Gabriela Hearst

Chloé RTW Fall 2022

Chloé RTW Fall 2022

Here are two little words that lift the spirits, and let’s hope we hear them more in the coming months and years: “Climate success.”
Gabriela Hearst made them the driving idea behind her solid fall 2022 collection for Chloé, expressed very literally on hand-painted bags and intricate intarsia sweaters: one side a brown and withered landscape; the other a verdant vista once nature had been allowed to heal and “re-wild” itself.
“We can think about the apocalypse. We’re seeing the fires, we’re seeing the droughts, we’re seeing the glaciers melting. But we need to start thinking of climate success,” Hearst said during a preview, her arms laden with documents and a thick diary where she catalogues where her ecological crusade intersects with her job as a leading fashion designer.

Hearst mentioned Isabella Tree’s book “Wilding,” in which Tree documents how she rehabilitated her dairy farm so that it became a “paradise where nearly extinct species in the U.K. started returning.” The designer has witnessed the same kind of rebirth at her mother’s ranch in her native Uruguay, and she plans to dedicate each subsequent Chloé collection to a new climate success, the next one being fusion energy.

Watching her models stride in cowboy-like boots over the gravel runway she installed in a greenhouse-like glass box, her eco manifesto was not emblazoned on sleeves — except when a model had a cashmere blanket draped on one arm, these depicting either a wounded or restored natural environment.

What registered was a sleek and sophisticated chic hinged on austere tailoring in flawless leathers and handsome tweeds. Hearst held out hope that her understated brand of mindful power dressing might coax more women into politics at a time when compassionate, clear-headed and selfless leadership is sorely needed.
Hearst pinged between mannish pantsuits and topcoats and her go-to X-silhouette leather dress with scalloped edges. Puffed sleeves on leather dresses added a soft touch, as did her arresting mélange sweaters in recycled cashmere.

Some might say this Chloé collection skewed too close to the aesthetic of Hearst’s signature line, but it’s a quibble when the clothes look this good, and are gentle on the planet to boot.
Hearst casually mentioned that Chloé’s multicolor, platform-soled Nama sneaker, introduced with her spring 2022 collection, has zoomed to become the brand’s number-one-selling shoe. “The fact that we’re changing the volume drivers of the business to a lower-impact means that we’re building it in a better way,” she said. A commercial and climate success, indeed.

The North Face x Gucci Plans Pop-up Shops

The North Face x Gucci Plans Pop-up Shops

THE COLD SHOULDER: For the second installment of its partnership and collaborative collection with The North Face, Gucci is playing up exploration and avant-garde design in a new campaign.That sense of adventure and readiness for any and all weather elements have been pictured in a new campaign that debuts today. Gucci’s creative director, Alessandro Michele, masterminded the campaign that has been photographed and directed by twins Jalan and Jibril Durimel. Christopher Simmons served as the art director, with Thomas De Kluyver handling makeup and Andrea Martinelli in charge of hairstyling.

A look from The North Face x Gucci campaign shot in Iceland.
Jalan and Jibril Durimel/Courtesy of Gucci

The photos and video were shot in Iceland, a country known for its majestic nature. There, models were pictured on various terrains including snow white-covered backdrops, volcanic black sand and more pastural green hills. The Durimels’ imagery is being used for all marketing channels including social media, online and e-commerce. The big-name brands are keeping their outdoorsy photography going — the first campaign was shot by Daniel Shea in the Alps.

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The latest assortment from The North Face x Gucci features insulated jackets, ready-to-wear, backpacks, bomber jackets, vests, hiking boots, luggage and shoes for women and men. Select styles feature the classic GG monogram all over, and there are fresh takes on some of The North Face’s signature looks from the ’90s, which have been reimagined in colorful prints inspired by the Gucci archives.
Next month shoppers in select winter cities will find the collection, which is designed to withstand the elements, in pop-up shops. From Jan. 11 through Jan. 25, there will be outposts in Aspen, Chicago and Toronto. Aspen is a popular destination this season. Gabriela Hearst has unveiled a pop-up in the ski resort town, where the new AspenX label, Citizens of Humanity and Loro Piana Interiors have boutiques.
As a nod to both brands’ environmental efforts, the new line uses Econyl, a trademarked nylon fabric made from regenerated materials like fishing nets. In addition, all of the down insulation that is used in the second go-round meets certification for the Responsible Down Standard by Control Union.
Shoppers won’t miss the vibrant pink packaging for the line, featuring The North Face x Gucci logo. All of the paper and cardboard that is used comes from from sustained managed forest sources. An uncoated paper was used to make it fully recyclable. Another indicator of the eco-minded approach is the fact that boxes are designed with handles to avoid the need for shopping bags.
There is no word yet when the last season is slated for and whether an extension of the collaboration is being considered.

