Food / Cooking

The 19 Best Chef’s Knives, According to Chefs in 2023:

The 19 Best Chef’s Knives, According to Chefs in 2023:

Whether you’re a self-proclaimed cooking expert, or still learning your way around the kitchen, the best chef’s knives can completely elevate your cooking experience. Because of its versatility, it’s one of the most important kitchen tools to have on hand. From chopping, slicing, dicing, and mincing, the best chef’s knives can help you prepare your favorite recipes with greater ease and control. “There are so many different knives for all types of cutting needs, but the workhorse of any chef’s knife kit is their chef’s knife. It’s the most important knife to spend a little extra money on,” says Chef Chris Curren, an executive chef at The Graceful Ordinary in St. Charles, IL.The two types of chef’s knivesFull tang on the left, hidden tang on the right.
AmazonThere are two types of chef’s knives, a full tang and hidden tang, Geoff Feder, owner of Feder Knives, tells SELF. A full tang knife (top left) is heavier because the metal of the blade extends all the way to the handle where it’s sandwiched between two pieces of plastic (or whatever material the knife handle is made of). With a hidden tang knife (top right), the metal extends only partially (if at all) into the handle, making the knife lighter. The two types of steel on chef’s knivesThe blade is usually made from one of two different kinds of steel: Stainless steel or carbon steel. Feder explains that carbon steel performs better, but it’s delicate, so it’s more susceptible to rust and damage. On the other hand, stainless steel is easier to maintain, but the quality isn’t as high. How often do you need to sharpen your chef’s knife?You should plan to sharpen your knife about two or three times a year, either on your own or with a sharpening tool. “Getting a knife sharpened on a whetstone is essential once you have purchased a nice, new chef’s knife,” Chef Olivia McCoy, head chef at Daily Chew in Atlanta, GA tells SELF. She shares that you can easily learn how to use a whetstone (or sharpening stone) through online tutorials, or you can find someone locally that can sharpen your knives for you. Feder recommends using a two-sided water stone or having it professionally sharpened at your local hardware store. If you sharpen your knife regularly, it’ll take less time overall to keep the edge sharp. “If you wait until it’s super dull, it’s much harder to bring it back,” Feder explains, “[that’s] one of the reasons most people have dull knives.” Sharpening knives is a skill in and of itself, so in general it’s easier (especially for beginner chefs) to have it professionally sharpened. In the end, it’ll cost you less to maintain it than it would to buy a brand-new knife.Do need to hone your chef’s knife every week?You know those long metal rods that always come in the box knife sets? That’s a honing tool called a steel, says Feder. While sharpening removes steel from the knife to create a new edge, honing re-aligns the wire in the edge of the blade to keep it in working order. You should do this at least once a week, but you can do it as often as you like.When you use it, Feder says you shouldn’t just mindlessly rub it up and down along the edge of your knife—that will do more harm than good. Instead, gently apply pressure to your knife as you run the edge against the honing tool at a 20-degree angle (you can watch a demo of the technique here). Go slowly and repeat on both sides of the knife until you’ve honed the length of the blade. How to choose the best chef’s knife? When it comes to picking out the best chef’s knife, Chef Sieger Bayer, former executive chef of Etta in Los Angeles, shares that you need to keep two things in mind: price and maintenance. For example, if you’d like something that doesn’t require much upkeep, pick a chef’s knife that doesn’t need to be sharpened too often. Those who want an easier cleanup may opt for a knife that can be thrown into the dishwasher (as opposed to having to be hand washed). Though be advised that some high water pressure and detergents can dull the edge and loosen the handle. Feder recommends hand washing only and not letting it stay wet for too long, to avoid the blade rusting.

