Food

7 Steps to Cooking Scrambled Eggs That Taste Better Than Your Favorite Brunch Spot

7 Steps to Cooking Scrambled Eggs That Taste Better Than Your Favorite Brunch Spot

This is a good time to add in some salt and pepper (about 1/2 teaspoon of salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper per two eggs), so the seasonings can get evenly distributed among the eggs. You can also mix in 2 to 3 tablespoons (per two eggs) of whole milk, heavy cream or creme fraiche to make the texture more velvety, Bearss says. “This will be enough to bring creaminess and airiness to the eggs but not so much that you’re eating cream of egg soup.”And if you wanna do a super pro move, you can also blend up the eggs with an immersion blender, Kevin Templeton, executive chef of Barleymash in San Diego, tells SELF. That’ll incorporate even more air, making your eggs—you guessed it—even fluffier.3. Warm your pan and add your fat.It’s important to get your pan ready while you’re prepping your eggs, so the mixture will start cooking as soon as it hits the pan. Turn the heat to medium-low, letting it warm up for a few minutes before adding the eggs. “This makes sure the heat is evenly distributed not only throughout the pan, but when cooking your eggs,” Salazar says.As for the fat? You might be wondering why you need any if you’re using a nonstick pan, but a pat of butter or a drizzle of olive oil will act as extra insurance to keep your eggs sliding around the pan’s surface, Salazar notes. You don’t need much—think 1 teaspoon per egg. The extra fat will give your eggs a creamier flavor and a richer texture, too.4. Cook low and slow.All of our pros agreed: Trying to scramble in a minute or two with the heat cranked up is the number-one way to mess up eggs, and it’s an incredibly common mistake. “High heat gives you firmer, more rubbery eggs and can cause the eggs to caramelize or brown,” Templeton says.So pour in your whisked eggs and keep that heat at medium-low. “If you hear a sizzle, your pan is too hot,” Trujillo says. That’s your cue to turn down the heat a notch, even if it seems like it’ll take years before you’ll be able to eat breakfast. (Don’t worry, it won’t: Even with your heat at medium-low, a pan of two to four scrambled eggs should cook in a few minutes, Bearss says.)5. Stir, but not too much.Let the eggs sit undisturbed for a minute or two after pouring them into the pan. That’ll help them start to set up texturally and form those big, fluffy curds, Trujillo explains.Once the edges of the eggs have set, use your spatula to lightly move, pull, and fold the eggs around the pan. “Let them set up a bit more and repeat this one more time,” she says. “Excessively stirring your eggs results in a smaller, crumbly-looking scramble.” If you notice any bits of egg sticking to the bottom or sides of the pan when you stir, use the spatula to gently lift those up too, so they don’t burn.6. Stop before they’re totally done.Take the pan off the heat when your eggs are about three-quarters of the way cooked, recommends Salazar. The scramble should appear just set and still a bit runny—but don’t worry, you’re not eating them yet.”Even though you’ve taken the pan off the heat, the residual heat will cause the eggs to continue to cook,” Salazar says.In another minute or so, this very low carryover heat will finish cooking the eggs while helping them maintain some moisture, so they stay creamy instead of drying out. They’re done when they look slightly firm and glistening with a solid yellow color and no runny or undercooked yolks, says Salazar.7. Finish and eat ASAP.If you want to flavor your eggs with extra add-ins (think chopped fresh herbs, grated cheese, or a sprinkle of hot sauce), now’s the time to do it. Then transfer the eggs to a plate and chow down.”You should always eat scrambled eggs immediately after cooking so they are still warm and haven’t had a chance to dry out,” Bearss says. After all, that would kinda defeat the purpose of all the work you did in the first place, right?Related:

The 12 Best Vegetarian Meal Kits to Try in 2022

The 12 Best Vegetarian Meal Kits to Try in 2022

Whether you’re low on time or tired of making the same old recipes, the best vegetarian meal kits will solve your dinnertime woes. They’ll save you time spent shopping at the grocery store and cooking and planning at home. Plus, these vegetarian meal delivery services give you the chance to try new (and delicious) plant-powered dinners that you might not have thought to make yourself. From harissa-spiced sweet potato tacos to roasted garlic and zucchini flatbreads, these veggie-driven meals from top-rated meal kit delivery services like Green Chef, Purple Carrot, and HelloFresh are anything but boring. If you’re really in a hurry, you can find prepared meals, which follow vegetarian diets (like nutrient-packed grain bowls and soups), from Daily Harvest, Splendid Spoon, and more. And many of these companies feature items that adhere to other dietary restrictions and specifications, with gluten-free, dairy-free, and vegan meals regularly appearing on their weekly menus.In other words, your options are far from limited when it comes to finding a food delivery service with high-quality vegetarian options. But to save you some time, we’ve highlighted some of the very best meal kit companies with vegetarian meal plans. Read on to find the best vegetarian meal kits you can try right now and make meal-planning a total breeze.All products featured on SELF are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

