Ford GT

A Rare First-Generation Ford GT With Just 50 Miles on the Odometer Is Now for Sale

A Rare First-Generation Ford GT With Just 50 Miles on the Odometer Is Now for Sale

If you prefer the first-generation Ford GT to the second, you’re in luck. Very big luck.

A dazzling red-and-white example of the first iteration of the Detroit giant’s retro-inspired supercar was just listed for sale by Sarchione Auto Gallery in Canton, Ohio, according to DuPont Registry. While any Ford GT being listed for sale is noteworthy, this 2006 model is especially desirable because of the number on the odometer: 50.

First unveiled in concept form in 2002, the Ford GT was meant as both a celebration of the brand’s centenary and a tribute to the car that brought it its biggest success on the track—the original Ford GT40. That’s the car that allowed the American automaker to finally beat Ferrari, won Le Mans four times in a row and inspired a movie you may have heard of. It’s also exceedingly rare, with only 4,038 built during the two years it was in production. A second generation, which is now in its final year of production, was introduced in 2017.

Inside the Ford GT 

Sarchione Auto Gallery

Ford really outdid itself with its first supercar. The Ford GT looks remarkably similar to the GT40. Designed Camilo Pardo wisely held on to the racer’s curvaceous body—just look at its long nose, sculpted hood and large rear fenders—though the newer vehicle is bigger, specifically three inches taller. Despite staying true to the essence of the original, the car—finished in Mark IV Red offset by white racing stripes and Ford decals—feels thoroughly modern, even when compared to its bolder predecessor. This same feeling is maintained inside the car. There’s no giant infotainment screen, like on the second-gen model, but everything is covered in Ebony Black and music comes courtesy of a luxe McIntosh audio system.
Just as beautiful as the exterior is the powerplant that keeps the Ford GT going. Mounted mid-rear is a 5.4-liter supercharged V-8 that is mated to a Ricardo six-speed transaxle manual gearbox that sends power to the the rear axle. It can produce 550 hp and 500 ft lbs of torque, allowing the car to rocket from zero to 62 mph in 3.8 seconds and hit a top speed of 205 mph. Not bad for a vehicle inspired by one of the greatest race cars of all time. This particular example has spent its entire life in a climate controlled garage and barely been driven—again, there’s just 50 miles on the odometer!—so it’s in immaculate condition.

2006 Ford GT 

Sarchione Auto Gallery

Of course, because it doesn’t have any real wear and tear on it, it won’t come cheap. Sarchione Auto Gallery has its Ford GT listed at $685,000. We’re guessing someone will be more than willing to pay that for such a special American speed machine.

Ford Unveils a New GT Heritage Edition to Honor Its 1966 Le Mans Win

Ford Unveils a New GT Heritage Edition to Honor Its 1966 Le Mans Win

Production of the Ford GT will end later this year, but not before the automaker spends a little more time paying tribute to the past.

The Detroit giant unveiled the 2022 GT Alan Mann Heritage Edition on Tuesday morning days before the car will make its public debut at this year’s Chicago Auto Show. The exclusive variant is based on by two lightweight GT40 Mk II prototypes built by Alan Mann Racing that helped inform the final Mk II that was victorious at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1966.

Alan Mann Racing was one of the more successful British outfits of the 1960s and would eventually become an official Ford-backed team. In the lead up to the 1965 and 1966 installments of the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the team built a pair of lightweight experimental prototypes, according to a press release. Neither car won a major race but they inspired Ford to use lightweight materials in the victorious GT Mk II.

One of the original Alan Mann Racing prototypes 

Ford

Like the original prototypes, the Heritage Edition features a racing-style livery inspired by Alan Mann Racing’s trademark red and gold colors. The exterior is accented with shots of white, including a no. 16 gumball, exposed carbon fiber and special “Ford” badging. The cabin is mainly done up in black, though there are flashes of red and gold, as well as more exposed carbon fiber on the Alcantara-wrapped racing seats. The car rides on a set of 20-inch wheels which house Brembo brakes with red and black accents. In the engine bay, you’ll find the same twin-turbocharged 3.5-liter V-6 engine you’ll find in the other 2022 models, which is capable of spitting out 660 horses and 550 ft lbs of twist.
“It’s a great honor for Alan Mann Racing and the Mann family to celebrate the epic motorsports heritage of Ford GT with this fantastic limited-edition car,” the team’s current director, Henry Mann, said in a statement. “To see the red and gold colors of our team’s livery come back to life, and to debut this new GT alongside one of our original GT40s in Chicago, will be a magical occasion.”

