Givenchy

Trend Alert: Givenchy’s FW22 Collection Bags Are a Celebration of Sophisticated Femininity

Trend Alert: Givenchy’s FW22 Collection Bags Are a Celebration of Sophisticated Femininity

Photo: Amina Zaher
Ever since Matthew M. Williams was appointed creative director at Givenchy in 2020, the fashion house’s collections have come with a modernized air, offering a sense of reality, authenticity and an elevated sort of chicness. “I want to make clothing that feels like it’s been touched by the human hand,” Williams once said about his creations.
When Williams designs, his focus extends to the tiniest of details, and Givenchy’s Fall/Winter 2022 collection serves as proof. The latest season seems to galvanize the world by making both the formal and informal accessible for everyday wear. Think sharp pieces that share space with worn denim, sequins and pearls, blending opposing elements to create a new narrative. Ruffled wool dresses sit pretty alongside tailored numbers, and ornamental elements balance out the practicality of day-to-day staples.
What’s more, the new season also reimagines embellishment for a modern finish. Hardware is repurposed as jewelry, and pearls dot clothing in place of predictable studs. Accompanying the interesting collection, of course, is a new era of ‘It bags’. This time around, Givenchy offers up a selection of accessories that embrace a softer construction with bags like the G-Hobo, which comes with the brand’s signature lock, and new-age editions of the Kenny and the 4G bags. Presented in a soothing palette of celadon, ultraviolet, and pearly white, the fashion house’s arm candy is anything but basic. Below, take a closer look at Givenchy’s latest season.
Photo: Amina Zaher
Photo: Amina Zaher
Photo: Amina Zaher
Givenchy’s FW22 Collection is available online at Givenchy.com

Photography: Amina Zaher Style: Mohammad Hazem Rezq Hair and makeup: Ivan Kuz Model: Kristine Angeshi at MMG Production: Danica Zivkovic Photography assistant: Mostafa Abdu 

Harvey Nichols Sees Sales Dip, Losses Widen in Year Marred by Closures

Harvey Nichols Sees Sales Dip, Losses Widen in Year Marred by Closures

LONDON — Sales dipped and losses widened at Harvey Nichols in fiscal 2021, but the company said it is well financed and ready to expand.The group, which operates eight department stores in the U.K. and Ireland; six international units, and the OXO Tower restaurant in London, said Monday that in the year ended March 27, 2021, losses after taxes widened to 38.6 million pounds from 15.5 million pounds in the previous year.
For earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization, the group registered a loss of 28.1 million pounds, compared with a loss of 1.1 million pounds a year earlier.
The larger loss reflected ongoing lockdowns, a “sharp” reduction in tourist arrivals, and store closures that lasted nearly eight out of the 12 months in the reporting period, according to the accounts filed this week at Companies House, the official register of U.K. businesses.

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Group turnover fell to 121.3 million pounds in fiscal 2021, compared with 222.1 million pounds in the previous period.
The group noted it has a “supportive owner” in the Hong Kong-based businessman Dickson Poon, and is well funded after having secured 66 million pounds in the year. It received 26 million pounds from its owner; 35 million pounds from a new five-year term loan secured in June 2021, and has a 5 million pound overdraft facility, which Harvey Nichols said is not currently being used.

Harvey Nichols welcomed customers back on June 15, emphasizing social distancing.
WWD