How ‘The Korean Vegan’ Connects With Her Culture Through Cooking

How ‘The Korean Vegan’ Connects With Her Culture Through Cooking

Joanne Lee Molinaro, 43, started using social media to share deeply personal stories about her family for one reason: to change the way Americans view immigrants in this country. The child of North Korean parents, Molinaro felt angry and hopeless about the increasingly hostile rhetoric towards immigrants in the U.S. over the past few years. So in 2018, she began posting stories about her family on Instagram, hoping to spark compassion in others. At the time, Molinaro already had a vegan food-based Instagram account with more than 10,000 followers. And she figured if her followers loved her food, they might be open to learning about her experiences as a Korean American. Molinaro steadily gained more fans, but her popularity exploded when she started posting videos that are equal parts story time and cooking tutorial. In one, Molinaro shares the time her grandparents nearly murdered her mom as a baby—all while making s’mores. Now Molinaro has a cookbook, three million TikTok followers, and even more appreciation for Korean food. Below, read Molinaro’s story about how becoming “The Korean Vegan” deepened her relationship with her family and her culture, as told to SELF’s associate health director Melissa Matthews.I started a relationship with my now husband, Anthony, in 2014. When Anthony decided to go vegan in 2016, I worried I wouldn’t be able to cook for him anymore, which is one way I like to show my love. I wasn’t vegan myself; in fact, I had never heard of a Korean person who was vegan at the time, and I was worried that I would have to cut out the food I grew up eating with my family if I joined him. Korean cuisine has plenty of veggie-centric food, but many dishes include seafood and ingredients like fish sauce.Ultimately, I decided to give it a try but thought, If I’m going to do this, I have to figure out a way to Koreanize vegan food. At the time, I knew how to cook one or two Korean dishes that my mom taught me, but I never spent a lot of time learning to cook Korean food myself. Now, I had to be proactive if I was going to be able to continue enjoying the traditional foods my family has always eaten while also sticking to being vegan. I started by just learning about Korean food and then thought of ways to make them vegan. I spent a lot of time in my mom’s kitchen asking her, “How do you make this? Why did you use that?” I never felt pressured to make everything taste exactly the same as the original version because I knew it wouldn’t be the same. My goal was to create something that tasted delicious and reminded me a whole heck of a lot of Korean dishes.Instagram contentThis content can also be viewed on the site it originates from.

