Health Conditions / Autoimmune Diseases

9 Possible Reasons You Always Wake Up Soaked in Sweat

9 Possible Reasons You Always Wake Up Soaked in Sweat

Back to top3. Menopause“If someone is having night sweats, my first thought is to ask them about their periods to see whether they are menopausal,” Barrie Weinstein, MD, an assistant professor of endocrinology, diabetes, and bone disease at the Icahn School of Medicine in New York City, tells SELF.Menopause can happen at any point in a person’s 50s, 40s, or even as early as their 30s if they experience premature menopause, according to the Mayo Clinic. Thanks to fluctuating hormones—specifically, reduced estrogen and progesterone—menopause can cause a slew of unpleasant symptoms, including hot flashes that lead to night sweats, chills, irregular or absent periods, mood changes, vaginal dryness, a slower metabolism, and thinning hair, among others, per the Mayo Clinic.Menopause is a completely normal condition that doesn’t automatically require treatment (unless it starts too early, which can be a different story), but that doesn’t mean you don’t have options if symptoms like night sweats are interfering with your life. “If patients are having night sweats that are intolerable, they can discuss with their doctor whether hormone replacement would be a good option for them,” Dr. Weinstein says. Different kinds of hormone therapy can help relieve various menopause symptoms, according to The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). But if that’s not something you’re interested in or your doctor doesn’t recommend it as a safe choice for you, there are other medications, including some low-dose antidepressants, that can help decrease those dreaded hot flashes, according to the National Institute on Aging.Back to top4. Obstructive sleep apneaObstructive sleep apnea, or OSA2, is a common sleep disorder that causes your breathing to stop and start briefly while you’re snoozing. If you have OSA, your throat muscles relax when they shouldn’t, which interferes with your airway’s ability to get enough oxygen while you sleep.And yes, it can make you sweat. “One of my colleagues says it’s like you go to the Olympics every night because you’re working so hard to breathe,” Rafael Pelayo, MD, a clinical professor in the division of sleep medicine at Stanford University and author of How to Sleep: The New Science-Based Solutions for Sleeping Through the Night, tells SELF. Besides night sweats, other symptoms of OSA include loud snoring, excessive fatigue during the day, abruptly waking up during the night while gasping or choking, morning headaches, mood changes, a lower sex drive, and more. If that sounds concerning, well, you’re right on target. OSA can be serious and requires prompt treatment.Treatment options include lifestyle changes like using a nasal decongestant before you sleep or avoiding sleeping on your back, sleeping with a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine to keep your airways open, using a mouthguard to do the same, and more intensive options, like surgery to remove the tissue that’s blocking your airways.Back to top5. Acid refluxAcid reflux happens when stomach acid travels back up into the esophagus, which commonly triggers the feeling of heartburn3. When this happens chronically—more than twice per week—it’s known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Anecdotally, some people who have acid reflux or GERD experience night sweats, which tend to resolve once the acid reflux is treated, Dr. Paauw says. There are very few studies exploring the link between night sweats and acid reflux, so experts aren’t 100% certain why the two are connected. However, Dr. Paauw believes acid reflux may trigger the autonomic nervous system4, which regulates bodily processes such as breathing, to increase heart rate. And an elevated heart rate may lead to excessive sweat, he says. When someone is lying down, they don’t have the benefit of gravity to help keep stomach acid from flowing into the esophagus, which may explain why people with acid reflux experience night sweats, Dr. Paauw says.

What Does Following a Celiac Disease Diet Really Look Like?

What Does Following a Celiac Disease Diet Really Look Like?