Manju Malhotra, chief executive officer of Harvey Nichols, said that like most retailers, the group was significantly impacted by lockdowns and a sharp reduction in tourist arrivals due to travel restrictions. She added while online performance remained strong, it was not sufficient to offset the impact of the closure of physical stores and the reduced footfall in city centers.
“During these unprecedented times, we have not stood still and focused on managing costs and cash flow during store closures and investing in our IT systems and website to drive our online channel. We have broadened our category appeal and continued to look at creative ways to maintain the excellent service our customers expect,” she said.
Malhotra noted that there remains a “high degree” of uncertainty around how the pandemic will play out, “but during the period we have continued to implement exciting new initiatives across the business to drive loyalty and excellent customer shopping experience. While market conditions remain extremely challenging, we believe we have the right strategy in place to achieve our ambition of delivering sustainable profitable growth over the long term.”
The company said that since the fiscal 2022 year began, it has continued to invest in the website and IT systems and a new customer rewards program, which it plans to launch at the end of January 2022, offering customers “curated benefits” and cash back. The program is meant to align with the launch of a transactional app in the new year.
The company said it has fortified its relationships with Farfetch and Ocado in the wake of online demand during the pandemic and has “elevated” its personal shopping offer, including the launch of an at-home wardrobe refresh service.
From a sustainability standpoint, the retailer has been working with The Restory, a specialist repair service for luxury products, and Kids O’Clock, which resells children’s pre-loved clothes. The store also welcomed Cocoon to its London store offering a luxury bag subscription service.

Harvey Nichols has expanded into children’s clothes, which it said was the fastest-growing area of the industry. The department, both in-store and online, features brands including Givenchy, Balmain and Chloé.

The Style Evolution of Kim Kardashian West, from Socialite to Trendsetter

The Style Evolution of Kim Kardashian West, from Socialite to Trendsetter

There’s no denying, Kim Kardashian, Vogue Arabia’s September 2019 cover star, has an impactful influence on fashion. While today her choices are often sleek and inspiring, her journey to obtaining the polished, Instagram-worthy look has been a little rocky along the way.
When Kardashian first made a name for herself – as Paris Hilton’s stylist and friend – her style featured figure-hugging bodycon dresses, in the noughties IT bags and oversized gold hoops were her go-to accessories of choice. Over a decade later, and beauty mogul has transitioned into a sartorial trailblazer with a fearless approach to fashion. Her daring style is emulated around the world. Whether she’s wearing an emerging streetwear label or a vintage designer relic, the KKW effect has the power to create a new craze, or controversy – either way, she gets people talking.
“I think that Kim Kardashian’s style evolution is definitely something worth mentioning,” says Egyptian celebrity fashion stylist, Yasmine Eissa, “Kim is a perfect reference for how fashion can be a great marketing and PR tool. She started off by wearing high-end party dresses, which were all wearable and could be sourced. She later transformed her style into a bold, unique look. We now see her in second-skin silhouettes, mesh and plastic fabrics, exotic leathers and a lot of pastel and nude colors. She opts for cutouts, transparent pieces, the latest catwalk looks and custom made outfits. Her style is definitely controversial, but it makes her the woman everyone wants to copy.”
In the early years of Keeping Up With The Kardashians, the former reality TV star made laid-back red-carpet appearances in jeans and knee-high boots. This was followed by a series of wrap dresses and platform wedges – before she advanced to designer outfits from the likes of Givenchy, Azzedine Alaïa and Balmain. Kardashian was then spotted on front rows at fashion week and formed close friendships with some of the industry’s most noteworthy names; including Olivier Rousteing, Riccardo Tisci, and Valentino Garavani.
As Kardashian’s style has evolved, we’ve learned to appreciate her elevated take on athleisure, her monochromatic dressing in earthy tones and her interesting play on proportions – often styling an exaggerated fur coat with a waist-pinching bodysuit. In recent years, she has taken inspiration from her former designer-husband Kanye West and adopted a low-key, street-inspired aesthetic, yet she has always maintained a penchant for skintight silhouettes that have become her signature style throughout the years.
Read Next: 9 Times Kim Kardashian West and Kanye West Served Couple Goals in Style

