FW21

Inside Tory Burch’s New Mercer Street Boutique with Palestinian Model Maria Alia

Inside Tory Burch’s New Mercer Street Boutique with Palestinian Model Maria Alia

Maria Alia. Photo: Morgan Maher for Tory Burch
Invigorated by nostalgia while looking ahead, Tory Burch marked the opening of its new store with an SS22 runway show honoring 20th century sportswear designer Claire McCardell. Strategically located in the heart of Manhattan on Mercer Street, this new boutique symbolizes the American fashion designer’s love for the bustling city. In 2004, she moved to SoHo after college and opened her first boutique not too far from the same street.
Photo: Morgan Maher for Tory Burch
“I could not be more excited about our Mercer Street store,” says Burch. “It is an evolution of our retail aesthetic, and I have loved the creative process, combining a modern space with signature decorative elements and details that are personal to me. The downtown location feels like a homecoming, just a five-minute walk from where we opened our first boutique on Elizabeth Street.”
Photo: Morgan Maher for Tory Burch
Besides the label’s signature clothing, shoes, and handbags, the boutique’s diverse offerings include home goods, new 151 Mercer handbags, as well as limited-edition Lee Radziwill Double Bags, exclusive to this location. They are displayed within elements recalling Burch’s childhood memories, such as the baskets suspended from the ceilings which represent the ones in her Pennsylvanian home growing up.
Photo: Morgan Maher for Tory Burch
For other highlights of the store, Burch enlisted female artists, including Miranda Brooks, who created an outdoor garden space behind the store, and a chandelier suspended in the second-floor shoe salon by sculptor Francesca DiMattio. The brand’s codes – oak, rattan, and brass – have also been reimagined in different finishes throughout the boutique, while the underside of the staircase has been lined with a hand-hammered metalwork Tree of Life to symbolize renewal and growth.
Photo: Morgan Maher for Tory Burch
One of the store’s more stylish visitors, Brooklyn-based Palestinian model Maria Alia recently toured the location, dressed in key pieces from the brand’s FW21 collection. Inspired by the classic New York neighborhoods and the city’s attitude, pieces feature prints that pay tribute to its various cultures in earthy neutral shades with pops of color like red and purple. The collection is created with the foundations of a seasonless wardrobe, with pieces that can be dressed up or down, and styled modestly as shown by Alia, regardless of the time they’re worn in.
Photo: Morgan Maher for Tory Burch
Read Next: 25 Uplifting Spring 2022 Looks from New York Fashion Week

Massimo Dutti FW21 Limited Edition Offers a Fresh Take on Seasonal Staples

Massimo Dutti FW21 Limited Edition Offers a Fresh Take on Seasonal Staples

Photo: Courtesy of Massimo Dutti
Look no further than Massimo Dutti‘s FW21 Limited Edition collection for new forever favorites this season. Offering a fresh take on fall and winter wardrobe staples, the collection was created with a modern and avant garde point of view while keeping the brand’s signature codes intact.
Photo: Courtesy of Massimo Dutti
At the core of womenswear is a unique synergy between minimalism and romanticism – think defined silhouettes and delicate fabrics in nature-inspired colors that evoke both sophistication and femininity. In keeping with urban style, the collection features structured materials, nods to craftsmanship, and mainly monotoned pieces. Coats are a highlight, alongside flowing blouses with ties, dresses, high boots, and sandals that add a cosmopolitan twist. Statement accessories offered include a large woven bag made of handcrafted natural leather and gold-plated cascading earrings for a touch of opulence.
Photo: Courtesy of Massimo Dutti
The menswear collection features experimental reinterpretations of formal pieces by combining fashion and architecture in a series of minimal designs. Rooted in sophistication, knit wool blazers, high neck sweaters, corduroy trousers, and down parkas make up the collection. With the exception of statement burgundy and blue sweaters, the pieces offer versatility in a range of neutral colors, from cream and beige to navy and black.
Photo: Courtesy of Massimo Dutti
Massimo Dutti FW21 Limited Edition collection is now available to shop in selected stores, online, and via the Massimo Dutti app for iOS and Android devices. 
Read Next: Inside the Harithand Fall 2021 Collection Everyone Wants to Wear

34 Wedding Dress Ideas from the FW21 Couture Shows

34 Wedding Dress Ideas from the FW21 Couture Shows

Chanel FW21 couture. Photo: Go Runway
With real life shows (oh hi, FROW) and an abundance of romance on the runways, the FW21 couture season didn’t pull any punches when it came to show-stopping gowns or knife-sharp tailoring. Brides who have endured the anguish of serial postponements or stalled planning over the past 18 months can take comfort in the knowledge that the world’s greatest designers are championing a bold new era in matrimonial dress, destined to inspire an exultant return to IRL wedding celebrations.    
What to want now? Tough call. We’d place our bets on a worldwide sweep of ornately regal Bridgerton-esque dresses, were it not also for Balenciaga’s imposingly modernist tact (ideal for any bride wary of covert social media coverage) or the sheer drama of Schiaparelli’s deliciously voluminous proportions. Giambattista Valli, true to form, delivered blockbuster frou capable of charming those who always swear they’re minimalists at heart, while over at Fendi, Kim Jones crafted a line-up of modern classics –– think subtle asymmetry and sinuous cuts. Crucially, FW21 couture is also shaping up to be a vintage year for superlative tailored looks, with luxuriously trim suiting challenging the dominance of sweeping gowns.
From sumptuous adornment to abbreviated hemlines, this is your rundown of the best wedding looks to grace the FW21 couture runways.