5 Dinners You Can Make With Frozen Vegetables

5 Dinners You Can Make With Frozen Vegetables

Although healthy eating is nuanced and I’m not one to recommend strict food rules or guidelines, it’s no secret that vegetables are pretty good for you. They contain tons of different vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals (bioactive compounds in plant foods) that can help reduce your risk of disease and improve your overall health. They’re also loaded with fiber, which aids digestion, supports a healthy gut microbiome (because certain fibers feed probiotic bacteria), and helps keep you regular. And when they’re prepared the right way, they can also taste pretty darn good.The thing about vegetables is that they’re perishable, so they can go bad in your fridge or on your countertop if you don’t use them up quickly enough. Plus, pretty much all raw vegetables require some amount of washing, peeling, de-stemming, or chopping before they’re ready to be cooked or eaten. None of these challenges are insurmountable—and I’m not knocking fresh vegetables—but for days and nights when all that prep work seems like too much, there’s another way.Enter: frozen vegetables. Blanched and flash-frozen at the peak of freshness, frozen veggies are just as nutritious as the fresh ones in the produce bins. (Blanching means the vegetables are quickly boiled, then plunged into cold water, a process that cooks them, but keeps them crisp.) Because they’re already washed, chopped, and cooked, they’re also way more convenient to use. And although this isn’t always the case, they’re typically cheaper—both because they cost less at the grocery store, and because you’re way less likely to throw them out because they went bad, which saves you money long term. (Frozen food can be kept indefinitely, but realistically, you’ll probably want to eat it within a couple of months since frozen food can still  lose flavor and texture quality over time. but it never actually goes bad.)Of course, frozen vegetables aren’t a perfect substitute for fresh vegetables, and they don’t work in every recipe. For instance, if you’re making a salad or a raw veggie platter, fresh vegetables are still your best bet. Luckily, there are still plenty of options where frozen vegetables won’t compromise the taste or quality of your meal. Here are five dinner recipes that make use of all kinds of frozen veg.Chelsea Kyle. Prop styling by Amy Elise Wilson for Laird and Good Company. Food styling by Pearl Jones for Ashley Klinger & Co. 1. Whole Wheat Dumpling-Topped Chicken Pot PieChicken and dumplings are a comfort food staple for a lot of folks. Although making them is a multi-step process, this recipe saves some time by using frozen vegetables—no chopping required!—and pre-cooked rotisserie chicken. It makes a fairly big batch (8 servings), so you can make it for a group, or refrigerate leftovers and reheat them for lunches and dinners in the days to come. Get the recipe.

The 13 Best Ninja Air Fryers and Toaster Ovens for Your Kitchen in 2023

The 13 Best Ninja Air Fryers and Toaster Ovens for Your Kitchen in 2023

Whether you find yourself low on time or you’re looking for a simpler way to prepare meals at home, the best Ninja air fryers can be used for a variety of purposes. When it comes to popular air fryer brands, Ninja (part of SharkNinja) is considered one of the most highly rated brands out there. Other popular brands include Instant Pot, Cosori, and Philips, to name a few. But with so many different air fryer models, it can be hard to narrow down the right one for your kitchen. We selected some of the best Ninja air fryer models, according to reviews. Whether you’re a fan of Ninja or you want to add an air fryer to your kitchen and enjoy the convenience of quick air fryer recipes, the best air fryers from Ninja will help make cooking a breeze.This handy kitchen gadget does so much more than just air-fry. Many models have bake, roast, sauté, and steam settings that can help you prepare all types of food for breakfast, lunch, dinner, or dessert. Some even come with two baskets that allow you to cook different foods at once. And if you’re experimenting with different cooking oils, air-frying also requires less oil than deep-frying (or no oil at all, depending on the recipe). I have my own air fryer, and, truth be told, it pretty much has replaced my oven.To help you choose the best Ninja air fryer, we rounded up different types of models from the highly sought-after brand. Below you’ll find popular picks of all shapes and sizes that can air-fry, roast, bake, sauté, steam, or more, and can be ordered right from retailers such as Amazon, Best Buy, and Walmart.All products featured on SELF are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