Givenchy Leans Into Its New 4G Bag

Givenchy Leans Into Its New 4G Bag

Living up to a name that coincidentally echoes widely used cell-phone technology, Givenchy’s new 4G bag is sending out signals around the world.
Two gleaming steel huts composed of outsized Gs folded into cubes recently landed at the IFC mall in Shanghai, to be followed by other pop-ups at Centria mall in Riyadh and the Isetan department store in Tokyo in the coming months.
A fast-paced campaign video featuring Meadow Walker and He Cong debuts online today, just ahead of the 4G’s arrival in stores on May 1.
South Korean girl group Aespa, already fans of Givenchy, are among celebrity ambassadors conscripted for activations. Others include Ouyang Nana and Fan Chengcheng.
In short, Givenchy is putting major marketing muscle behind the sleek, chain-handled style, which debuted in December as part of the pre-fall 2021 collection by creative director Matthew Williams, who has brought a fierce, hard-edged chic to the couture house since arriving last June.

Givenchy’s 4G bag comes in small and medium sizes. 

The bag’s clasp and embossed leather display a tweaked version of Givenchy’s 4G emblem, which has been present in collections since the time of founder Hubert de Givenchy, who retired from fashion design in 1995 and passed away in 2018.
It arrives on the market amid renewed interest in visible branding at Europe’s heritage houses, with Versace building its fall 2021 collection around its new La Greca motif, Celine riding high on its emblem and signature canvas, and Balmain spinning out new versions of its Labyrinth pattern from 1945 on new clothes and leather goods, to cite but a few examples.

Givenchy’s 4G bag is a classic, rectangular style that has been modernized with sharper architectural lines and a prominent logo clasp. It comes in a range of leathers, either smooth, crinkled or embossed with the 4G logo, and in chain or flap versions. The length of the chain on the former, in silver or gold, is adjustable, while the flap bag’s strap can be removed or adjusted. Both can be worn in a number of ways — as a clutch, shoulder bag or hands-free slung across the body.
Retail prices range from 1,290 euros for a small, crossbody flap version to 1,690 euros for a medium-sized chain bag. A python version runs up to 3,190 euros.
Williams said he discovered the 4G emblem during a trawl through the archives, spotting it as a repeating pattern on a carpet in a boutique. The links in the chain handle are also subtly G-shaped — among a range of signature hardware that Williams designed when he first arrived at Givenchy, applying skills learned at his 1017 Alyx RSM brand, famous for its roller-coaster buckle.

Givenchy’s 4G logo is embossed on the leather. 

The one-minute campaign video shows multiple copies of Walker and Cong, and is edited to look like it was done via a seamless, single take. Williams worked with director Simon Schmitt to achieve the intricate camerawork and Surkin for the techno drone that drives the action.
“I just had seen too many choppy videos and commercials and I wanted to explore one-shot more,” Williams told WWD. “We had that in our [fall] show film with that amazing opening one shot and I’m kind of into exploring that lately.”
Walker, the 22-year-old daughter of late “Fast & Furious” actor Paul Walker, is a friend of Williams’ and she embodies “the energy of a woman that I’m inspired by,” the designer said. “I just really connected with her and loved her energy as a person and wanted her to be a part of the campaign. I love her style and attitude and I think she’s a great ambassador for the brand.”

Model Meadow Walker in a still from Givenchy’s video campaign for the 4G bag. 

