Gordon Murray Automotive

Gordon Murray’s New T.33 Supercar Is the Little Sister That Can’t Be Ignored

Gordon Murray’s New T.33 Supercar Is the Little Sister That Can’t Be Ignored

Gordon Murray Automotive’s second supercar is here, and while she may be a little sister of sorts to the T.50, she won’t be easily overshadowed.

Legendary car designer Gordon Murray finally unveiled his latest creation, the T.33, to the world on Thursday. No, the new model isn’t as boundary pushing as its much ballyhooed sibling, but it still likely to catch the attention of enthusiasts the world over, thanks to its massively powerful V-12 and optional manual transmission. Oh, and it’s pretty easy on the eyes, too.

Like the T.50, the T.33 ‘s exterior is clearly inspired Murray’s most famous road car, the McLaren F1. It’s more compact than big sis—it measures 14.4 feet bumper to bumper and is six feet wide—and features a more minimalist design. Although both cars have similar aerodynamic shapes, the T.33 is less radically styled, lacking the T.50’s shark fin and gigantic rear diffuser. To be sure, it’s still a supercar, but one that will look comfortable on the drive home from work.

Gordon Murray Automotive T.33 

Gordon Murray Automotive

The differences inside the car are less subtle. Whereas the T.50 featured a centralized driving position, with the driver seat in front flanked behind by two others, the T.33 is a more traditional two-seater. This isn’t the only change, though. The T.33’s cabin is also much roomier. There’s a reason for this. Murray told Car and Driver he designed the interior so that it would be comfortable to drive long distances, and while he didn’t want to call it a grand tourer, the T.33 has the room and luggage space of one.
Of course, the car won’t lack for grunt. It’s powered by a Cosworth-built V-12 just like its older sibling. The 4.0-liter mill uses gear-driven camshafts that allow it to pump out 607 hp at 10,500 rpm and 332 ft lbs of torque at 9,000 rpm (the T.50’s V-12 generates 654 hp and 344 ft lbs of torque), according a press release. This time around you’ll be able to choose between one of two transmissions from UK-based Xtrac—either a six-speed manual or paddle-shift six-speed automatic.

The Gordon Murray Automotive T.33’s V-12 engine 

Gordon Murray Automotive

True to form, the automaker isn’t releasing performance figures for the car. It does weight 2,400 pounds, which is just 220 pounds more than the T.50. That also means that Murray’s latest speed machine weighs about as much as a ultra-compact Mazda Miata, according to Road & Track. So, it should be plenty fast.

The light weight is due, in part, to a unique aluminum tube-frame chassis, with carbon-fiber panels making up the passenger cabin and engine bay. It’s also equipped with a stripped-down suspension setup that includes double wishbones but doesn’t feature the adaptive dampers so common on other supercars. There’s no anti-roll bar in the rear, either.

Inside the Gordon Murray Automotive T.33 

Gordon Murray Automotive

The T.33 is being positioned as a more “accessible” supercar, but in this case that’s purely a relative term. After all, it’s still a supercar created by one of the most respected designers in automotive history. And it will have the astronomical price tag to match. Specifically, the car, which will be limited to just 100 examples (nearly half of which have already been reserved), will start at $1.83 million before taxes. Yes, that is less than the T.50’s $3 million sticker price, but it will make the T.33 one of the most expensive vehicles to debut this year. Gordon Murray’s faithful will no doubt let us know whether it’s worth it.
Check out more images of the T.33 below:

Gordon Murray Automotive

Gordon Murray Automotive

Gordon Murray Automotive

Gordon Murray Automotive

Gordon Murray Automotive

Gordon Murray Automotive

Gordon Murray Automotive

Watch Gordon Murray’s T.50 Make Its World Debut at Goodwood

Watch Gordon Murray’s T.50 Make Its World Debut at Goodwood

Gordon Murray Automotive’s first creation is finally ready for the spotlight.