Inside the GT Alan Mann Heritage Edition 

Ford

The latest GT variant is the seventh Heritage Edition that has been released since Ford brought back the supercar in 2006. With production of this iteration slated to end later this year, it could be the last. Ford hasn’t announced how many examples will be built or how much they will cost, but we’d be willing to bet they go for a fair bit more than the vehicle’s already sky-high starting price of around $500,000.

History, even just a reference to it, doesn’t come cheap.
Check out more photos of the GT Alan Mann Heritage Edition below:

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Car of the Week: This 2005 Ford GT Checks the Boxes for Speed, Stealth and Style

Car of the Week: This 2005 Ford GT Checks the Boxes for Speed, Stealth and Style

I remember hopping into a brand-new Ford GT back in 2005. It was red, low, quick and loud. There was a lot to like about that car. It felt brutally honest and a little raw, with none of the fussy details or delicate build of the era’s Italian supercars. It didn’t feel like parts would fall off, but it wasn’t like one of Germany’s rolling bank vaults, either. It just felt American. The engine was sublime, but booby-trapped. Forgetting it was supercharged, I planted my foot and did a pirouette in the middle of an intersection while attempting a left-hand turn from standstill. Embarrassing, but the only thing damaged was my pride. The Ford GT commands respect.

When I first encountered the Ford GT, I couldn’t help but feel like I’d reconnected with an old friend after decades of being apart . . . one who’d gained considerable inches and many pounds, but otherwise looked much the same. Dwarfing its predecessor and three inches taller, the Ford GT made no pretense of being a racing machine like the car that inspired it. Credit for such a successful variation on the theme of the original Ford GT40 goes to Camilo Pardo, who, under the direction of J Mays, designed an homage to Ford’s 1-2-3 sweep of Le Mans in 1966 and the marque’s consecutive victories from 1967 to 1969.

The 2005 Ford GT being presented by Gooding & Company. 

Photo by Brian Henniker, courtesy of Gooding & Company.

The tribute concept was unveiled at the 2002 Detroit Auto Show to great acclaim, with a production version following to coincide with Ford’s centenary. Ford’s GT was a home run for the company, with a total of 4,038 examples built—all model year 2005 and 2006.
Few people at the time could have imagined that these would become first-class collectibles 15 years on, but their performance on the auction ramp has been consistent, thanks to strong interest and the inherent drivability—and reliability—of the model. Solid values can also be attributed to Pardo’s artful styling, one that captures the essence of Ford’s racing icon without any hint of retro-kitsch. In other words, it’s an enduring design.

The Ford GT features a lightweight aluminum space frame with aluminum bodywork. 

Photo by Brian Henniker, courtesy of Gooding & Company.

Arguably the first modern supercar from the US, the Ford GT was built up from a lightweight aluminum space frame with aluminum bodywork; notably a passenger cell bookended by two clamshells. Mounted mid-rear is a 550 hp, 5.4-liter V-8—with the aforementioned supercharger—mated to a Ricardo six-speed transaxle. The power-to-weight ratio and exceptional balance make the Ford GT, weighing in at less than 3,500 pounds, a rewarding car to drive, and a reminder that the more analog a vehicle is, the more fun it can be.

Mounted mid-rear is a 550 hp, 5.4-liter supercharged V-8. 

Photo by Brian Henniker, courtesy of Gooding & Company.

Many colorways were offered—most with racing stripes—including the GT Heritage Edition, which was liveried in Gulf Oil motorsport colors and of which 346 were made. This all-black example, however, is particularly stealthy, with forged aluminum wheels punctuated by grey-painted calipers. And the black-leather interior features a McIntosh sound system, one of the few options that could be selected. Delivered new to Mel Clayton Ford in Santa Barbara, Calif., the car shows fewer than 2,000 miles.

The black-leather interior includes a McIntosh sound system. 

Photo by Brian Henniker, courtesy of Gooding & Company.

