Health Conditions / Digestive Health / Foodborne Illness

5 Thanksgiving Food Safety Mistakes That Can Make You Seriously Sick

5 Thanksgiving Food Safety Mistakes That Can Make You Seriously Sick

If there’s only one cutting board around, it’s critical to clean and sanitize it in between uses “especially if you are going to use them for a raw product followed by a food that will not be cooked,” Dr. Shumaker says. Scrub your board down with plenty of soap and water to help keep things clean, Bruce Ruck, PharmD, the managing director of the NJ Poison Control Center at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, tells SELF. If you need to have a multipurpose board, reach for a plastic option instead of wood, since plastic boards are nonporous and won’t absorb bacteria into tiny cracks as easily. “Knives have to be washed well too,” Dr. Ruck adds.Don’t forget to keep tabs on how long food sits out.You might be tempted to display your beautiful spread of food before the actual eating takes place, but don’t leave it out too long. The USDA recommends that you refrigerate all perishable foods that have been sitting at room temperature within two hours of being cooked. After two hours, your food may enter the “danger zone,” which ranges between 40 and 140 degrees Fahrenheit. In that zone, harmful bacteria can quickly multiply. Dr. Ruck suggests wrapping food up and storing it in the fridge or a warming container like a slow cooker or chafing dish once it’s prepared to keep it at the appropriate temperature.As for leftovers? If you can wrap them up and refrigerate them within two hours of the food being prepared and left out, you should be good to go. …and don’t let your prepared dish languish in the car!When you’re traveling for Thanksgiving, don’t neglect any food you’re bringing with you. After all, it’s also subject to that two-hour rule—two hours from the time you prepared it, not two hours since you arrived. Helpful tip, per the USDA: Transport hot foods in insulated containers to keep them at a temperature of 140 degrees or higher. For cold foods, put them in a cooler with ice or gel packs to keep them at or below 40 degrees. Keep your hands (and everyone else’s) out of the bread basket.It’s normal to have a charcuterie plate, chips and dip, or a bread basket out for people to serve themselves. To keep things as clean as possible, put out spoons or tongs to make it easy for people to dole out snacks or sides without actually putting their hands all over it. “That’s a good practice in general,” Thomas Russo, MD, professor and chief of infectious disease at the University at Buffalo in New York, tells SELF. “Who knows where people’s hands have been and how good their hand hygiene is?”Dr. Russo says that the biggest concern in this kind of situation is a bug like norovirus, one of the most common pathogens that can trigger the stomach flu (aka gastroenteritis) or food poisoning, both of which cause relentless vomiting and diarrhea.And norovirus is commonly transmitted via contaminated food or liquids. “It’s extraordinarily infectious,” Dr. Russo stresses, noting that norovirus spreads quickly and easily when an infected person doesn’t wash their hands, including after using the bathroom, and makes direct contact with other people or surfaces other people may touch. Bottom line: How you handle your food matters! You shouldn’t let the stress of potential foodborne illness get in the way of enjoying your meal, but keeping these tips in mind can help you avoid feeling terrible later. And, of course, this isn’t a totally exhaustive list: Check out other food safety tips you should keep in mind year-round here.Related: 