The design legend’s new vehicle, the T.50, made its public debut at the 78th Goodwood Members’ Meeting over the weekend. Following two years of tantalizing teases, the silver speed machine didn’t just look the part of a next-generation hypercar, it sounded it too.
Former racecar driver Dario Franchitti piloted the T.50 was piloted around the 2.37-mile Goodwood Circuit. The track legend, who plans to buy one of the supercars for himself, took it for three full turns around the course, showing just some of what the vehicle can do thanks to rain-slick track conditions. Despite this, you can really hear the scream of its powertrain in a video uploaded to the official Goodwood YouTube channel.

Gordon Murray Automotive’s T.50 hypercar makes its debut at the 78th Goodwood Members Meeting 

Goodwood Road & Racing/YouTube

“What a sound,” one of the commentators exclaims early in the clip. “Halloween is approaching and that sounds like the sort of banshee wail that would scare the children.”
That “banshee wail” comes courtesy of what may be the T.50’s most impressive feature: its 12-cylinder Cosworth-sourced heart. With even supercar specialists embracing electrification and hybridization, a naturally aspirated 3.9-liter V-12 is a bit of an oddity in 2021. It’s also a true powerhouse. Mated to a six-speed manual gearbox, the T.50 engine will churn out 654 horses and 344 ft lbs of torque and have a redline of 12,100 rpm. The marque has so far declined to release performance estimates for the vehicle, but Murray himself told Robb Report last summer that it would be “blindingly quick.”
Aside from its head-turning powertrain, the T.50 has a curvaceous design that bears more than a passing resemblance to the designer’s most famous supercar, the McLaren F1 (both vehicles also have gullwing doors). There’s also a prominent 16-inch fan jutting out the rear that isn’t just there for decoration but helps cool the engine and improves aerodynamics. Combine all of this with a curb weight of 2,174 pounds and the T.50 has the potential to be a rocket on wheels.
We’ll get to find out soon enough. Gordon Murray Automotive plans to start building the T.50 in January, with deliveries scheduled for later in 2022. The marque has said it will build 100 examples of the $3 million hypercar. Production of a $3.4-million track-only version, the T.50s Niki Lauda, will commence in January 2023.

We can’t wait to hear how loud that variant is.

Watch Gordon Murray Drive His Hotly Anticipated T.50 for the First Time

Watch Gordon Murray Drive His Hotly Anticipated T.50 for the First Time

Having designed the iconic McLaren F1, Gordon Murray knows a thing or three about high-performance cars. And while he might be just a tad bit biased, the legendary designer looked like a proud dad after getting behind the wheel of his latest creation.
Gordon Murray Automotive has just released a video of Murray taking his first test drive in the upcoming T.50 hypercar. Though he only got to take the prototype for a quick spin around an airport tarmac, the designer seemed more than satisfied with the results.

Half way through five-minute clip, a mask-wearing Murray can be seen buckled up and ready to go behind the wheel of the T.50 Experimental Prototype 2 (XP2) with one of his engineers seated in back. Once the engine is engaged, the designer sets off around the tarmac, and though he never comes close to pushing the car to its limits—he only brings the engine to 3,000 rpm, nowhere near its 12,100 rpm redline—you can really hear the roar of its engine.
Gordon Murray (far left) inspects the T.50 XP2 before his test drive  Gordon Murray Automotive

It should come as no surprise that the car makes its presence known, even when barely revving above idle. The ultra-light speed machine’s naturally aspirated 3.9-liter Cosworth V-12 is a real powerhouse, capable of producing 654 horsepower and 344 ft lbs of torque. Despite that muscular mill, the car was designed with a focus on the driver experience not performance specs. According to Murray, it may well deliver on both.
“The XP2 prototype is currently running at considerably less revs than its 12,100-rpm limit, yet the T.50 felt fantastic on my first drive,” Murray said in a statement to Road & Track. “The car was responsive, agile and rewarding to drive. It was a fantastic experience to be sitting in the center of the car once again with great all-round visibility and I can see how much the owners will enjoy this experience.”
You’ll soon get your chance to get behind the wheel of Murray’s next-generation hypercar. The T.50 is set to go into production at the beginning of next year. Of course, if you plan to add the futuristic vehicle to your collection, prepare to fork over the cheddar. The T.50 will start at $3 million before taxes.

