Health Conditions / Oral Health

Some Colgate Products Have Been Recalled After Being Improperly Stored

Some Colgate Products Have Been Recalled After Being Improperly Stored

Six different Colgate products sold at Family Dollar stores are being voluntarily recalled because they weren’t stored properly, according to a statement from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The products were shipped to stores in 11 states from May 1 to June 21 this year. No illnesses related to the recalled products have been reported yet.The following Colgate products were affected:Colgate Optic White Stain Prevention Toothpaste, 2.1 ouncesColgate Optic White Charcoal Toothpaste, 4.2 ouncesColgate Optic White High Impact Toothpaste, 3 ouncesColgate Optic White Toothpaste Icy Fresh, 3.2 ouncesColgate Optic White Stain Fighter Toothpaste Clean Mint, 4.2 ouncesColgate Optic White Mouthwash, 16 fluid ouncesThe products were sold at Family Dollar stores in the following states:ArizonaCaliforniaGeorgiaIdahoIndianaMontanaNew MexicoNevadaOregonTexasUtahEmployees at the affected Family Dollar stores have been notified and asked to isolate and remove the recalled products from shelves immediately. If you purchased one of the recalled items, you can return it to the Family Dollar where you bought it and you don’t need the receipt to do so, the FDA statement said. Given that employees are being asked to separate the recalled products and dispose of them, you may want to put the product in some kind of container (like a bag) before disposing of it or returning it to the store.If you purchased one of the recalled products and you or a loved one starts to experience any unusual or surprising health problems after it’s been used, you should see a doctor, the statement said. The FDA didn’t list specific symptoms to be on the lookout for.Any reactions to the recalled product can be reported to the FDA’s MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program, which tracks health issues caused by potentially unsafe or recalled products. Anyone with questions about the recall can also call Family Dollar’s customer service line (844-636-7687) for more information.Related:

Yes, Your TMJ Could Be Triggering Migraine Attacks

Yes, Your TMJ Could Be Triggering Migraine Attacks

If you experience migraine headaches, you’re probably all too familiar with the unpleasant symptoms: The throbbing head pain, sensitivity to light and sound, nausea, and vision changes can be debilitating and derail your entire day. Migraine isn’t just a severe headache—it’s a neurological disorder that develops as a result of complex changes in the nerves and blood vessels in the brain, resulting in inflammation. While the exact cause of the disorder isn’t fully understood, migraine attacks are often preceded by a person’s unique triggers, which can include hormonal changes, eating specific foods, stress, inadequate sleep, and exposure to certain types of light or strong smells, among so many others.Yet there’s one trigger that is often overlooked: temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, which is also known as TMD (but more colloquially referred to as TMJ). According to the Mayo Clinic, TMJ disorders cause pain and discomfort in the temporomandibular joint—the joint that connects your jawbone to your skull—and the muscles that control your jaw. TMJ can also cause restricted movement or “locking” of your jaw. For reasons researchers and orofacial pain specialists are still beginning to understand, the effects of TMJ disorders may also trigger headaches or full-blown migraine attacks.“Physicians aren’t taught very much about how the jaw interacts with other physical symptoms,” Mark Abramson, DDS, a TMJ specialist and adjunct professor of psychiatry and behavioral medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine, tells SELF. But we do know there is a link between the two conditions: People who are diagnosed with migraine are more likely to complain of tenderness and pain in the jaw area, which can also include the entire head, neck, and shoulders. “There is certainly a proportion of people with TMJ disorders who also suffer from migraine,” Belinda A. Savage-Edwards, MD, a neurologist and headache specialist based in Huntsville, Alabama, tells SELF.Why do TMJ disorders trigger migraine attacks in some people?Researchers are still working this out, but have some top theories. “The muscles that are connected to the [temporomandibular] joint can go into spasm with increased use—from talking, chewing, yawning widely, those kinds of things—and [those spasms] can trigger headaches,” says Dr. Savage-Edwards. “But it’s been shown that people with TMJ disorders are actually more prone to migraine headaches than tension headaches.”One potential explanation for the connection, explains Dr. Abramson, is the involvement of the trigeminal nerve, a nerve that is integral to operating the movement of the jaw, but also is targeted by certain migraine medications due to its connection in generating head and facial pain.1Another theory is that migraine attacks may be induced or aggravated by the causes and symptoms of a TMJ disorder, like teeth grinding that can set off the pain associated with chewing. “If someone always gets a headache after eating, the trigger could be the chewing itself,” says Dr. Savage-Edwards. “Or if they tend to wake up with these headaches, and are grinding their teeth and clenching their jaw throughout the night, that can also be a trigger.” Still, we have a lot to learn about the mechanics of how TMJ disorders might be linked to migraine attacks.How can you tell if a TMJ disorder might be causing your migraine symptoms?It might sound obvious, but if you have frequent migraine attacks and you have TMJ symptoms due to a flare, it’s likely the two are connected in some way. Where there’s smoke, there’s often fire. If you have migraine and also burning or intense pain in the jaw (especially after eating or chewing), jaw stiffness, a popping or clicking noise in the jaw, an unexplained change in your bite, and/or you know you grind your teeth at night, these are all signs of a TMJ disorder, says Dr. Savage-Edwards.2 Treating it might just improve the migraine situation, although this isn’t always the case.