Deli Meats and Cheeses Linked to Listeria Outbreak in Multiple States, CDC Says

Deli Meats and Cheeses Linked to Listeria Outbreak in Multiple States, CDC Says

A listeria outbreak that’s led to at least 13 hospitalizations, one death, and one pregnancy loss has been linked to deli meats and cheeses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). So far, the outbreak has caused illnesses in New York, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Maryland, Illinois, and California.The CDC didn’t name specific types of deli meats or cheeses, or certain brands, that have been linked to the outbreak, but it cautioned against cold cuts, lunch meats, hot dogs, and pâtés. No recalls have been issued yet.Listeria is a type of bacteria that easily spreads on deli countertops and deli slicers, the CDC notes, adding that the pathogens can survive and grow in cold temperatures. Most people infected with listeria don’t get critically sick but certain people are more likely to develop severe illness (which may require hospitalization), including pregnant people, anyone over the age of 65, and anyone with a weakened immune system. The potential risks for both pregnant people and their fetuses are serious: A listeria infection during pregnancy can lead to a miscarriage, stillbirth, premature delivery, or a life-threatening infection, the CDC says.If you’ve recently eaten deli meat or cheese and start to notice symptoms of listeria, you should see a doctor ASAP. Warning signs of the illness can vary from person to person, but may include fever and flu-like symptoms (like muscle aches, headache, and fatigue), as well as digestive issues like vomiting or diarrhea. In severe cases, listeria infection can cause a stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance, and even seizures. People who get severely ill from a listeria infection can sometimes be treated with antibiotics.To be on the safe side, you should probably just throw out any recently purchased deli meat or cheese, or make sure it’s steaming hot (at least 165 degrees Fahrenheit) before eating it because heat kills the bacteria, the CDC advises. You should also thoroughly clean your kitchen if you’ve recently purchased any deli meat or cheese. The CDC recommends disinfecting your refrigerator, any food containers, and all kitchen surfaces that may have come into contact with the potentially contaminated food.Given that the CDC is still trying to identify what food, exactly, caused the outbreak, it might be in your best interest to avoid the deli counter at your local supermarket for now, especially if infections have been confirmed in your state. Listeria can live for a long time in deli display cases and on equipment, so it’s not a bad idea to switch up your usual sandwich once lunchtime rolls around.Related:

What to Know About Norovirus, the Stomach Flu That Causes Nasty Symptoms

What to Know About Norovirus, the Stomach Flu That Causes Nasty Symptoms

Keep in mind, too, that norovirus cases are only expected to go up from here. “Kids are back in school,” which always boosts the risks of germs spreading, Richard Watkins, MD, an infectious disease physician and professor of internal medicine at the Northeast Ohio Medical University, tells SELF.People in general are interacting more these days too. “For a couple of years, we’ve all been in semilockdown,” William Schaffner, MD, an infectious disease specialist and professor of medicine at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, tells SELF. “This gives viruses the opportunities to spread, and norovirus is trying to get back to near-normal levels.” Norovirus “always has some winter seasonality to it,” Dr. Adalja adds.Norovirus symptoms are straight-up awful.Let’s just say you and your toilet would become well acquainted. The CDC notes that the most common symptoms of norovirus include watery diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, and stomach cramps or pain. Some people may also get a fever, headache, or body aches.And you can expect to feel exhausted from it all. “If given the options, I would take three weeks of a cold, cough, and fever over 48 hours of a stomach bug because it can really knock your socks off,” Anita Gorwara, MD, family medicine physician and director of urgent care at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, previously told SELF.Thankfully, you should feel better pretty fast.People usually develop norovirus symptoms between 12 to 48 hours after they’re exposed to it. From there, the illness usually lasts between one to three (very drawn out) days. “It can make you really miserably sick,” Dr. Schaffner says. “You just feel miserable.” Still, “most people recover just fine,” he adds.Unfortunately, you just have to ride this one out. There’s no specific treatment for norovirus, but Dr. Adalja says you can try to feel a bit better at home by taking something like Pepto-Bismol and other anti-nausea meds. Of course, trying to stay hydrated—even though eating and drinking will feel tough—is important. Having soups and beverages you like on hand can help.Dehydration is a risk because vomiting and diarrhea speed up fluid loss, which can be especially concerning in very young children, older adults, and people who are immunocompromised.So if you get “really, really sick”—meaning you can’t keep anything in or down‚ you’re in severe pain, you’ve had diarrhea for more than three days, or you see blood in your poop or vomit, Dr. Schaffner says it’s time to get urgent medical care, especially if you have an underlying health condition, like diabetes. (“Norovirus can send your diabetes control out of whack,” he notes.) If you’re dealing with symptoms of dehydration, it’s possible you may need to receive IV fluids to avoid potential complications, the CDC notes.There are a few things you can do to reduce your chances of dealing with norovirus.Again, norovirus can be hard to avoid when it’s making the rounds, but you should still try your best to stay safe. The CDC recommends washing your hands well and often, especially after using the toilet, changing diapers, before giving yourself or someone else medicine, and before eating, preparing, or handling food. “Good hand hygiene is really important,” Dr. Schaffner stresses. “Even if a small amount of [norovirus] is on a banister or doorknob, it can make you sick.” Hand sanitizer is helpful, too, if you need something in a pinch.If someone in your home is dealing with relentless vomiting or diarrhea, you’ll also want to clean and disinfect commonly used surfaces frequently (and immediately, if there’s an accident somewhere). Washing laundry promptly is a smart move too.Bottom line: Norovirus sucks, but it’s usually over quickly. Doing your best to prevent it by keeping your hands and home clean will go a long way in keeping this bug (and others) out of your future.Related:

Check Your Fridge, Friends: 25 Brands of Cheese Were Just Recalled

Check Your Fridge, Friends: 25 Brands of Cheese Were Just Recalled

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a food safety alert after two kinds of cheese—brie and camembert—were linked to a listeria outbreak in late September. So far, six illnesses and five hospitalizations have been reported in at least six states across the country, including California, Texas, Michigan, Georgia, New Jersey, and Massachusetts.The cheeses, made by Old Europe Cheese, Inc., were sold at various grocers, including Albertsons, Giant Foods, Lidl, Stop & Shop, Whole Foods, and “many more,” the CDC notes. They were sold under the following brand names: Black Bear, Block & Barrel, Charmant, Cobblestone, Culinary Tour, Fredericks, Fresh Thyme, Glenview Farms, Good & Gather, Heinen’s, Joan of Arc, La Bonne Vie, Lidl, Life in Provence, Market 32, Matrie’d, Metropolitan, Prestige, Primo Taglio, Red Apple Cheese, Reny Picot, St. Randeaux, St. Rocco, Taste of Inspiration, and Trader Joe’s.The recalled products each have a sell-by date from September 28 to December 14. You can check the packaging details (including the universal product codes) of the affected products here.Listeria causes about 1,600 infections (known as listeriosis) in the US each year, per the CDC. People are usually exposed to the bacteria after eating contaminated food, and the flu-like illness it causes can be serious for newborns, pregnant people, older people, and immunocompromised people.If you suspect you have the recalled cheese in your home, you should definitely toss it. This isn’t the time to skimp on cleaning your kitchen afterward, either. According to the Food and Drug Administration’s statement on the recall, you should thoroughly clean and sanitize anything the cheese may have come in contact with (such as cutting boards, food storage containers, or countertops) to reduce your risk of getting sick.If you had the recalled cheese in your home and you start noticing signs of illness, like fever, fatigue, body aches, vomiting, or diarrhea, you should touch base with a doctor to be on the safe side, if you can. In certain cases, antibiotics are recommended to treat listeriosis.The bottom line: If you have cheese in your fridge, it doesn’t hurt to check it out and make sure you’re in the clear.Related:

The E. Coli Outbreak in the Midwest Is Getting Worse, With 38 People Hospitalized So Far

The E. Coli Outbreak in the Midwest Is Getting Worse, With 38 People Hospitalized So Far

The “fast-moving” E. coli outbreak the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warned of earlier this month has escalated, as 38 people have reportedly been hospitalized. Additionally, eight people in Michigan have developed a rare form of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) as a result of the outbreak, according to reporting from ABC News. The outbreak has caused 53 illnesses in Michigan, 23 in Ohio, six in Indiana, and two in Pennsylvania so far, per the CDC.In a statement on the outbreak released on August 19, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) said HUS is a rare complication, affecting just 5 to 10% of people infected with E. coli. HUS occurs when blood vessels in the kidneys become damaged and inflamed, per the Mayo Clinic; it’s most common in young children, though anyone can develop HUS. Symptoms of HUS can include decreased frequency of urination, feeling very tired, losing the color in your cheeks, and losing the color inside the lower eyelids, per the MDHHS statement. While HUS can be fatal, more than half of people diagnosed with it recover with proper treatment, per the US National Library of Medicine (NLM).The current E. coli outbreak has not been definitively traced back to a specific food; however, many people who have been infected reported eating sandwiches with romaine lettuce from Wendy’s, per the CDC. Because of this, Wendy’s has removed the romaine lettuce used in sandwiches from restaurants in the affected regions.The CDC isn’t currently advising people to avoid Wendy’s, but it does recommend keeping certain severe symptoms on your radar, including diarrhea and a fever higher than 102 degrees Fahrenheit; diarrhea for more than three days; bloody diarrhea; vomiting to the point it’s difficult to stay hydrated; and signs of severe dehydration like low urine output, dry mouth or throat, and feeling dizzy when standing up.If you experience the signs of illness above, it’s important to seek immediate medical attention. Additionally, the CDC is asking anyone with E. coli symptoms to write down what they ate in the week before they got sick and to report their illness to either their local or state health department to help officials quell the outbreak.Related:

Nearly 350,000 Pounds of Blue Diamond Almonds Have Been Recalled Due to Salmonella