5 Expert Tips for Making Amazing Vegan Cookies

5 Expert Tips for Making Amazing Vegan Cookies

These aren’t vegan, are they? These are so good—there’s no way they’re vegan! No, thanks. I only eat real cookies. Those are just a few of the reactions I’ve gotten when presenting friends, family, or coworkers with one of my vegan cookie batches. And I totally get it. “Vegan” has become synonymous with “healthy” (diet culture, will you ever die?) and in the dessert world, “healthy” is often code for…not good. So when I say, “Would you like to try one of my vegan snickerdoodles?” it makes sense that some people hear, “Do you want to treat yourself to a disc of cinnamon-sugar-coated disappointment?”In fairness, I’ve had some bad vegan cookies. But I’ve also had some crappy traditional ones (a haunting encounter with a dry, crumbly, way-too-sweet chocolate chip comes to mind). In my experience, oftentimes vegan cookies aren’t bad because they’re vegan. Some suck because they just don’t have the right balance of ingredients, or, yes, because they’ve been overly altered. (No shame whatsoever if this is your thing—all foods are morally equal, and I have chickpea blondies in my freezer—but a cookie made with protein powder and cauliflower that’s gluten-free, sugar-free, low-fat, and vegan probably won’t hit your tastebuds the same as your grandmother’s recipe.) Baking is an art and a science, and not every combination of moisture, fat, and sweet-to-salty ratio is going to create the same mouthwatering result.In other words, vegan cookies don’t have to be bad, and you also don’t have to be vegan to make or enjoy them! Maybe you want to try consuming fewer animal products for ethical or environmental reasons, maybe you love someone who eats a plant-based diet and you want to make them something sweet to brighten their day or holiday spirit, or maybe you just think it’s really fun to experiment with baked goods (hi!).Your motivation is your business, and mine is helping you make some damn good dessert. To that end, I asked a few professional plant-based bakers for their best tips for making amazing cookies that also happen to be vegan.1. Choose a butter substitute with enough fat.Butter is responsible for crispy edges and chewy middles, so if that’s the kind of plant-based cookie you’re going for, choose a dairy-free alternative that’s equally as high in fat, Auzerais Bellamy, a Michelin-starred pastry chef and the founder of mail-order blondie bakery Blondery, tells SELF. “I look for butter alternatives that have a low water content. The more fat the better!” she says. Traditional butter has about 11 grams of fat per one-tablespoon serving, so you’ll want to choose alternatives with a similar amount. Bellamy’s favorite? Earth Balance Vegan Buttery Sticks. They have a classic buttery flavor and help create nice and crisp cookie edges, she says. Another 1:1 substitute for dairy butter that tastes and performs like the real deal, according to me and a bunch of plant-based baking bloggers, is Miyoko’s European Style Cultured Vegan Butter. (I also highly recommend it for ultraflaky plant-based pie crusts!)2. Use coconut cream or milk in place of heavy cream or condensed milk.Again, this is all about the fat. It’s reasonable to assume that nondairy milk would make a suitable substitute for the heavy cream in, say, fudgy double-chocolate cookies, or for the sweetened condensed milk in magic cookies bars, but a lot of milk alternatives at the grocery store (almond, soy, etc.) are mostly water, so they can’t create the same rich results. But coconut cream or full-fat coconut milk can! “Fat adds flavor and texture no matter where it’s coming from—plants or animals,” as Bellamy puts it. Just make sure you mix your coconut milk or cream really well before using it, since the fat separates from the liquid in the can. 3. Don’t count soy milk out, though.If you’re looking to replace regular ol’ milk in a cookie recipe, soy milk might be your best bet. “After recipe testing with just about every plant-based milk out there, I’ve found that unsweetened plain soy milk is the most reliable for cookies, and also cakes and muffins,” Toni Okamoto, founder of popular food blog Plant-Based on a Budget and author of the upcoming cookbook Plant-Based on a Budget Quick & Easy, tells SELF. “Its high protein content allows for great structure (so your cookie doesn’t fall apart!) and a chewy texture. It also has a neutral taste that doesn’t overpower baked goods.”4. When it comes to “flax eggs,” use a tiny bit less water.If you’re new to the plant-based baking world’s beloved “flax egg,” it might sound like a strange (gross, even) swap, but I can attest that a mixture made of flaxmeal (ground flaxseed) and water is, indeed, a reliable replacement for a chicken egg in most cookie recipes. If you google how to make one, you’ll most often see a ratio of three tablespoons of water for every tablespoon of flaxmeal. (You just stir the flax and water together and let it sit for about 10 to 15 minutes to thicken to an egg-like consistency.) However, Okamoto says—and I agree—that by cutting the water down to two and a half tablespoons for every tablespoon of ground flaxseed, you get a thicker, goopier result. “It gels better than using three tablespoons of water, so it does a better job of binding the rest of the ingredients together,” she says. 

How Do I Stop My Smoke Alarms From Going Off When I’m Cooking?

How Do I Stop My Smoke Alarms From Going Off When I’m Cooking?