In an exclusive interview, Williams talked about his approach to the linchpin leather goods category:
WWD: When designing Givenchy bags, what are your guiding principles?
Matthew Williams: When I’m creating a show, I like a mix of bags that maybe are more traditional, and then bags that can complement the silhouette of the ready-to-wear, or be like extensions of the silhouette. What’s inspiring now, too, is playing with materiality. There are so many possibilities, how you can fabricate materials and also construct bags that can really subvert a traditional handbag. Being at a place like Givenchy, with all its know-how, savoir-faire and craftsmanship, that potential to unlock new languages is really amazing to have at my fingertips.
WWD: Can you give an example of an unexpected material?
M.W.: In the last collection, we made these bags out of bandanas — not that that hasn’t been done before. Also the way the monogram is embossed into the new 4G bag. That’s a modern technique of treating leather.
WWD: Hardware is a specialty of yours. Should we expect that to be a defining feature of handbags during your reign at Givenchy?
M.W.: Definitely. I love hardware and playing with finishes and shapes. Even just the satisfaction of opening and closing the 4G emblem clasp. It has this magnet that kind of finds itself when you open and close it. That’s something we really spent a lot of time kind of obsessing over. Also the feeling of the chain in your hands. I think those little details and unseen features really set one bag apart from another. And we are trying to make these products super timeless and something that can live in the collection for many years.
WWD: We seem to be in a period of logos, monograms and obvious brand signifiers. How do you approach this?
M.W.: I think that the Gs in the chain links are quite subtle: If you didn’t know they were there, you wouldn’t be able to see them. And if you look, throughout my collection, there are squares cut into a lot of the patterns, and appearing as Velcro and trim. So it’s like branding through design and pattern cutting. But as far as logos and monograms go, I think with a luxury house with the heritage that Givenchy has, that’s really natural to have that kind of branding carry through the collection. That’s what other large maisons have as well. I mean, that’s one thing you can’t buy — history.

See also:
Matthew Williams Discusses Alyx, His ‘Life’s Work’

Matthew Williams Zooms to Givenchy

EXCLUSIVE: Matthew Williams’ Debut Collection for Givenchy Is Hitting Stores Early

10 White Sneakers to Up Your Shoe Game with Ease This Summer

10 White Sneakers to Up Your Shoe Game with Ease This Summer

If there’s one thing that has never gone out of style, it’s white sneakers. From Adidas Stan Smith to Golden Goose, and with a little help from our favorite celebs such as Kendall Jenner, Gigi Hadid and Hailey Baldwin, white sneakers are a must have for Spring Summer 2021.
From the classics at Loro Piana, to the chunky “dad” sneakers at Roger Vivier, something floral at Valentino, or futuristic, (we’re looking at you Balenciaga) your sneakers should be fabulous enough to speak for themselves.
Scroll down for our gallery below:
Read Next: Will Balenciaga’s Track Sneakers Be The Next to Reach Cult Status?

Why Are Fashion Designers So Drawn to Rave Culture?

Why Are Fashion Designers So Drawn to Rave Culture?

MILAN — Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons asked electronic music mogul Richie Hawtin, aka Plastikman, to create the soundtracks for the Prada brand’s men’s and women’s fall shows. In particular, in the digital video presenting the women’s collection, models were captured dancing in a dark, techno club-inspired scenario.
MSGM creative director Massimo Giorgetti staged a rave party under the snow for his men’s fall unveiling; Matthew Williams re-created the atmosphere of a techno concert for Givenchy’s digital presentation, and GCDS presented a club-ready lineup with a trippy mood. Meanwhile, in Paris, Coperni brought its guests to the AccorHotels Arena to assist with a parade of club gear featuring techno music as a soundtrack, while newly appointed artistic director Nicolas Di Felice celebrated club culture with his fall collection for Courrèges.

These are just a few examples of the significant, ongoing influence of rave and clubbing culture in the collections presented by a range of fashion houses a year after the breakout of the COVID-19 pandemic, which shook the world, imposed restrictions on individual freedom and asked people to rethink their personal and professional lifestyles.
Escapism had already emerged as a theme in the spring 2021 collections presented last fall as the pandemic raged on. However, if then it was expressed more as sweet nostalgia and the desire for reassurance, a season later, escapism had a harder edge, more subversive in a way and surely more proactive.

“I think the lack of freedom has gone on longer than anyone expected and the novelty of being able to work from home, wear what you like all day and be free of the constraints of ‘the office’ have worn off. People are excited about the return of freedom, meeting others, seeing and being seen. I would expect there to be a rush to engage with the world at large whether that’s through clothing or socially (eating, drinking, clubbing, etc.),” said Professor Carolyn Mair, behavioral psychologist, PhD, author of “The Psychology of Fashion” and founder of Psychology.fashion. “Fashion reflects the zeitgeist. Uninterrupted music and dancing with a lot of other people over a period of time enables us to lose ourselves in the moment. It takes us away from our thoughts outside the rave. It’s akin to listening to an audiobook or reading a book and loosing yourself entirely in the story. This escapism takes our attention away from everyday concerns and responsibilities to focus only on the moment.”