30 Grilling Recipes for All Your Summer Barbecue Needs

30 Grilling Recipes for All Your Summer Barbecue Needs

Like beach days and sunscreen, grilling is one of those must-dos when the weather starts to get warm. And there are plenty of easy grilling recipes that will help you make the most of delicious cookout food all summer long—whether you’ve been barbecuing forever or it’s your very first time lighting up a pit.Though grilling can seem daunting at first, this outdoors, hands-on cooking method is no more complicated than your usual stovetop fare once you get comfortable with the basics. There are a couple of simple prep steps you need to take, but the actual cooking involved is just as simple as what you do in your kitchen on a daily basis—especially once you develop an intuitive feel for grilling (and confidence!) after a practice round or two.In fact, once you get the hang of it, cooking over a live fire can actually produce better, more consistent results than oven or stovetop cooking. Instead of trusting that your oven or electric range is at the right temperature or setting a timer and forgetting it, you can actually see and feel where the temperature is higher or lower on the grill when grilling and adjust accordingly. In general, bigger flames will be hotter, smaller ones cooler, and you can easily shift your food around depending on the kind of result you’re trying to achieve. Get a gorgeous char on a turkey or plant-based burger by placing it over a high flame for a couple minutes, for instance, then move it to a cooler spot for a few minutes more to allow the interior to finish cooking (or to keep it warm while your buns finish toasting).It may take a bit of trial and error to get used to the ins and outs of how to grill various foods to perfection, but once you do you’ll never want to go back to cooking inside. Because the best part of grilling—aside from the authentic flavor of food hot off the grates, of course—is the setting you do it in. Nothing beats enjoying the fresh air and beautiful weather, from sunny poolside afternoons to pleasant evening gatherings set to the sound of crickets (or city life), while you’re grilling up a summer feast.What are the steps to grilling?The basic steps of grilling involve cleaning the grill off (if necessary), getting your tools ready, preheating the grill, oiling the grates, getting your ingredients ready, and then cooking.When you break out the grill—whether it’s the first time you’re using it this season, a brand new grill, or just covered in icky stuff from the last use—you’ll need to clean it. Xochitl Bielma Bolton, owner and operator of Boston restaurant Bird & Wolf, tells SELF that you should start by unpacking your grill, removing any dust, and thoroughly washing the grates with soapy water and drying.You’ll also want to make sure you have the right materials on hand—your fuel source (gas, charcoal, or wood chips) and a couple of grilling accessories, Bolton says. As for fuel sources, charcoal and wood chips both add flavor to your food, but charcoal burns much hotter and longer than wood and therefore tends to produce more consistent results. On the other hand, gas grills are more predictable—but won’t infuse that same special, smoky taste into your food. Now onto tools: Grab a set of heat-resistant tongs for moving food around, a water spray bottle for managing heat and flare-ups, and a food thermometer to guarantee all your meat is safe to eat.After that, you’re ready to actually get cooking. First, heat the grill. Begin by starting a fire in the base of your barbecue with your chosen fuel source. If you’re using charcoal or wood chips, a large flame will form at first. As it subsides, you will need to add more fuel to build a base that stays hot enough to properly cook food. This preheating ritual can take up to 25 minutes (and sometimes longer), according to The Kitchn. So be patient and don’t be afraid to get started a little early. If you’re using a gas grill, however, you’ll only need roughly 15 minutes to ensure it’s fully preheated.Next, it’s time to prepare the grates. When everything is hot and ready to go, Bolton says that all you need to do is oil the grates of your grill, either using a wire or silicone pastry brush or a spray bottle. Placing food on an unoiled barbecue will make it more likely to get stuck and your grill much harder to clean later on.Finally, you’re ready to start cooking. The specifics here depend on the food you’re making, the recipe you’re following, and the exact results you’re after, but the gist of the method is always the same: Place your food items on the grill as instructed and tend to them as necessary. This may involve moving the food around based on the kind of heat exposure you’re looking for, for instance, as well as flipping, looking for signs of doneness, opening or closing the grill, and checking the internal temperature (for meat).After you’re done and the grill has cooled down, you’ll want to do a wipe-down to remove food remnants and residue. Regular cleaning will help prevent too much encrusted buildup. (For a deeper clean, follow the directions above or the manufacturer’s instructions.)What is the best thing to cook on the grill?Although there are so many things you can cook on a grill, not all foods are equally suited to this cooking method. In general, sturdier, larger, and more solid ingredients—like whole or halved vegetables or fruits, burgers, whole fish, and uncut pieces of meat—are preferred for grilling.That’s because these kinds of ingredients won’t slip easily through the grates the way some foods might, like chopped vegetables, delicate fish, or crumbly or semi-liquid ingredients. With many of these smaller or less cohesive ingredients—like sliced veggies, shrimp, or cubed meat—skewering is the way to go. Other times, like with a super tender fish filet or bunch of asparagus, foil packs are your answer. Grilling recipes will indicate when these methods are a good idea.What should I grill for the first time?The best grilling recipes for first-timers are the simplest ones. Think more substantial veggies and proteins that don’t require so much fine-tuning for excellent results.For beginner-friendly grilled dinner ideas, Bolton suggests starting with seasonal summer vegetables—think corn on the cob, halved zucchini, or bell peppers—and a forgiving protein, like chicken. (Salmon or burgers would also work.) That way, you can get comfortable with your home barbecue set-up and practice your hand. Over time, you’ll develop a more instinctive sense for how long various foods take on the grill or exactly what they look and smell like when they’re done just how you like them.This list below has got you covered—we’ve rounded up 30 easy grilling recipes that are perfect for beginners and experts alike. From meaty BBQ ideas to veggie-forward masterpieces, these are destined to be at your next summer barbecue.

