi

Nature Key Inspiration for Gucci’s Second High Jewelry Collection

Nature Key Inspiration for Gucci’s Second High Jewelry Collection

MILAN — Nature continues to be a boundless source of inspiration for Gucci’s creative director Alessandro Michele.
The Florence-based house is presenting its second high jewelry collection, which Michele named Hortus Deliciarum, or “Garden of Delights,” from Latin to English.
The presentation will be staged at the mid-19th-century, neoclassical residence Villa Pallavicino in Stresa, Italy, June 20 to 26.
The collection reflects Michele’s iconography and aesthetics and is inspired by the ever-changing hues of the sky at different times of the day and its constellations.
Michele, as reported, shone the light on Gucci’s high jewelry designs also presenting his most recent collection, called “Aria,” in April. “Everything must return to life, not be closed in vaults. I have a great passion for jewelry, they are our families’ history and are never dead — just like the brand,” Michele told WWD at the time, as usual wearing elaborate rings on every finger.

Hortus Deliciarum comprises more than 130 designs, largely one-of-a-kind, and its motifs are divided into four chapters.

A necklace from Gucci’s high jewelry Hortus Deliciarum collection. 
courtesy image

The first chapter is an ode to the beauty of natural landscapes, miniaturizing waterfalls through a cascade of diamonds, for example. Michele worked with fringed and tasseled necklaces and chandelier earrings and violet and plum-colored spinels floating among dangling drops of diamonds, or Paraiba tourmalines used to evoke the bright azure of the ocean.

A sky at sunset is at the center of the second chapter with opals and topazes sitting alongside spessartite garnets and tourmalines on a Georgiana collet-set Rivière necklace with an 8-carat opal set with twilight-hued gemstones. Michele described this construction as “discordant symmetry,” slightly mismatched to channel the concept of sunset.
The third chapter hinges on a romantic rose garden, represented by rococo bows and sautoirs paying homage to the poetic universe of botanicals. Here, gems include a pinkish-orange Padparadscha sapphire, or the deep indigo of the indicolite tourmalines. Some necklaces are designed with detachable pendants to be worn as charms, but there are also several dazzling brooches.

A design from Gucci’s high jewelry Hortus Deliciarum collection. 
courtesy image

The fourth chapter revisits the staple animals dear to Michele, from the lion to the tiger. Sky-blue tanzanites recur throughout, clasped by roaring lion heads and paired with serpentine opals and verdant tsavorites. In one collier-style necklace, a 16.36-carat opal is surrounded by 22 leonine figures. The designer introduced yellow in the collection through the use of several beryls.
Each animal is also surrounded by flowers, leaves and stars in ornate diamond settings and hidden engravings.
Afghani mint tourmaline, sunset-pink rubellite, velvety violet tanzanites, light orange sapphires, blushed-rosé topaz and mandarin garnets shine on the striking solitaires. Unique stones include a spectacular 60-carat rubbelite, a heart-shaped mandarin garnet, and a 16-carat Paraiba tourmaline.

A design from Gucci’s high jewelry Hortus Deliciarum collection. 
courtesy image

In April, Gucci launched its first high watchmaking collection, made in Switzerland, as reported.
As part of the new high jewelry collection, the company will also present new timepieces. Lion heads rotate to reveal and conceal ocean-blue Australian opal dials on a range of dazzling diamond-laden bracelets, set with violet tanzanites and rainbows of peridots, pink tourmalines, rubbelites and mandarin garnets.

Crucifix watches nod to the Renaissance, embellished with pavé-set dials and star-spangled spinels. A bangle watch is imbued with 275 perpendicular Art Deco diamond baguettes, with a striking concealed turquoise dial.