Estimated to fetch between $350,000 and $400,000, the car will be made available through Gooding & Company during its Geared Online Scottsdale Edition auction. “In recent years, we have noticed a steady increase in demand for first-series Ford GTs,” says Justin Gosaynie, a Gooding & Company Specialist. “This striking, highly collectible stripe-delete Ford GT presents a rare opportunity to interested parties, especially considering its low mileage, single-owner status, special features and attractive color combination.” Online bidding opens Monday, January 24 and begins closing Friday, January 28.

Post Malone’s Car Collection Now Includes a Brand-New White Ford GT

Post Malone’s Car Collection Now Includes a Brand-New White Ford GT

Post Malone’s carefully curated car collection just got a little bigger. And the latest entry might be the coolest yet.

The “Sunflower” singer, whose real name is Austin Post, just unveiled his latest toy—a new white-over-black, second-generation Ford GT. In addition to being a true automotive marvel, the supercar is yet more proof that Malone is one of the more discerning celebrity car collectors out there.

Post shared an image of his new car on Instagram on Wednesday, just days after it made its public debut in a video posted to YouTube by TheStradman. In the video, the popular car vlogger, and Post’s dad, Rich, takes viewers on a tour of the singer’s sub-collection of all white vehicles, which includes the very first Shelby F-150 Super Snake, a Lamborghini Aventador SV Roadster, a limited-edition white-on-white Bugatti Chiron and the new GT.

While each of those vehicles is enviable for different reasons, it’s the newest member of the group that really caught our attention. The GT’s contrasting Frozen White-over-Dark Energy color scheme gives its ultra-aerodynamic body an even more futuristic look than usual, especially when the car is lowered into Race Mode.
Just as noteworthy is the 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6 that powers the mid rear-engine speed machine. Mated to a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission that delivers power to the rear wheels, the mill is capable of generating 647 horses and 550 ft lbs of twist. The supercar can also launch from zero to 60 in less than three seconds and has a top speed of 216 mph. Of course, that’s to be expected of a vehicle inspired by one of the most famous race cars of all time.
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The GT is yet more proof that Post—or his father, who reportedly oversees his collection—has pretty respectable taste in cars. In addition to the four-vehicle all-white set, the singer has also been the proud owner of one of Hennessey’s supercharged VelociRaptor 6×6s and a one-of-three McLaren Senna XP “Master of Monaco” edition.

Here’s What the Very First Ford GT Studio Collection Looks Like

Here’s What the Very First Ford GT Studio Collection Looks Like

As the Ford GT inches closer to its final days on the production line, the Detroit automaker seems to be doing everything it can to send its high-performance sports car off in style.
On Monday, Ford unveiled the first of 40 Studio Collection variants the automaker will build during the vehicle’s final two years of production. What makes this version of the speedster so exclusive? It’s the most customizable Ford GT yet.

The first 2021 Ford GT Studio Collection variant  Ford

Announced last August alongside the GT40 Mark II-inspired Heritage Edition, the limited-edition Studio Collection variant will give owners even more say over the look of their car thanks to an all-new graphics package from Ford Performance and Ford GT manufacturer, Multimatic. The package, which includes racing stripes and other custom accents, allows you to dress up one of the car’s eight standard colors, resulting in a more personalized GT.

The first of the Studio Collection GTs feature an elegant Shadow Black paint job that’s been offset with a single, bold Competition Orange racing stripe down the middle and matching accents around the car’s air intakes. The custom touches make the 647 hp supercar look even more menacing.
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“The combination of the stripes and accents invokes the emotion of speed and draws your eye to some of the most prominent features of the GT,” Multimac design head Garen Nicoghosian said of the graphics package last summer. “The fuselage, buttresses and signature features on the headlights provide visual anchors for the graphics, guiding your eye across the vehicle.”
Ford will build 20 Studio Collection variants this year and 20 more in 2022, the Ford GT’s last year of production. Of the seven special editions of the vehicle introduced over the last five years, it is the second-most rare, following only the Liquid Carbon variant, which was limited to just 12 units. The automaker hasn’t revealed just how much the Sports Collection costs, but based on its exclusivity, we wouldn’t be surprised if it starts well north of the car’s normal $500,000 sticker price.

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