45 Healthy Instant Pot Recipes You’ll Want to Cook Over and Over Again

45 Healthy Instant Pot Recipes You’ll Want to Cook Over and Over Again

Instant Pots have dominated the home cooking scene for years for good reason: There are just so many tasty and healthy Instant Pot recipes that you can make with the beloved gadget. This nifty appliance is capable of doing a lot, from whipping up dinner on a moment’s notice to being a key player in meal prep planning. The Instant Pot is perhaps most well known for its pressure-cooking function, which uses large amounts of pressure to cook everything from meat to vegetables more quickly than normal. (Or should we say instantly?) But this device has also got a bunch of other cool functions that make it even more of a kitchen ninja.We’ll expound on the Instant Pot’s rapid cooking capabilities in a minute, though. First, let’s talk about the other benefits of adding delectable, filling, easy, and healthy Instant Pot recipes to your repertoire. Beyond the fact that it’s a heck of a timesaver in that it cuts down on cooking time, Instant Pots can also make clean-up way faster and easier. You won’t end up with a sink full of dishes when everything is made in just the one pot. (This is the case with most but not all Instant Pot recipes.)The tool is also extremely handy on hot days when you’d rather not turn on the oven or stove, because as a small and insulated device, it’s not going to release a ton of heat into your kitchen. (And there are so many excellent summer Instant Pot recipes that will help you use it for this express purpose.)One more fantastic advantage of the Instant Pot? You might find yourself more apt to cook more of your meals and snacks at home when it’s so much faster and easier. (You may also feel inspired to make dishes that you wouldn’t ordinarily because of the reduced time commitment.) Now, let’s talk about all the healthy Instant Pot recipes at your fingertips—plus, the cases where you might want to skip the Instant Pot, and whether the Instant Pot is ideal for promoting healthful, enjoyable eating.What can you cook in an Instant Pot?Animal proteins (like beef and chicken), grains, beans and legumes, various veggies, yogurt, desserts, hard-boiled eggs, oatmeal, stews, curries, casseroles, and more can all be beautifully cooked in an Instant Pot.Many busy home chefs particularly love this little appliance because Instant Pot dinners drastically reduce the cooking time for dishes that typically have to simmer for a long time—like beef stew, pulled pork, bolognese sauce, chicken stock, and slow cooker chicken recipes. But you can also make pretty much any meal or meal prep component that you’d ordinarily cook on the stovetop.Don’t forget, though, that pressure cooking is just one of the Instant Pot’s many functions (at least six, depending on the model). The slow-cooking, sautéeing, and steaming functions are equally versatile for making delicious Instant Pot meals, while more specialized settings (like rice- and yogurt-making, and boiling eggs) will make specific cooking tasks a cinch. Because why do one thing when you can do them all?What should you not cook in an Instant Pot?Even though there’s an abundance of things that you can make with an Instant Pot, there are also a handful of ingredients that can’t handle the pressure very well—like pasta, dairy, and crispy foods.Delicate pasta can easily overcook and disintegrate; dairy products (like creamy sauces) can curdle or separate; and crispy things (like croutons and nuts) can get soggy. Often, you can avoid the issue by waiting to add certain ingredients until all the other parts have cooked. For instance, you can finish off a soup with a generous dose of cream, or use the sauté function to crisp bacon, then set it aside, and finally add it back to your dish at the end.Meanwhile, you’ll want to be careful when cooking more delicate proteins (like fish) or veggies (like asparagus) so that you don’t turn them into totally over-cooked mush. You can generally achieve that by following the recipe instructions regarding the timing and settings.Finally, some dishes are just not Instant Pot-friendly—anything that requires some serious searing (like steak) or crisping (like fried chicken) is probably best made using another method.Is cooking with an Instant Pot healthy?Cooking with an Instant Pot is not inherently any more or less healthy than other cooking methods. That said, if the ease and convenience of the Instant Pot recipes helps you make more homemade meals or dabble with cooking a wider variety of foods, then this appliance can be a boon for your diet.These 45 easy and healthy Instant Pot recipes will help you do just that—mix it up in the kitchen and churn out more homemade meals without spending oodles of time over the stove. They run the gamut from vegetarian to meaty, side dish to main course, classic to unconventional, and breakfast to dinner. You’ll also find Instant Pot recipes for beginners. Add a few to your rotation for some yummy, nutrient-rich, low-lift, and gratifying Instant Pot goodnessA note about the word healthy here: We know that healthy is a complicated concept. Not only can it mean different things to different people, but it’s a word that’s pretty loaded (and sometimes fraught), thanks to the diet industry’s influence on the way we think about food. At SELF, when we talk about food being healthy, sure, we’re talking about foods that are nutritious, filling, and satisfying. But we’re also talking about foods that help you connect with your culture, promote joy, and simply taste delicious. Some of those foods might fall into conventional ideas of what “healthy” is. And some might not. We selected these recipes with all of that in mind while also trying to appeal to a wide variety of nutritional needs and taste buds.