How to Buy a Sustainable Wedding Dress in 2021

How to Buy a Sustainable Wedding Dress in 2021

From the eco-conscious brands you need on your radar to purchasing a vintage or pre-owned wedding dress — here’s what you should know.
Tess van Zalinge. Photographed by Vivian Hoorn
While large-scale weddings are not currently possible due to Covid-19 restrictions, many couples have opted for smaller, more intimate affairs instead. And with in-person fittings mostly off the cards, many brides have been rethinking their wedding dresses, including opting for more low-key — and sustainable — choices for their big day. 
Despite not having a specific bridal line, eco-conscious brand Maggie Marilyn has certainly seen more interest from brides in her ready-to-wear pieces since the pandemic began. “With everything going on in the world right now, there is an element of brides toning it down a little bit, which feels fresh and modern,” the brand’s founder Maggie Hewitt tells Vogue. “Brides are choosing to wear pieces that align with their values when they get married, too, which is exciting.” 
Maggie Marilyn. Photographed by Peter Van Alpen
For those looking for a more traditional wedding gown, vintage has also become an increasingly popular choice for eco-minded brides. Lyst reported that searches for vintage wedding dresses were up by a staggering 297% in the 48 hours after Princess Beatrice opted to borrow a 1960s Norman Hartnell dress from her grandmother, the Queen, for her wedding in July 2020.
Rental and upcycling are also on the rise, as brides become increasingly conscious of the environmental impact of a dress that you only wear once. Here is Vogue’s ultimate guide to sustainable wedding dresses in 2021. 
Sustainable wedding dress brands to know 
Designers such as Stella McCartney and Gabriela Hearst — both known for their sustainable practices — are obvious places to start your wedding dress hunt, but it’s also worth trying Maggie Marilyn, Mother of Pearl, and Reformation if you’re looking for a more relaxed option. 
Cecilie Bahnsen Encore. Photo: Courtesy of Cecilie Bahnsen
In fact, going for a style that “you can wear again and again” will only boost the dress’s sustainability credentials, Hewitt adds. That’s why Cecilie Bahnsen’s Encore range — made from leftover materials — is another fantastic option, featuring intricately crafted pieces that can be worn on your big day and beyond (especially when parties are finally allowed again). 
Vintage and pre-owned wedding dresses
By wearing vintage on your wedding day, you’re not only extending the life of a pre-existing dress — it’s also likely to be a one-of-a-kind piece, making it an extra special choice. “It’s about customers wanting to make more meaningful purchases and wearing something unique; something with a story on their special day,” explains Marie Blanchet, founder and CEO of Mon Vintage. 
With so much choice out there, it helps to narrow down what you’re looking for. Styles from the 1960s are trending at the moment, according to Blanchet, while other brides are opting for old-school Hollywood glamour from the 1930s and 1940s. The white pantsuit, too, is having somewhat of a resurgence thanks to the rise of the micro-wedding. Look for a vintage specialist who will tailor the pieces to your measurements, advises the expert, adding that it’s better to buy a piece that’s too big than too small. 
If you’re looking for a modern pre-owned option, try bridal-specific marketplaces such as Still White and Brides Do Good, as well as resale sites like The RealReal and Vestiaire Collective. There you’ll find gowns by the likes of Carolina Herrera and Emilia Wickstead, all for a fraction of the price of a brand new wedding dress. 
Mother of Pearl. Photo: Courtesy of Mother of Pearl
Renting a wedding dress 
With rental fashion on the rise in recent years, it’s no surprise that more brides are considering renting a dress as their ‘something borrowed’. “It makes so much sense to rent if it’s just for that one day,” says Eshita Kabra-Davies, founder and CEO of rental app By Rotation, which now sees past brides loaning out their own wedding dresses (Cecilie Bahnsen, Jacquemus and Ganni are all popular options). 
If you can’t find your dream dress to rent, it’s definitely worth considering borrowing your wedding day accessories instead — whether that’s a Simone Rocha handbag or a Shrimps faux-pearl headband to finish off your look.
Tess van Zalinge. Photographed by Vivian Hoorn
How to upcycle your wedding dress 
While wedding dresses typically end up in a box at the back of people’s wardrobes, many brides are now contemplating how they can give their gowns a second life. Bridal designer Alice Temperley has shown how to dye her dresses using natural materials while rising brands such as Wed Studio and Tess van Zalinge are turning old pieces into modern separates that can be worn day to day.
Ultimately, it’s about reducing waste as much as possible. As Van Zalinge explains, “You could buy a dress that you’re going to wear for just one day, but you have to think about what you could do with it afterwards.” 
Read Next: 10 Little White Dresses to Gleam in Like Dua Lipa This Summer
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