I can’t say I gave ventilation much thought in the first three decades of my life, but the pandemic changed that. Once it became known that COVID-19 is airborne—and that open windows, a fan, and/or an air purifier could meaningfully lower the risk of getting or spreading the virus—I was all in. Along with masking and rapid testing, air purifiers can serve as an extra layer in the “Swiss cheese” model of risk prevention. But one thing I didn’t expect is how useful an air purifier would be in scenarios that have nothing to do with COVID. For starters, I love to crank it on when I’m cleaning the bathroom; I’m really sensitive to smells, and I’ve found that running the purifier really cuts back on how much the harsh chemicals bother me. Speaking of chores, I also find it’s helpful when I’m dusting or kicking up a lot of dog hair. But one of my favorite ways to use an air purifier is running it while cooking, especially when working with recipes that are likely to set off the smoke detector. We’ve all been there: Maybe you’re cooking with very hot oil that’s popping and splattering a bit, or you’re broiling something that gets a little too charred on the edge, or you simply turn away from whatever is in your cast iron pan for a minute too long. The next thing you know, your smoke alarm is screaming at you, and now you’re not only trying to keep your dinner from burning up—but you’re also trying desperately to fan the air around the detector to make the noise stop. The worst is when you get it to finally, mercifully STFU…only to have it start up again five minutes later. Lest you accuse me of being a terrible cook, I feel compelled to point out that something doesn’t actually have to be burning for this to happen. Smoke detectors that rely on ionization can be especially prone to false alarms, something that is a fairly frequent occurrence in my apartment. These “nuisance alarms” are actually a safety problem—because they can eventually lead people to disable their smoke detectors entirely, which is not good—but in my case, the issue is more that they are really goddamn loud and stressful. Like, Stop *yelling* at me!! This isn’t helping!!!!! I understand that communicating urgency is literally the alarm’s whole job, but does it have to make me feel so judged in the process? I’m not sure exactly how or when I figured out that an air purifier might be effective in preventing nuisance alarms when cooking, but since coming to the realization—and then putting it to the test by making the meals we know always lead to our ceiling unit screaming—I haven’t looked back. My girlfriend and I turn ours on pretty regularly for weeknight cooking, but on big kitchen days like Thanksgiving and Christmas? When our go-to beef tenderloin recipe literally always leads to multiple smoke alarm moments? You can bet that thing is going to be whirring away all day, gobbling up all the bad air and ensuring that the only sounds we’re hearing are the dulcet tones of the Thanksgiving Day parade commentary and our favorite cooking playlist. Again, there are many reasons to embrace an air purifier with a HEPA filter—they can reduce the level of allergens, pet dander, dust, and airborne COVID-infected particles from your space. But if you’d simply like to prepare a nice meal without being harassed every five minutes by an oversensitive smoke detector, consider turning on your air purifier and enjoying the peace and quiet of your well-ventilated space. AmazonCoway Airmega HEPA Air PurifierRelated:

The 17 Best Quiche Recipes You’ll Want to Eat From Breakfast to Dinner

The 17 Best Quiche Recipes You’ll Want to Eat From Breakfast to Dinner

Although French food has a reputation for being complicated, the best quiche recipes are actually pretty simple and convenient. Made from a base of eggs and pie dough, quiches are infinitely adaptable and ideal for every moment of the day, from breakfast to brunch to lunch to dinner (and even snack time!). As long as you understand a few basic quiche-making principles—like which veggies should and shouldn’t be included, and the best ratio of eggs and milk or cream for an ideal texture—a flaky, protein-rich baked quiche is definitely within reach.Along with being easy to make and so versatile, quiche recipes are also meal prep superheroes. Just one full quiche is enough to feed several people for days, and they freeze and reheat especially well, so you can always pack up what you won’t be able to eat right away for way later down the line.To learn the basics, start by making the classics. Quiche Lorraine, for example, is perhaps the most iconic version of this dish—and you only need four ingredients (bacon, eggs, cream, and onion) to make this classic quiche. Traditional versions of the recipe may require you to make your own pie dough from scratch, but you can minimize your workload and get equally delicious results by using your favorite pre-made fresh or frozen pie crust option instead. From there, all you have to do is sauté a bit of bacon and onions, stir them into your egg mixture, pour everything in a pie pan, pop it in the oven, and kick your feet up while the whole thing cooks to perfection.Once you’ve made a quiche like this, the sky’s the limit. Use the tips below to understand all the dos and don’ts of how to make quiche, as well as exactly how it’s different from other baked, egg dishes—and the secret to getting it right every time.What’s the difference between quiche, custard, and frittata?Although all three of these dishes use eggs as a binder, each one has a couple key differences, Gill Boyd, culinary arts chef-instructor at the Institute of Culinary Education, tells SELF. He explains that custards are usually much sweeter than quiche, typically served for dessert—think flan or vanilla pudding—and can be made with or without a crust depending on your purposes.By contrast, frittatas and quiche have a lot more in common. Both are savory (often including cheeses, whether we’re talking cheddar, Swiss, or any other tasty kind) and cooked in the oven, but the former rarely features a crust or dough of any kind.What’s the best type of crust for quiche?Boyd explains that the best crust for quiche also happens to be the most simple option—a savory pastry dough made from just flour, butter, salt, and water. “[This] dough keeps its shape while baking, has some flakiness to it, and holds a buffer from the cream-egg mixture,” he says. “If baked right, it does not get soggy.”Although this option provides the most reliable results, according to Boyd, it’s definitely not the only one that will work. Puff pastry (like you would use for an easy pie crust) also makes an ideal base for quiche, though you may need to parbake it for 10 or 15 minutes before adding the filling to prevent any soggy bottoms. Alternatively, plenty of recipes provide excellent non-traditional alternatives that taste great and get the job done, including gluten and dairy-free options, and even crusts made from totally unexpected ingredients like thinly sliced sweet potato.What are the best vegetables to put in a quiche?For egg quiche filling, “you can use any type of vegetables, but those that have less moisture are better because excess moisture will work against the final texture you want,” Boyd explains. For example, vegetables that have a naturally high water content, like tomatoes or mushrooms, may prevent your quiche from firming up properly if added raw. When in doubt, he suggests cooking vegetables in a skillet before combining them with your egg mixture to remove as much moisture as possible.How long do I need to cook quiche?In general, Boyd says that a quiche baked in a 9-inch pie pan will need no more than 30 to 40 minutes in an oven heated to 375 degrees, but it may need a bit more time if you didn’t pre-cook your vegetables. You’ll know it’s ready when it’s firm on the edges and jiggles slightly in the center when moved. If you notice that the quiche is beginning to brown or burn before it’s ready, cover it with a sheet of aluminum foil and continue baking until it’s finished.What’s the secret to a great quiche?At the end of the day, it’s all about texture: The secret to making a great quiche depends on the ratio of eggs and milk or heavy cream used to make your base, says Boyd. Too much milk or cream will result in a quiche that never fully firms up, and too many eggs will produce an overly firm quiche. In general, stick with 1 ½ cup of milk or cream per every three large eggs, and you’ll be good to go.Put your new knowledge to work with some help from these 17 easy quiche recipes. From classic options like broccoli cheddar and spinach quiche recipes, to options made with plant-based and gluten-free alternatives, it won’t be hard to find your next breakfast, lunch, or dinner in this list.