45 Delicious Spinach Recipes for Getting Your Greens

45 Delicious Spinach Recipes for Getting Your Greens

Spinach is one of those ingredients that a lot of people like to keep on hand for its versatility. The sheer variety of spinach recipes out there prove that the tender and nutritious leafy green is among the culinary world’s greatest green chameleons. Though perhaps most famous for appearing fresh in salads, there are almost limitless ways to put the veggie to work. From simply sautéed with garlic to stewed into a zesty shakshuka, there is almost no way to go wrong cooking spinach.Spinach is also popular because it’s super nutritious, reasonably priced, and widely available year-round. That makes it a cost-effective, reliable source of nutrients. Spinach is packed with essential vitamins and minerals—including vitamins A, C, and K and minerals like folate, iron, magnesium, and potassium, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.The one potential drawback of fresh spinach is its relatively short shelf life. How short depends on a few factors, but having to toss out spinach that you waited too long to use happens to the best of us at some point. (Seriously, who isn’t familiar with the tragedy of discovering a bag of forgotten, swampy spinach in the back of their crisper drawer?) Read on for helpful information on how long spinach lasts, how to store it so it stays good as long as possible, how to use up an overabundance of fresh spinach, and what to do with it once it’s gone slimy—plus, ideas about how to cook spinach and the best spinach recipes.How long does spinach last in the fridge?In general, you’ll have a few days to use up fresh spinach, though it depends on how fresh the spinach was when you bought it, the best-by date on the package, and the storage conditions in your fridge.When buying spinach, make sure to grab a bag or bunch that looks fresh and is being kept cool at the store, and put it in your fridge (at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below) within two hours of purchase, as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) instructs.Fresh bunches of spinach are best enjoyed within three to seven days, according to the United States Department of Agrciculture (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). The USDA recommends storing it lightly packed in a plastic or cellophane bag in the crisper section of the fridge. (Pro tip: Slip a paper towel or two into the bag to help absorb moisture and extend its freshness.) Then rinse under running water and pat dry right before using. Bags and cartons of pre-cut, pre-washed spinach should generally be consumed within three to five days for peak freshness and quality, per the FSIS.All that said, keep in mind that you don’t necessarily need to toss fresh spinach past its best-by date. While it may not be at its literal best, it should still be OK to eat for a few days more as long as it has been stored properly and still smells and looks good, according to the USDA. Bags of fresh-cut leafy greens, for instance, often have a shelf life of around 12 to 16 days from the time they’re packed at the plant or store until they expire, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Just be sure to smell and visually inspect the leaves for any signs of spoilage first—more on that below.What can I do with slimy spinach?Sadly, there’s only one thing to do with slimy spinach: Toss it. It might seem like a waste, but by the time spinach is becoming slimy it’s too late.Spinach that looks a little bit limp or wilty is OK. But an icky or off smell, taste, or texture—anything in the vicinity of slimy, mushy, or funky smelling—indicates that a food is starting to decompose and spoil, the USDA explains. That’s why you should always throw away all produce that appears rotten, per the FDA.What can I do with too much fresh spinach?If you have more fresh spinach than you know what to do with before it goes bad—or your spinach is still good but past its prime—fear not. Cooking this leafy green will immediately collapse it down into a more manageable volume, allowing you to enjoy it without it going to waste.A great place to start is with one of the awesome dishes featured in this collection of delicious and creative spinach recipes. But if you don’t have the time or ingredients on hand to make a whole meal featuring spinach, you can just steam or sauté it all on the stovetop. Then you’ll have a healthy batch of cooked greens in the fridge that you can enjoy as a side dish throughout the week.What food goes with spinach?A better question is what food doesn’t go with spinach. Unlike pungent kale or bitter arugula, spinach has a very mild flavor—a little earthy, just a tad sweet—that pairs well with most other ingredients.As you’ll find in these spinach recipes, the green is a great addition to nearly any savory meal, which makes it one of the best options for packing in extra veggies. It’s great for tossing right in the mix—taking on surrounding flavors while adding some pretty color, bulk, and nutrients to whatever you’re making. Think grain bowls, pastas, casseroles, soups, stews, sandwiches, frittatas, noodle dishes, and more—and even baked goods. Spinach also works as a quick, simple veggie side—sautéed with a little olive, garlic, and lemon perhaps—alongside a roasted chicken breast, nice steak, or seared fish filet, for instance.These 45 spinach recipes showcase the best of your options, from classics (like creamed spinach and sautéed spinach), to sweet treats (like pancakes and muffins), to fresh spinach recipes (like salads and smoothies.) If you thought the veggie was simple and ordinary, these ideas will definitely give you a fresh perspective.