Everything You Need to Know About Vogue’s Forces of Fashion This Year

Everything You Need to Know About Vogue’s Forces of Fashion This Year

This year, Vogue’s Forces of Fashion event will be a virtual affair, held on July 7 and 8. Titled “Fashion Goes Forward,” the event will feature many notable speakers and panel discussions that you won’t want to miss. (So make sure to book those tickets early!)
Over the course of two days, a number of the fashion industry’s leading designers and icons will sit down for thought-provoking conversations. Highlights include a special panel discussion with Vogue’s Anna Wintour, British Vogue’s Edward Enninful, Vogue China’s Margaret Zhang, and Vogue Runway’s Luke Leitch, who will all offer an exclusive behind-the-scenes look at what goes into making Vogue’s global titles.
Award-winning musician Billie Eilish and Gucci visionary creative director Alessandro Michele will also be in conversation with Vogue’s Chioma Nnadi to discuss how they’ve shaped their respective industries. Designers such as Marc Jacobs, Balenciaga’s Demna Gvasalia, Maison Margiela’s John Galliano, and Chloé’s Gabriela Hearst will all speak as well. Topics in the panels will range from what it takes to build a brand with impeccable authenticity to what goes into making it as a top fashion stylist.
All these panels will be done in English and available to watch live or on demand after the event until July 29. So what are you waiting for? Tickets, which come in several tiers, are available on the Forces of Fashion website now. (The all-access tickets are already sold out, so act fast.) Click here for the full lineup.
Read Next: Precious Lee Stars on Our Body Positivity Issue in an Ode to Real Diversity and Empowerment
Originally published on Vogue.com

Gabriela Hearst Explains Chloé’s ‘Radical’ Instagram Imagery

Gabriela Hearst Explains Chloé’s ‘Radical’ Instagram Imagery

“I wanna see bags and dresses, not bees,” reads one comment on Chloé’s Instagram account, which was recently scrubbed clean to make way for a “radical visual narrative,” so far focused on insects, plants, fruits — and the occasional freckled nose.
To be sure, some of the French brand’s 9.5 million followers on the photo-sharing platform wondered if its account had been hacked, with users describing the nature closeups as “super strange,” “stupid” or “weird.”
One simply asked, “Why?”
Over Zoom on Friday, Chloé’s creative director Gabriela Hearst cited a deep and ambitious reason: A wish to rewire people’s brains and reconnect them to all the things the planet gives us.
“It’s healing,” she said. “I feel that it’s doing something we never thought could do on social media. It does have this healing vision for the eyes, as we go through the journey together of understanding where things come from.”

This image on Chloé’s Instagram was captioned “the beating of oars, just out of sync. beauty’s asymmetry.” 
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Hearst explained that she’s building up to showing actual products in a third phase of the visual story, but for now she’s letting Zoë Ghertner’s photos — a praying mantis here, a ladybug visiting a tiny flower there — remind us that without the natural world, there would be no raw materials for fashion, the focus of the second phase.
“We have to go back to respecting products, we have to go back to respecting objects, but we cannot go back if we don’t respect the source that is giving it to us,” she said in an interview.