Chanel Unveils a 55.55 Carat High Jewelry Necklace Celebrating 100 Years of its Iconic No 5 Scent

Chanel Unveils a 55.55 Carat High Jewelry Necklace Celebrating 100 Years of its Iconic No 5 Scent

As Chanel No 5 celebrates its centenary, an exceptional high jewelry necklace sees the light in a dazzling commemoration.
The 55.55 carat high jewelry necklace by Chanel. Photo: Courtesy
It took a full year to find a rough stone worthy of extolling Chanel’s most enduring talisman, the fragrance that helped build the feted maison and entrench the legend of Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel. The stone had to encompass all the virtues of Chanel No 5: it had to be flawless, eternal, and with just a frisson of mystery. Finally, a diamond was found. Not the biggest, most flamboyant one, but one that could be cut to obtain a perfect octagonal gem with a symbolic weight reflecting mademoiselle’s lucky number, to be used in a one-of-a-kind high jewelry necklace.
The making of the 55.55 necklace. Photo: Courtesy
Now, two years after Patrice Leguéreau, director of the Chanel Jewelry Creation Studio, initially dreamed up a No 5 anniversary necklace with a few pencil strokes on black tracing paper – made specially for Chanel, of course – the piece is finally being unveiled. And at its heart: the astonishing dazzler weighing in at a symbolic 55.55 carats.
This year, Chanel No 5 celebrates 100 years of being the world’s best-loved scent with an extraordinary feat of high jewelry design. The 55.55 necklace comprises a custom emerald cut, D Flawless quality stone set in 18ct white gold bezel with 104 round and 42 baguette diamonds. It is the pièce de résistance in the new Collection No 5; the first high jewelry collection dedicated to a Chanel perfume. With it, two creative worlds of Chanel – its evocative scents and beguiling jewelry – are chain-linked together.
A vintage Chanel ad. Photo: Courtesy
When it was launched in 1921 as the maison’s first foray in perfume, Chanel No 5 caused a sensation. Eschewing the fragrance codes of the time – that of elegant women only wearing cloying florals, encased in equally elaborate crystal bottles – No 5 offered a fresh, clean, and thoroughly modern perfume, in an “invisible” bottle. That it has been a consistent bestseller for a century, with a near-unchanged formula, is testament to Gabrielle Chanel’s singular vision.
“From the absolute modernity of the fragrance and the purity of the bottle to the mystery of the name, Chanel No 5 revolutionized the world of perfumery,” says Frédéric Grangié, Chanel Watches and Fine Jewelry president. “In 1932, Gabrielle Chanel revolutionized another universe: that of French high jewelry, with her one and only collection in platinum and diamonds, Bijoux de Diamants, which heralded new ways of wearing jewels.” To wit, proposing elaborate pieces that were transformable; a symbol of the emancipated woman not constrained by conformity. “It’s this shared history, imbued with audacity and vision, that we wanted to embody through this new high jewelry collection,” he states.
The making of the 55.55 necklace. Photo: Courtesy
The necklace showcases all the facets of the prized perfume, with no detail overlooked or accidental. The center stone echoes the silhouette of the No 5 bottle, the clasp is in the shape of Coco Chanel’s lucky number five, and each pear-shaped diamond, different in size, was cut and adjusted one by one to “symbolize the concentrated bouquet of the collection,” Grangié explains. “It was born from an act of pure creation.” The new collection is also the largest high jewelry offering from the maison, with its 123 pieces expressing all the dimensions of Chanel No 5. The tonalities embodied by the gemstones represent the colors of the perfume, in varying shades of yellow, amber, and pink. “Everything Gabrielle Chanel bequeathed to us still resonates today,” Grangié shares. “We remain faithful to our history, but we are also attentive to enriching it and projecting it in the future with the greatest creative freedom. What’s important is creation itself, which lies at the center of everything. Everything always starts from the design, from the idea of a piece of jewelry and the woman who will wear it.”
While Chanel pieces are made to be worn – their originator famously freed women from the sartorial constraints of the time – the 55.55 necklace will take pride of place at the maison’s Patrimoine at 18 Place Vendôme, Paris, and will not be sold. There, it will shine as an eternal embrace between the spirit of No 5 and its exceptional jewelry making.
Read Next: Marion Cotillard on Becoming the New Face of the Iconic Chanel No.5
Originally published in the March 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia

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