5 Chia Seeds Benefits You Should Really Know About

5 Chia Seeds Benefits You Should Really Know About

In particular, chia seeds are a rich source of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), which, in supplement form, have been associated with increased protein synthesis (i.e. muscle-building) and reduced muscle breakdown with exercise, according to research published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. So it may be worth tossing some into your post-workout smoothie.5. They can help support bone health.If you’re looking for a non-dairy option to support a sturdy skeleton, chia’s a top choice. These tiny seeds are a good source of minerals like phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, and calcium. They’re especially rich in calcium, which is important for maintaining bone health. A serving of chia seeds provides about 18% of the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) for calcium, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Miller often recommends chia seeds as a source of calcium for people on a vegan diet. And since magnesium deficiency can contribute to osteoporosis, that mineral is good for your bones too. “This calcium-magnesium combo is needed for strong, healthy bones,” Bazilian says.How many chia seeds should you eat a day?A standard serving size of chia seeds is one ounce or about two tablespoons, according to the USDA. But as with all serving size recommendations, it’s really more of a guideline than a rule about how much you should or shouldn’t eat.You’re very much allowed to have multiple servings of chia seeds, as long as you keep their high-fiber content in mind. Miller recommends to “eat as much as you’re content, but not uncomfortable.” For more about what that means, keep reading.Can chia seeds have side effects?There are two potential chia seeds side effects you’ll want to watch out for. Because of their fiber content, eating too many at once might mess with your stomach, and if you try to consume them plain they can be a little tough to swallow—and even be a choking hazard.Generally speaking, rapidly upping the amount of fiber in your diet can be tough on your digestion and cause (temporary) side effects. Adding too many fiber-heavy chia to your diet at once can potentially set you up for uncomfortable symptoms like gas, bloating, or cramping—especially if you’re not used to getting that amount of roughage, per the Mayo Clinic.”If you aren’t consuming a lot of fiber, I suggest starting slowly with a couple teaspoons and then gradually increasing the amount of chia to avoid any gastrointestinal discomfort,” Panitz recommends. Drink plenty of fluids too, because fiber generally works best in your system when consumed with plenty of water, as SELF has reported. “Water, tea, and even coffee will help keep the chia and its fiber moving through your digestive tract,” Panitz says.The other potential risk with chia seeds is that eating a spoonful straight-up could be a choking hazard, Atlanta-based culinary and integrative dietitian Marisa Moore, RDN, LD, tells SELF. They can get stuck in your throat thanks to their tiny size and dry texture, Moore says. So just in case you were planning on popping a plain handful right into your mouth—which sounds kind of messy, honestly—try incorporating chia seeds into other foods or drinks instead, like smoothies, yogurt, or pudding. (They’ll taste better and fill you up more that way, too.)Who should not eat chia seeds?You should steer clear of chia seeds if you have trouble swallowing (because of the potential choking hazard) and proceed with caution if you have digestive issues, because of the fiber content.