A pioneer of sustainable luxury who grew up on a ranch in Uruguay, Hearst is bringing her eco convictions to Chloé as it pursues a new purpose-driven business model prioritizing environmental and social good.
The designer was as cryptic about the timing of the forthcoming phases as some of the captions on the photos (“blood spilled on ice, a love letter singed, some kind of elaborate raspberry coffee cake, who really knows?” reads one under an image of a crackled, pink-tinged surface. A muffin top perhaps?).
Indeed, Hearst only dropped one hint about future posts: “The eruption of the volcano in Iceland has been shot for this Instagram. It’s so beautiful and so breathtaking,” she enthused.

A closeup of a mushroom on Chloé’s Instagram feed. 
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The designer shrugged at the confounded users — some going so far as to express disgust — as proof of how estranged some people are from nature. “We are actually gaining followers,” she said with a smile.
On a lighter note, she was heartened to see how popular raspberries and grapefruits are — garnering around 15,000 likes — while she roots for the pollinators, languishing at about 7,000 likes.
“You will get to see bags and dresses,” she said, “but there wouldn’t be bags and dresses if there were no bees.
“To see nature in all its magnificence is something that I’m excited to see on Instagram,” she continued. “I grew up looking at National Geographic, which is my main inspiration. And we used to save those magazines. In my lifetime, we’ve gone from saving magazines to just throwing magazines. It’s just about this appreciation of where things come from.”
She noted that the old posts have been archived, and the decision to scrub the account for the new imagery was made only after Hearst and her team discovered the Ghertner images and Peter Miles’ art direction.

“We were all taken by how beautiful everything looked together, and we realized that it would be very confusing to have both,” she said. “One thing we’re looking for is clarity in this world. And so it was more clear to do it like this, and to celebrate nature in this first chapter.”
Designer brands have been taking more risks on Instagram lately, with Bottega Veneta deleting its account last January without explanation.
SEE ALSO:
Gabriela Hearst on How She’s Working to ‘Make Sustainability Sexy’
EXCLUSIVE: Chloé Quietly Shifts to Purpose-Driven Business Model
Gabriela Hearst and Chloé Go Way Back

Gabriela Hearst Named Creative Director of Chloé

Gabriela Hearst Named Creative Director of Chloé

Gabriela Hearst. Photo: Courtesy of Chloé

Gabriela Hearst, the Uruguay-born, New York–based designer whose eponymous label turned five this year, is the new creative director of Chloé. CEO Riccardo Bellini welcomed her in a statement this morning.
Hearst is the first non-European to hold this post (Natacha Ramsay-Levi’s exit was announced last week). Her craft-forward aesthetic meshes with Chloé’s, but what likely sealed the deal for Hearst was her sustainability bona fides. Last month in an interview with WWD, Bellini indicated that Chloé was seeking B Corporation certification for its social and environmental performance and creating an advisory board to hold the company accountable. “What a brand stands for, its beliefs and values, will become as relevant as products and aesthetics,” he said. For many brands sustainability has become a talking point, but Hearst’s appointment cements Chloé as one of the most environmentally minded luxury goods companies in the world.
Hearst’s first runway show for fall 2017 was produced to have as low as an environmental impact as possible, and from there her commitment to the issue has only grown. Now, she sources deadstock materials, opts for eco-friendly fabrics like linen and cuts out more damaging ones such as cotton, and chooses to use recycled yarns whenever she can.
Recycled cashmere, as it turns out, feels just as luxurious as virgin cashmere. In fact, most customers would be hard pressed to tell the difference. Hearst’s savvy was in communicating around the subject and becoming a thought leader on the issue. Environmental awareness is her brand’s point of difference. It won her a minority investment from LVMH’s venture arm early last year, and in September of this year, she picked up the CFDA’s Womenswear Designer prize.
“I am grateful for an opportunity at such a beloved brand as Chloé,” Hearst said in a statement. “I am thankful to Natacha Ramsay-Levi and all the other extraordinary designers that have come before her and helped build on the purposeful vision of Gaby Aghion. I am excited for the opportunity to work under the leadership of Riccardo Bellini and support him in his commitment to create a business that is socially conscious and in balance with our environment.”
Hearst will continue to design the Gabriela Hearst line and plans to split her time between New York and Paris, the pandemic notwithstanding. Her first collection for Chloé will be presented next March.
Read Next: Chloé Spring 2021 Brings Hope for the New World From the Old World
Originally published on Vogue.com

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