Ottolinger, fall 2021 
Courtesy of Ottolinger

Doris Domoszlai, fashion historian and cofounder of Fashion Forward, a New York-based fashion think tank, also believes that fashion’s new desire for escapism is strongly connected to the lack of freedom we are all experiencing.
“With the world now living through year two of the COVID-19 pandemic, I’m not surprised that many designers have turned to escapism to express their frustrations and hope for the future,” said Domoszlai. “The outdoors and rave culture make sense as venues of escape: they’re literally outside and away, and far more exciting than the closed spaces that we’ve found ourselves in for the past year.”

In particular, Domoszlai reflected on some of the digital shows presented during the fall 2021 fashion weeks.
“Givenchy presented an exciting collection in the kind of warehouse that’s an ode to both the infamous acid raves of the ’90s and also the illegal raves rule breakers have been hosting during the pandemic. The electronic music to which the show is set emphasizes the urgency to escape this dystopian reality,” said Domoszlai, who also drew a link between the GCDS digital presentation and early Aughts’ Millennium Bag and the fear of a digitalized unknown future. “Referencing the infamous scene in ‘The Matrix’ — when the main character Neo chooses to eat a red pill that exposes the cold, hard reality that he’s been blind to — a model eats a red hard candy and literally exposes viewers to a collection that represents the current pandemic-plagued reality that we are living through. Taking place in various outdoor scenes, the GCDS collection is an escape to both the future as it was seen in the past, as well as to all the potential places we can go to get away from our long-term quarantine.”
In addition, Domoszlai spotlighted the digital presentation of Ottolinger, which channeled escapism in an outdoor perspective.
“In their digital presentation, they transport the viewer to an unnamed, futuristic, rocky landscape. This scene, and the activewear-inspired clothing shown within it, simultaneously demonstrate the designers’ need to escape the confines of the closed spaces to which many were relegated because of COVID-19, and the feeling of being lost in uncharted territory as a result of it all,” she said. “The last few words of the soundtrack are very telling. The narrator describes the setting as ‘formerly known as somewhere, now known as nowhere,’ summarizing the disconnect the brand’s designers feel with the world today.”
An interesting fact related to how designers are interpreting escapism is the aforementioned switch from a sugar-coated type of nostalgia seen for the spring collections to the darker, more introspective and probably more rebellious vibe seen for fall.
“Nostalgia is an interesting construct. It is defined as a bittersweet emotion, yet fashion tends to think of it only as ‘sweet.’ When we look back, we do often see the past in a positive light, wishing for the return of a past when things were perceived of as better than they are now. But perception is selective and what we ‘see’ is not all there is,” Mair explained. “The idea of nostalgia triggering positive memories has come about in part through studies in which participants were asked to remember something positive in the past, but more recent studies have led to a different definition. Researchers found that when participants were given an artifact from the past, rather than when they were asked to recall a positive event form the past, it triggered a negative emotion. In sum, nostalgia, like all other psychological constructs, is more complex than it appears on the surface.”