Our Place’s Annual Sale Is Here—And Your Kitchen Wants You to Shop These Deals

Our Place’s Annual Sale Is Here—And Your Kitchen Wants You to Shop These Deals

When it comes to putting together a well-stocked kitchen, there are three very important things to keep in mind: budget, quality, and aesthetic. Our Place combines all three of those things as Instagram’s favorite kitchenware brand by offering reliable, great-looking cookware that stands the test of time. If you spend any amount of time online sifting through Instagram to inspire your own cooking refresh, you’ve probably seen the Always Pan time and time again, an Our Place staple that buyers keep coming back to time and time again. And we can’t forget the Perfect Pot, the ideal companion to the Always Pan. Both come in gorgeous matte finishes in a range of hues, and can even be seen in celebrity kitchens.With thousands of five-star reviews, Our Place’s nonstick cookware line has more than proved its worth, especially since it is ridiculously simple to clean while replacing the bulk of what you already keep in your kitchen. The same goes for much of Our Place’s range of high-end cookware. But you will be paying a premium price for this equipment, in case that much wasn’t already clear. If you’ve been waiting on the perfect time to pull the trigger and build a kitchenware collection you can be proud of, here’s your sign. Our Place’s line of specialty multi-purpose cookware is on sale now for the first time since Black Friday during the Our Place Annual Spring Super Sale. From now through May 8, you can save with deep discounts on Our Place’s best-selling kitchen tools and upgrades. Save on the Always Pan and Perfect Pot as well as platters, drinking glasses, knives, and more. Not sure where to start? Check out some of our picks that’ll enhance your kitchen in the best way possible. And remember, this is the only Our Place sale of the season, so act fast and lock in your picks now!All products featured on SELF are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

How to Make a Perfect Pot of Rice Without a Rice Cooker

How to Make a Perfect Pot of Rice Without a Rice Cooker

Like hard-boiling eggs and basic knife tricks, knowing how to cook rice is one of the fundamental building blocks of successful home cooking. After all, satisfyingly starchy meals are never far away with this essential skill in your back pocket. But how do you make sure your rice is cooked to perfection every time?Sure, you could use a handy digital rice cooker to help simplify the process. But the truth is that you definitely don’t need one to prepare this seminal grain to perfection. In fact, you probably already have all the necessary tools to make beautifully fluffy rice on your stovetop—all you really need is a lidded pot, salt, tap water, and, of course, a big bag of rice. Plus some rice-cooking know-how, of course—which we’ll get to in a minute.The fact that you don’t need any special equipment to make great rice is just one of many reasons why people love this cornerstone grain, which features in a wide variety of cuisines around the world. (You probably can’t say the same for cauliflower rice, can you?) Along with being an inexpensive, shelf-stable pantry staple, rice is also extremely versatile in the kitchen, as well as ideal for meal prep. Whether you’re preparing a batch of rice in advance for grain bowls, making a simple side, or turning it into the main event (think: stunning dishes like Persian tahdig or Spanish paella), there’s almost no way to go wrong with rice.Though knowing how to make rice is a basic skill, that doesn’t mean that every technical aspect of cooking rice properly is so simple. That’s why we’ve got expert-approved tips and answers to common questions like “how long does rice take to cook?” that will make the process easy every time, no matter what variety of rice you’re using. Expect a bit of trial and error in the beginning as you become familiar with the sights and smells of a well-cooked pot of rice. But once you have a bit of experience under your belt, you’ll be able to make a delicious, freshly cooked pot of rice with your eyes closed.What are the most common rice varieties?Jasmine, basmati, and brown rice are among the most common varieties of rice at the store, but they’re by no means the only ones. There’s also wild, black, red, sushi, and arborio rice—along with countless sub-varieties of white rice from many regions around the globe.There are three umbrella categories of rice, distinguished by the length of the grain: short-grain, medium-grain and long-grain rice. They’ve got different textures and therefore lend themselves well to different types of dishes. Shorter rice varieties, like Calrose and arborio, are used for sushi and risotto-style dishes because they produce creamy, stickier, starchier final products. Long-grain rice varieties are dry and better at fluffing and crisping, so they’re more ideal for both crunchy fried rice dishes and delicate, steamed rice recipes. And medium-grain rice is somewhere in the middle.Should you rinse rice?Although rinsing rice isn’t an absolute must, it is highly recommended. Rinsing your rice before cooking is a good idea because it washes away grime and starch that may otherwise make your rice sticky or gloopy when it should be fluffy, Maxine Yeung, R.D., trained chef and owner of The Wellness Whisk, tells SELF. It’s also fast and easy to do.How do you rinse rice?There are a couple of simple methods to quickly rinse rice in your kitchen sink. You can fill a large pot with rice and water, swirl things around to loosen up the excess gunk, and then pour out the dirty water, or you can simply run water directly over a sieve full of rice.

PHP Code Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com