Gordon Murray’s New T.50s Niki Lauda Is a 750 HP Track-Ready Beast

Gordon Murray’s New T.50s Niki Lauda Is a 750 HP Track-Ready Beast

Gordon Murray’s much ballyhooed T.50 hypercar won’t be here until next January, but that hasn’t stopped the legendary designer from announcing a new model named after late Formula 1 legend Niki Lauda.
Unveiled on what would have been the race car drivers 72nd birthday, the T.50s Niki Lauda is designed, appropriately enough, for the track. And while it may look just like its road-going sibling, Murray’s latest automotive confection brings more power and an even lighter curb weight.

Gordon Murray Automotive T.50s Niki Lauda  Dean Smith Photography/Gordon Murray Automotive

Since the T.50 is heavily inspired by the designer’s most famous creation, the McLaren F1, you’d be forgiven for assuming that that the T.50s Niki Lauda would be influenced by the McLaren’s track-only variant, the F1 GTR.  But that assumption would be wrong. Murray’s new hypercars were designed and developed alongside one another—spiritual siblings but distinct vehicles.
“For the T.50 our target was clear, to make the best driver’s car for the road,” Murray said in a statement. “With the T.50s Niki Lauda it was equally clear, to make it the best driver’s car for the track. Putting it another way, we asked ourselves what would be the coolest thing to drive on track and create a track driving experience like no other car in history?”
Dean Smith Photography/Gordon Murray Automotive

Since the T.50 was first announced, Murray made clear he was more focused on driver experience than performance specs. Track driving, of course, is different, and it seems that this time the marque has put its effort into building the most powerful vehicle possible. The T.50s Niki Lauda is powered by a naturally aspirated, Cosworth-designed 3.9-liter V-12 which combines with a roof-mounted, high-performance RAM induction airbox to deliver 725 hp and 358 ft lbs of torque. It can also rev at 12,100 rpm.
Those impressive figures mark are an increase of 71 horses and 14 ft lbs of twist over the street-legal T.50, significant bumps that can be attributed to revised cylinder heads and camshafts, as well as to a higher compression ratio of 15:1. The vehicle’s mighty mill is mated to an automatic Xtrac Instantaneous Gearshift six-speed paddle shift gearbox, which won’t thrill the purists but can still be used to push the car up to 210 mph (a top speed has yet to be announced for the T.50).
Dean Smith Photography/Gordon Murray Automotive

More power usually means more weight, but not this time. The T.50 tips the scales at 2,174 pounds, but the T.50s Niki Lauda is even lighter, weighting in at just 1,878 pounds. The two cars are built on the same carbon-fiber monoque chassis, but all the track-focused model’s carbon-fiber body panels are entirely unique. Despite this, the chassis was constructed using advanced part-binding technology to ensure structural rigidity. The car’s windows and screens have also been glazed to reduce weight.

The Niki Lauda edition also features a significantly more dramatic aerodynamics package. The added elements include a large front splitter and an equally prominent rear diffuser. A Le Mans car-style longitudinal fin also extends from the roof of the driver’s cabin back to a giant rear delta wing inspired by Murray’s 1983 Brabham BT52 Formula One car.
The interior cabin has also been given a minimalist makeover. The T.50’s three seats have been replaced by a single racing seat with a six-point harness. Other than that, the only real features are a carbon-fiber steering wheel and a single screen that will display only the most critical driving information, to make sure you’re not distracted while out on the track.
Inside the T.50s Niki Lauda  Dean Smith Photography/Gordon Murray Automotive

As you might expect, the T.50s Niki Lauda will be even more exclusive than its limited-edition sibling. Only 25 of the track-focused model will be built, and 15 have already been spoken for. The marque’s second car will cost $3.4 million, with production expected to begin in January 2023, once the T.50 production run has been complete.

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