GCDS, fall 2021 
Courtesy of GCDS

Giorgio Riello, professor of early modern global history at Florence’s European University Institute, explained that “this alternation between more nostalgic and more proactive social and cultural responses is recurrent in modern history.”
In particular, Riello pointed out how, after World War II, Christian Dior evoked 19th-century fashion with the launch of the New Look in 1947. But how only a few years later, in the early ’50s, Italian designers proposed a new, more practical and unfussy take on fashion. “I believe that the nostalgic vision is transitory, especially because it normally refers to a vision of the past that in most of the case is not real,” said Riello.
The professor also created a parallel between the global situation during the pandemic, when people are indulging in comfort clothing as they work from home and are restricted in going out, with what happened after World War I.
“Coco Chanel opened her first store in 1913 before the war and with her creations she contributed to developing a more informal and more practical idea of elegant dressing,” Riello said. “However, a few years after the end of World War I, the Roaring Twenties came and they brought a new wave of excess and eccentricity.”
It is a point made by many others, from designers to retailers to financial analysts. With the trillions of dollars pumping through the global financial system, and consumers having spent the last year mainly at home with little chance to spend on travel or restaurants, predictions are that the end of the COVID-19 pandemic will see another ‘Roaring Twenties’ over the next decade. Fashion already is reflecting that for fall, with many designers creating exuberant collections perfect for dressing up to go to a party.
Riello explained that something similar happened after the French Revolution, during the French Directory, when members of Paris’ aristocratic subculture responded to the austerity and terror of the recent past by indulging in luxury and decadence. Called the Incroyables e les Merveilleuses, these men and women welcomed the new regime with hundreds of balls where they used to wear see-through dresses inspired by the ancient Greeks and Romans or wide trousers and huge neckties, bold wigs and giant hats, as well as sandals with ribbons to wrap around the legs.
But why do these different creative responses happen? Because, according to Mair, creativity is a complex construct.
“People we consider, or who consider themselves to be, creative may react to crises and emergencies in many different ways. Nevertheless, crises and emergencies demand the ability to think quickly to produce novel solutions that work. To do this, people need to take new and diverse perspectives to join concepts in novel ways. Not everyone has a natural ability to do this, we need to move away from the idea that creativity resides in the fingertips,” she said. “Creativity is a brain process and so in order to be creative, particularly in times of crisis or emergency, we need to be alert to changes in the situation, to be problem identifiers rather than problem solvers, be able to make good decisions quickly, have good communication, teamwork and leadership skills as well as the ability to stay calm and alert simultaneously.
“To answer the question, creative minds tend to react to crisis and emergencies calmly and decisively, drawing on a range of people they know to be creative thinkers also. They tolerate ambiguity and understand that the best they can hope for in the short term is to find the optimal solution. This will not be the only solution or even the best one possible. Once the crisis or emergency has passed, they review the processes to learn from them so they don’t repeat mistakes in future.”
See also: 
5 Lessons Multibrand Showrooms Learnt During the Pandemic
What Has COVID-19 Really Been Like for the Retail Store Employee?
How Six Female Entrepreneurs Found Success During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Couturier Philippe Venet Dies in Paris at 91

Couturier Philippe Venet Dies in Paris at 91

Philippe Venet, a couturier who shared the refined taste and elegance of his longtime companion of Hubert de Givenchy, died Monday at the American Hospital in Paris at age 91. The cause of death was not disclosed.
A rueful James Taffin de Givenchy, nephew of Hubert de Givenchy and a well-known jewelry designer in New York, confirmed Venet’s passing and said he was on his way to Paris to mourn a man he described as one of the finest tailors in the history of French couture.
Venet famously worked as an assistant to Elsa Schiaparelli from 1951 to 1953, and then worked beside Hubert de Givenchy at his couture house’s “tailleur” atelier through 1962, when Venet launched his own couture house.

“As Monsieur Hubert de Givenchy’s lifelong companion, he helped to build the house into an international force in fashion, and his many contributions remain an essential part of our DNA,” Givenchy said in a statement on Wednesday.
Olivier Gabet, director of the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, said that while Venet’s career largely played out in the shadow of his famous partner, he was prized among many upper-crust women in France and America for his impeccable and discreet couture, hinged largely on daywear.
“He was very famous for his coats in the 1960s” and owning one was a badge of honor for society women, Gabet related. “His clothes were nothing flashy, very discreet and impeccably made.”