Unfortunately, these grains and their derivatives can be found in what seems like everything, so it can be helpful to know exactly what foods to avoid. The good news is there are many gluten-free alternatives to the favorites on this list. According to the Celiac Disease Foundation, these are gluten heavy hitters:Breads, such as loaves, bagels, pita, and flour tortillasPastries, such as croissants, muffins, and donutsPasta, such as spaghetti, ravioli, and gnocchiNoodles, such as egg noodles, ramen, and chow meinBaked goods, such as cookies, cakes, and piesBreakfast foods, such as cereals, granola, and pancakesSnacks, such as candy bars, crackers, and pretzelsCondiments, such as dressings, sauces, and gravyEven foods that don’t naturally contain gluten, such as oats, can be risky if they’ve potentially been cross-contaminated. “Regular oats are highly contaminated with gluten from growing and processing, so one can only consume oats that are labeled gluten-free,” says Smith.Back to topWhat naturally gluten-free foods can you eat on a celiac disease diet?At first glance, a celiac disease diet can seem really restrictive (Really, no bread?!), but you might be surprised to learn just how many foods are naturally gluten-free. In fact, the Celiac Disease Foundation points out that people with celiac disease can still enjoy plenty of eats.While the main action item on this diet is to avoid gluten, it’s still equally important to eat a diverse range of foods to get all your essential nutrients, says Dr. Jossen. Let’s dive into what that might look like with these four naturally gluten-free food groups.Fruits and vegetablesIn general, the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend eating at least 2.5 cups of vegetables and 2 cups of fruit per day.2 Here’s the even better part: Not only are fruits and vegetables naturally gluten-free, but they are chock-full of important nutrients, so feel free to fill your plate with as many as possible. Throw some broccoli into your egg scramble, mix some cauliflower rice into your taco bowl, or roast some Brussels sprouts to have with your dinner for a little veggie boost.Meat, poultry, and seafoodWhen it comes to protein choices, meat, poultry, and seafood are all naturally gluten-free. These animal products are great sources of essential nutrients, especially protein and B vitamins. That being said, if you’re gluten-free and also vegetarian or vegan, you’ll want to fill your protein needs from plant-based sources like beans, tofu, legumes, nuts, and seeds instead.Milk, eggs, and dairyAccording to an older study published in the journal Digestion, lactose intolerance is often associated with celiac disease.3 However, not everyone with celiac disease is lactose intolerant, and milk, yogurt, and cheese are great sources of B vitamins, vitamin D, and calcium—especially if you’re on a gluten-free diet. If you can’t tolerate milk and dairy, still consider the humble egg. Not only are eggs naturally gluten-free, but they are a great source of protein.Legumes, beans, nuts, and seedsEven if you’re not vegetarian or vegan, diversifying where you get your starches from can help boost the nutrition of your meals. You may be surprised by how many gluten-free starches are out there, too. Choose gluten-free products made from a variety of grains when you can, this includes not just rice and corn but also quinoa, buckwheat, amaranth, and teff, Dr. Jossen says. Let’s not forget legumes, like black beans, chickpeas, and peas, all varieties of potatoes, and nutrient-rich nuts and seeds, either.

Oscars Controversy Sheds Light on Jada Pinkett Smith’s Alopecia

Oscars Controversy Sheds Light on Jada Pinkett Smith’s Alopecia

During last night’s 94th annual Academy Awards, Jada Pinkett Smith was thrown into the center of a major controversy when her husband Will Smith struck Chris Rock (who was presenting the award for best documentary) on stage after Rock made a joke about Pinkett Smith’s shaved head. Many people in the audience and at home might not have initially understood why the King Richard star was so upset by the joke, which likened his wife to having a G.I. Jane-style cut, but Pinkett Smith has been open about losing her hair to alopecia. Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease in which a person’s immune system attacks healthy hair follicles, causing them to decrease in size and production, typically resulting in hair falling out in clumps, according to the Cleveland Clinic. In rare cases, an individual can lose all the hair on their head or their body, but the severity of the condition varies from person to person. For some, the hair might grow back and stay there; for another person, the hair might regrow but then fall out again later. According to the National Alopecia Areata Foundation, estimates show that up to 6.8 million people in the U.S. are affected by alopecia.Pinkett Smith first shared her hair loss experience in 2018 during her Red Table Talk series. “I was in the shower one day and had just handfuls of hair in my hands and I was just like, ‘Oh my god, am I going bald?’” she recalled. “It was one of those times in my life where I was literally shaking in fear. That’s why I cut my hair, and why I continue to cut it,” she added. Later that month, she took to Instagram, and in a now-deleted video said she was getting steroid injections which were helping “but not curing” her condition. There’s currently no cure for alopecia, but intralesional corticosteroid injections, the type Pinkett Smith received, are the most common alopecia treatment. During this process, a dermatologist uses a very small needle to inject corticosteroids into bare patches of skin every four to six weeks. The steroids work to reduce inflammation and suppress the immune system’s attack on the hair follicles.In mid-2021, ahead of her 50th birthday, Pinkett Smith debuted her shaved head publicly. Of course, she looked beautiful alongside her daughter, Willow Smith, who was also sporting a buzzed cut. “Willow made me do it because it was time to let go BUT … my 50’s are bout to be Divinely lit with this shed,” she wrote. Instagram contentThis content can also be viewed on the site it originates from.

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