Nearly 350,000 Pounds of Blue Diamond Almonds Have Been Recalled Due to Salmonella

Nearly 350,000 pounds of almonds manufactured by Blue Diamond Growers have been voluntarily recalled after a sample tested positive for salmonella, per a statement from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The affected product is labeled as “Whole Brown Almonds” on the packaging and was sold in bulk (as opposed to individually packaged), according to the statement.The recall was initiated on August 5, per the FDA; the impacted almonds were distributed to three states—California, Colorado, and Illinois—as well as Canada, Germany, and Morocco. According to reporting from Food Safety News, all of the recalled product has now been recovered. However, if you want to double-check any Blue Diamond products you may have in your pantry, the batch and lot numbers of the recalled Whole Brown Almonds are below.Batch 1000223917 of Lot 186224001Batch 1000223941 of Lot 187224001Batch 1000223938 of Lot 187224001Batch 1000223977 of Lot 188224001Batch 1000224058 of Lot 191224001Batch 1000224066 of Lot 191224001Batch 1000224071 of Lot 192224001Batch 1000224159 of Lot 193224001Batch 1000224193 of Lot 194224001Batch 1000224233 of Lot 195224001Salmonella causes about 1.35 million infections, 26,500 hospitalizations, and 420 deaths in the US each year, per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). You can contract salmonella by eating contaminated food, drinking contaminated water, or through the environment, say, by touching infected animals or coming in contact with their feces.Symptoms of a salmonella infection can include fever, diarrhea, stomach cramps, vomiting, nausea, and headache, the CDC says. Signs of illness begin anywhere from six hours to six days after eating food contaminated with salmonella and can last between four to seven days. You should call a doctor or seek urgent medical attention if you experience severe symptoms, per the CDC, including: diarrhea combined with a fever higher than 102 degrees Fahrenheit; diarrhea for more than three days; bloody stools; prolonged vomiting; or signs of dehydration (like not peeing much, a dry mouth or throat, or dizziness when standing up). While most people infected with salmonella recover without treatment, antibiotics can be used to treat people who get severely ill or face a greater risk of severe illness, such as older adults or those with weakened immune systems.If you discover any recalled food in your home, you should dispose of it safely—and always do your best to avoid these food safety mistakes when preparing food at home.Related:

CDC Warns ‘Fast-Moving’ E. Coli Outbreak May Be Linked to Wendy’s Sandwiches

CDC Warns ‘Fast-Moving’ E. Coli Outbreak May Be Linked to Wendy’s Sandwiches

Public health officials are warning of a “fast-moving” E. coli outbreak impacting people in Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Indiana. The source of the outbreak isn’t yet confirmed; however, “many sick people” reported eating a sandwich from Wendy’s that contains romaine lettuce, according to a statement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The outbreak has so far caused 37 illnesses and 10 hospitalizations but no deaths, per the statement.Wendy’s is taking precautionary steps and is “fully cooperating with the investigation,” per the CDC. The fast food chain is removing the romaine lettuce used in sandwiches from restaurants in the affected regions. The CDC notes that lettuce used in Wendy’s salads is different from the romaine lettuce thought to be the cause of the outbreak. The agency is not currently advising people to stop eating at Wendy’s.The CDC also hasn’t identified other sources of the romaine lettuce that is suspected to be the cause of the illnesses. “At this time, there is no evidence to indicate that romaine lettuce sold in grocery stores, served in other restaurants, or in people’s homes is linked to this outbreak,” the statement said.E. coli are bacteria found in a number of places, including in the intestines of people and animals and in foods. Most strains of the bacteria are harmless, the CDC says, though some can make you sick, causing a range of unpleasant symptoms like diarrhea, severe stomach cramps, vomiting, and sometimes fever, as well as complications like a urinary tract infection, pneumonia, or respiratory illness.The CDC’s statement on the ongoing outbreak warns that if you have any of the following E. coli symptoms, you should contact a health care provider immediately:Diarrhea for more than three daysDiarrhea and a fever higher than 102 degrees FahrenheitBloody diarrheaVomiting to the point that you can’t keep liquids downDehydration symptoms (like not peeing much or having very dark urine, dry mouth and throat, or feeling dizzy when you stand up)Officials are also asking people to note what they’ve eaten recently if they experience E. coli symptoms, so the CDC can deduce what’s causing the current outbreak. Specifically, you should write down what you ate during the week before you got sick and report your illness to either your local or state health department. Regardless of where you live, you can prevent foodborne illnesses by following a few simple steps while preparing and eating food, the CDC says:Clean your preparation spaces (like kitchen countertops) and kitchen utensils.Wash your hands before you begin cooking.Wash produce under running water (before peeling or cutting it).Separate raw meat, poultry, and seafood from other foods.Use a thermometer to make sure your food is cooked at a safe temperature. (This guide from the US Department of Health & Human Services provides info on how hot your food needs to get to kill germs.)Make sure you keep perishable foods chilled in the refrigerator and thaw frozen foods in the refrigerator (not on your kitchen counter).If you’re trying a new recipe or working with a food that you’re not sure how to prepare, make sure to follow the instructions on the packaging (if they come with it) and check out our list of food safety mistakes you should always be mindful of here. Related:

Oat Milk, Protein Shakes, and Several Other Beverages Recalled Due to Bacteria Concerns

Oat Milk, Protein Shakes, and Several Other Beverages Recalled Due to Bacteria Concerns

On July 29, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that food manufacturer Lyons Magnus LLC is voluntarily recalling various beverage products, including popular protein drinks, coffees, and plant-based milk, due to potential “microbial contamination.” The FDA specifically called out the organism Cronobacter sakazakii, a bacterium that can cause a rare but potentially serious infection. The FDA says that no illnesses have been reported yet, but a preliminary analysis found that the impacted products “did not meet commercial sterility specifications.”A huge list of drinks is being recalled—53 items, to be specific—and it includes big-name brands like Oatly’s Barista Edition Oat Milk; Premier Protein’s Chocolate, Vanilla, and Café Latte Protein Shakes (in the carton); Intelligentsia’s ColdCoffee and Oat Latte cartons; and several Stumptown coffee drinks. The products were distributed across the country and retailers were not specified.To see if a drink you own is impacted, the FDA recommends looking at the lot code and best by date at the top of the carton (for individual cartons) or the side of the case (for multi-carton cases) and comparing it to the FDA’s list of recalled beverages, since a wide range of brands and individual products are impacted.Cronobacter is a germ that can live in very dry places, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It’s been detected in dry foods, like powdered infant formula, powdered milk, herbal teas, and starches. The FDA stresses that infections linked to Cronobacter sakazakii are not common, but possible symptoms can include fever, vomiting, and a urinary tract infection (UTI). People who are immunocompromised or otherwise “vulnerable,” including young children and the elderly, may face a higher risk of developing a severe infection, the FDA says, which would need to be swiftly treated with antibiotics.If you have a recalled product, the FDA is asking you to toss it immediately or return it to where you purchased it for a refund. You can also contact the Lyons Recall Support Center at 1-800-627-0557, or visit its website for more information.Worth noting: Cronobacter was also behind the temporary closure of the Abbott Nutrition facility in Sturgis, Michigan, which contributed to the baby formula shortage earlier this year. That investigation is now closed and the plant has been reopened.Related:

Food Safety Experts Are Begging You to Stop Washing Your Raw Chicken Already

Food Safety Experts Are Begging You to Stop Washing Your Raw Chicken Already

You’re getting ready to make your go-to chicken breast recipe. All the veggies are washed and ready to go. Now it’s time to prep the poultry—but, wait, are you supposed to wash chicken?“Your first inclination is to rinse it off and remove all the goop that’s on there,” Keith Schneider, PhD, a professor and food safety microbiologist at the University of Florida, tells SELF. But the ickiness of raw chicken is cosmetic as long as you plan on cooking it thoroughly. “You’re just making it look prettier by washing,” Dr. Schneider says.In fact, washing your chicken can actually make you or your dinner guests sick with a nasty case of foodborne illness. But don’t feel alone if you wash your bird first. Nearly 70% of 1,504 people surveyed said they washed or rinsed their poultry before cooking it, according to a 2015 study published in the Journal of Food Protection1.Interested in learning why this common practice isn’t a great idea? SELF talked to food safety experts about why you shouldn’t wash your chicken.So, what is the safest way to cook chicken to avoid getting sick?Chicken is ready to cook right from the package. You want to focus on cooking poultry properly because heat will kill bacteria lingering on your meat. “There’s a reason we don’t eat chicken and turkey sushi,” Dr. Schneider says. Chicken and other types of poultry should be cooked to an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). While you may think you can tell when food is cooked properly by analyzing its color or texture, the only way to know for sure is to use a food thermometer.For an accurate reading, Christine Venema, EdD, a food safety educator at Michigan State University Extension suggests sticking the thermometer into the thickest part of the breast or the thigh or leg of a whole bird. Don’t touch the bone, which is a different temperature than the rest of the chicken.Back to topWhat are the health risks of washing chicken before cooking it?Raw chicken (and other poultry or meat) can be contaminated with bacteria that may cause foodborne illnesses such as campylobacter and salmonella, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). “When you hit that [raw] chicken with water, there’s a tendency for the water to bounce off the chicken and spray everywhere,” Dr. Schneider says. And that raw chicken water can splash bacteria onto anything nearby, such as countertops, cooking surfaces, and other food2 (shudder). Hello, cross-contamination.“If you have any food product nearby, it can become contaminated with the bacteria that flies away from that sink,” Dr. Venema tells SELF. The USDA estimates that water can launch bacteria-filled droplets up to three feet around your sink.If you have been washing your chicken for years without any consequences, consider yourself lucky. But continuing to do so opens you up to food poisoning or the stomach flu, which can cause diarrhea, fever, stomach cramps, and vomiting, among other unpleasant symptoms, according to the CDC. Individuals who have a higher risk of developing serious cases of food poisoning, like people who are immunocompromised or pregnant, should really avoid washing raw chicken. The only time it might make sense to wash chicken before cooking is if you’re, say, on a farm, and washing the chicken far from where you prepare food, Londa Nwadike, PhD, an assistant professor and extension food safety specialist at Kansas State University, tells SELF. She grew up on a farm and remembers slaughtering chickens for food in her backyard when she was younger. That might then require washing feathers or blood away from the meat. “But the meat from the chicken you buy at [the] grocery store should be clean,” Dr. Nwadike says.

Daily Harvest Recalls Lentil Crumbles Following Reports of Severe Illness

Daily Harvest Recalls Lentil Crumbles Following Reports of Severe Illness

Food kit delivery brand Daily Harvest has come under fire after recalling one of its products, the French Lentil + Leek Crumbles, and then informing consumers via an ambiguous Instagram post.Last week, Daily Harvest posted a photo of the recalled product on Instagram, with the caption: “An important message regarding our French Lentil + Leek Crumbles. Link in bio with details.” Many criticized the company for vaguely alluding to a problem with the food, which is reportedly causing various health issues for many consumers, instead of clearly warning people about the risk of eating it. “Why not include the important message in the caption? Is your social media aesthetic more important than consumers’ health?” one commenter wrote. Another commenter said, “This is an emergency not a P.R. stunt.” And another wrote: “This isn’t how you inform your customers that one of your products is sending people to the hospital.”Instagram contentThis content can also be viewed on the site it originates from.You read that right: the hospital. Social media users have reported experiencing a variety of horrifying symptoms, including organ failure, after eating the lentil crumbles. One Twitter user claimed they spent time in the E.R., while Reddit users alleged the crumbles caused liver damage and food poisoning symptoms (like vomiting). TikTok user Abby Silverman also documented her experience after eating the crumbles, explaining that she started having “extreme stomach and gastro pain” the day after eating the crumbles, which she received as a P.R. gift. She went to the emergency room, where, she says, doctors noted “elevated liver levels” and bacteria in her urine and incorrectly diagnosed her with urinary tract infection. Five days later, she says, she still had extreme pain and a temperature of 101.8 degrees Fahrenheit, prompting a second emergency room visit. After receiving an email from Daily Harvest explaining the risk associated with the food she consumed, she now believes her symptoms—which are still being monitored—were connected to the product. “This is really, really serious. People are having serious health issues,” she said on TikTok. (SELF has not independently verified any of the social media claims.)TikTok contentThis content can also be viewed on the site it originates from.“We’ve received customer reports of French Lentil + Leek Crumbles causing gastrointestinal issues,” a statement from the company dated June 19 said. “We took immediate steps to address what we heard from customers, reaching out to every person who received French Lentil + Leek Crumbles, instructing them to dispose of the product and not eat it.” The statement said Daily Harvest has also launched an investigation to discern what’s causing the illnesses linked to the crumbles.Daily Harvest has not replied to SELF’s request for comment at time of publishing. The company’s statement on the recalled product advised consumers to email hello@daily-harvest.com with questions regarding the recall.Related:

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