Abbreviated Hemlines

Modern Classica

Regal Adornment

Sheer

The new simplicity

Tailoring

Textures and trimmings

Volume

Read Next: The Best Modest Looks Seen at Couture Week Fall/Winter 21-22

5 Things to Know About Marc Jacobs’s Exuberant FW21 Show

5 Things to Know About Marc Jacobs’s Exuberant FW21 Show

Photo: Courtesy of Marc Jacobs
Marc Jacobs last presented a collection in February 2020 – his fall/winter 2020 runway spectacular memorably featured Bella Hadid and Kaia Gerber in Jackie O mode, as well as a cameo from Miley Cyrus. On Monday he came back with a bang, staging a physical show at the New York Public Library that was a colorful ode to the designer’s enduring passion for fashion and creativity. Below, five things to know about the show.
Photo: Courtesy of Marc Jacobs
It was about happiness
The press notes opened with a single word: happiness. “On the journey back to doing what we love most, in the wake of immeasurable loss, loneliness, fear, anxiety and uncertainty, I am reminded of why creativity is so vital to our existence,” Jacobs said. “To life.” Having swerved the digital presentations adopted by many of his peers over the past 18 months, the designer staged his first Covid-era showcase on a real runway, with a real – albeit small – audience (all guests had presented proof of vaccination). The show was also beamed onto the facade of Bergdorf Goodman for all of Manhattan to see, part of Jacobs’s efforts to create a “shared experience”, and offer a much-needed “moment of inspiration, curiosity, wonder and possibility”. Mission accomplished.
Photo: Courtesy of Marc Jacobs
It featured a clutch of supers
Beneath the snug beanies, inflated hoods and voluminous snoods, onlookers could discern the unmistakable features of the new-gen supers. Imaan Hammam’s camel skirt and chunky red roll neck with gently elongated sleeves was styled with prim ankle socks and platform Mary-Janes, while Gigi Hadid sported the shimmering paillettes that were a recurring theme of the collection.
Photo: Courtesy of Marc Jacobs
The silhouettes were dramatic 
Jacobs’s celebration of joy and creativity manifested in graphic logos, geometric prints and a rainbow of colour. The collection nodded to the functional with giant puffer collars and quilted snoods, but added a playful formalwear spin courtesy of trailing faux fur stoles and opera gloves. The platform Mary-Janes that accompanied each look were exactly what you’d expect from a man who wore disco boots to get his Covid jabs.
Photo: Courtesy of Marc Jacobs
There were party-ready paillettes…
What will life look like by fall? God and Professor Chris Whitty willing, our social lives might actually be back in full swing, in which case, what better way to rise to the occasion than in Jacobs’s jumbo paillettes, which decorated dresses worn over snug knits and flared trousers?
Photo: Courtesy of Marc Jacobs
… But also extreme puffers
The injection of shimmer, and a selection of flesh-baring cut-out bodysuits, nodded to our re-emergence wardrobes, but the collection also reflected fashion’s recent obsession with all things functional. Duvet coats were amped up with bold prints and ample hoods perfect for anyone harbouring a secret desire to keep social distancing forever.
Read Next: 8 Gleaming Green Dresses to Channel Yasmine Sabri in Lake Como, Italy
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

Everything You Need to Know About the FW21 Haute Couture Shows

Everything You Need to Know About the FW21 Haute Couture Shows

Photo: Daniel Roseberry/ Courtesy of Schiaparelli
While much of the fashion industry has endured disruptions throughout the pandemic, haute couture has persevered and is brimming with sensational moments to come. The upcoming FW21 schedule, from July 5 to 8, is jam-packed with not only the usual big-hitters, but also fresh talent, broadening the spectrum of the oldest and most prestigious of fashion weeks. 
The history of haute couture 
Just after the war, in 1945, the most revered of maisons — including Chanel, Christian Dior, Schiaparelli and Givenchy — were invited by the Chambres Syndicales to present couture collections. Members were expected to create one-of-a-kind pieces adhering to specific rules, including excellence in creativity, painstaking detail and a minimum number of hours spent making the creations, in order to qualify for the schedule. Since the first event, couture week has made its mark on fashion history with exquisite pieces and enchanting spectacles — Versace’s high-octane FW95 show rife with dazzling supermodel glamour and Chanel’s FW13 post-apocalypse presentation spring to mind.
This season, expect a mixture of major physical and virtual moments. Storied houses such as Dior, Chanel and Jean Paul Gaultier, whose collaboration with Sacai’s Chitose Abe (the first in a series of  guest designers), and Balenciaga, set to make its hotly anticipated return to the haute couture schedule after 53 years of absence, have opted to present live shows to a limited guestlist. Fendi, Maison Margiela and Schiaparelli, meanwhile, are sticking to a digital showcase. 
Other unmissable moments include New York-based label Pyer Moss’s virtual inaugural couture presentation, making creative director Kerby Jean-Raymond the first Black American designer to show on the schedule. Young designer Charles De Vilmorin’s second couture collection will also be shown digitally. Away from the official line-up, creative director Pieter Mulier — Raf Simons’ right-hand man at Jil Sander, Dior and Calvin Klein — presents his first collection at the Alaïa Maison (remember how warm and humble he came across in the 2014 Dior And I documentary? Yes, we fell in love with him then, too). And, how can we forget Valentino, which will be showing its collection to a live audience, several days after the official schedule concludes, in Venice? 
Who said there could be too many fashion moments? No one, ever. So take your FROW seat in your lounge for the fantasy and theatre of haute couture here.
Read Next: Inside Gucci’s Dream-Like Presentation of its Nature-Inspired High Jewelry Collection

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