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According to Gabet, his devotees included the likes of art patron Hélène David-Weill, French actress Jacqueline Delubac and American society figures Mica Ertegun, Jayne Wrightsman and Marina Kellen French.
Models pose in coats from Philippe Venet’s fall 1982 couture collection.  Guy Marineau/WWD

Les Arts Décoratifs has more than a dozen Venet ensembles in its collection, and Gabet said the designer commanded broad respect in the French fashion firmament.
“Philippe Venet made Parisian couture shine, particularly in the United States, where he remained one of the most appreciated couturiers for a long time,” the Fédération de la Haute Couture et de la Mode said in a tribute.
After training at the École Professionnelle des Tailors de Lyon, Venet began an apprenticeship with a workshop that had the exclusive license to reproduce models from Balenciaga. Later in his career, he developed ready-to-wear, men’s wear, perfumes and accessories, according to the federation.
Taffin de Givenchy recalled that Venet began his studies as a teenager and his flair for tailoring was apparent to all. “He was so good that very early in his apprenticeship he was given all the Balenciaga’s patterns to cut. The word went around of his talent and Schiaparelli wanted to meet him. At the young age of 21 he was hired and given a contract at the famed couture house,” he said. “This is where he met Hubert, who had already been there for for years and was about to leave. Their friendship never faltered.”
In January 1962, Venet shared a page with Yves Saint Laurent in WWD’s preview of the upcoming couture shows that month. “He understands elegance and the elegant,” Thelma Sweetinburgh, WWD’s Paris-based fashion editor, wrote at the time, noting that “he has worked closely with some of the smartest women in the world, including Mrs. Lowell Guinness, whose clothes he cut at Givenchy.”

Laudomia Pucci, who worked in Givenchy’s rtw department in the late 1980s, became close friends with Venet and de Givenchy and described them as a fashion power couple along the lines of Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé, although both were creative gurus with impeccable taste.
“They did everything together, but they kept their two lines separate,” Pucci said, describing their love of decoration, lavish entertaining and gallant holidays. “Philippe was very soft-spoken, but a very witty, clever man.”
Venet was predeceased by Hubert de Givenchy, who died in 2018 at age 91, and is survived by sisters and nephews. It is understood a private service is scheduled for Friday in Paris.

Kendall Jenner, Playboi Carti Styled Themselves in Givenchy’s Spring Campaign

Kendall Jenner, Playboi Carti Styled Themselves in Givenchy’s Spring Campaign

PORTRAIT GALLERY: Celebrity, style thyself.
For his first campaign as creative director of Givenchy, Matthew Williams rang up some of his besties and invited them to put their own stamp on key pieces from his debut spring collection.
Playboi Carti chose a mesh tank top and a dark green leather bomber jacket, letting the latter slip off his shoulder to show off some of his tattoos, while Kendall Jenner, sitting on a cube in a second-skin red top and high-waisted pants, plunked a gold Antigona bag between her legs. Models Bella Hadid, Anok Yai and Liam Powers also posed for Korean-born, German photographer Heji Shin against an array of colored backdrops.
Williams, who is American, was able to fly to New York to attend and supervise the shoot, which referenced 1990s-era editorials while accentuating each individual’s personality and mood.

“My ethos is about the luxury of infusing clothes with your own personality, not being worn by them,” Williams said. “In each of these portraits, a strong character wears a look that reflects who they are: They’re the ones who bring the clothes to life.”
The images are to debut today on Givenchy’s social platforms, then in March issues of major international magazines, and in outdoor placements starting in February.
Among the featured accessories are the CutOut bag, comfy Marshmallow slides and thick chains composed of G-shaped links. Hardware is a key Williams design signature. He also embraced the house’s 4G emblem, which appears on the ads along with the Givenchy signature.
See also:

Matthew Williams is Givenchy’s New Designer

EXCLUSIVE: Matthew Williams’ Debut Collection for Givenchy Is Hitting Stores Early

Matthew Williams Discusses Alyx, His ‘Life’s Work’

Matthew Williams Discusses Alyx, His ‘Life’s Work’

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