The Herpes Symptom Many People Miss

The Herpes Symptom Many People Miss

“Cold sores are just a skin manifestation of the herpes virus,” Dr. Rodney adds. “There’s a stigma when people hear ‘herpes,’ and they think it’s terrible, but it’s usually caused by the HSV-1 virus. It’s so terribly common. There’s nothing to be ashamed of.”Sometimes, people even ask for a swab test that tells them which type of herpes they have because they wonder how they got it, says Dr. Abdur-Rahman. But as he explains, “testing positive for type 2 just means the herpes is caused by the virus that usually causes genital herpes, it doesn’t mean that you didn’t get it from kissing someone.” People usually get cold sores through close contact, like kissing and oral sex, but herpes is not always sexually transmitted: Sharing eating utensils, razors, and towels can spread the virus as well, the Mayo Clinic notes.The distinction doesn’t matter much in the practical sense—wherever your herpes shows up is where it shows up, independent of which strain brought it about or how you got it. But it’s key to know that if you have herpes, you can give it to someone else through kissing or oral sex, no matter which strain you have. Cold sores are contagious, particularly if you’re currently going through a flare and have an oozing blister, according to the Mayo Clinic.What are common cold sore symptoms to be aware of?People can confuse a cold sore for a canker sore, an angry noncontagious lesion that isn’t linked with herpes, or an exceptionally painful pimple, at least in the beginning before the blister opens up. In general, per the Mayo Clinic, you can expect the following cold sore symptoms:Tingling, itching, burning around the lipsA small, hard painful spotSmall, fluid-filled blisters along the border of your lipsOozing and crusting“One key sign is that sometimes you may feel pain and tingling in the area before the cold sore actually appears,” Dr. Rodney says. Cold sores also tend to show up in the same spot or region every time. “If you usually get cold sores on your right upper lip, it will usually appear in that same spot again in the future,” Dr. Rodney says.Cold sore symptoms can be slightly different during the first outbreak, though. The AAD says this initial infection typically happens during childhood and can lead to the following symptoms in addition to the ones above:FeverHeadacheMuscle achesSwollen lymph nodesNauseaSore throatPain when swallowingWhy do some cold sores come out of nowhere?Here’s the weird thing about cold sores: You can be infected with HSV-1 or HSV-2 and not have visible symptoms for years. In fact, some people can have several cold sores a year or only one or two in their lifetime—it really just depends on your body.“I’ve had a lot of patients who wonder if their partner cheated on them because they suddenly developed a cold sore,” Dr. Rodney says. “But that’s not the case—they just had their first visible outbreak later in life.”That’s because the virus lies dormant in your skin’s nerve cells, only to rear its head when it’s triggered to do so. These recurrences can be set off by a slew of different things, like a viral infection or fever, hormonal changes, stress, fatigue, exposure to sunlight and wind, changes in your immune system, or a skin injury, the Mayo Clinic notes. So, if you have a cold sore, it likely won’t be visible forever.Can you have herpes with no symptoms at all?Most people with herpes have it without knowing it. About two thirds of the global population under age 50 has HSV-1, according to the World Health Organization, and around one in every six people in the U.S. between ages 14 and 49 has genital herpes, according to the CDC. In fact, because it’s so common, doctors often don’t even test for herpes in the usual STI workup.

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