The Best Ways to Stir Natural Peanut Butter and Almond Butter

The Best Ways to Stir Natural Peanut Butter and Almond Butter

That’s it! You’re very welcome and please don’t @ me if you didn’t hold onto the jar tightly enough. I truly am sorry, but you’ve been warned.How to make stirring nut butter less annoying without an electric mixerMaybe you don’t have one, maybe you don’t believe in them, or maybe you don’t feel like cleaning the nooks and crannies of the beater afterward. I get it! In that case, the next few tips are for you.Store the jar upside down.If you’re a nut butter (and tahini) head like me, you may have heard this tip already, but it really does help. When you bring your beloved jar home from the store, turn it upside down before stashing it in your cabinet or pantry; this allows the oil at the top to slowly spread throughout the jar, making it easier to stir the nut butter when it’s time to dig in. And don’t store it right-side up after you’ve mixed it, either—flipping the jar on its lid also prevents the oil from re-separating.Another pro tip (me–I’m the pro): Stir the nut butter first (ideally with the electric mixer hack above) and then store it upside down. In my experience, the upside-down trick doesn’t usually work so well with a particularly separated jar; by mixing everything up first, you’ll make your life easier in the long run.If it’s really separated, stir it in a mixing bowl.The main reason it’s so frustrating to stir separated nut butter is because the jar is too damn small, and that’s especially true if you have a lot of oil at the top and extra-dry nut butter at the bottom. An easy solution to that problem: Dump your separated spread into a medium-sized mixing bowl so you have plenty of room to combine everything. Then simply return it to the jar, using a silicone spatula (if you have one) so it’s easier to get every last precious drop back into the jar.Use a knife.While the above strategies are the best I’ve discovered for making stirring nut butter less of a chore, if you’re going to do it the old-fashioned way for whatever reason, don’t use a spoon—a knife leads to less splattering, and less splattering leads to less cursing.Related:

Here’s How to Thaw Frozen Chicken Safely

Here’s How to Thaw Frozen Chicken Safely

Abbey Sharp, RD, blogger and author of the Mindful Glow Cookbook, tells SELF that she prefers this method because it “requires the least amount of fussing and attention” and “helps maintain the texture and integrity without the chicken meat getting waterlogged.”The USDA and Dr. Tierno also agree that this method is safest says because it eliminates the risk of your chicken entering the Danger Zone. That also means it’s the slowest, though, so you’ve got to think ahead a little. While the exact length of time required depends on things like the temperature your fridge is set to, where in the fridge you put the chicken, and the size of the chicken breasts, you can generally expect to budget at least one day if not two, according to the USDA. (So if you want to make chicken for dinner on Tuesday night, for instance, you’ll want to transfer it from the freezer to the fridge on Sunday night or Monday.)You do have some leeway with the timing, though. Once thawed, the chicken will stay good in the fridge for a day or two before cooking, per the USDA. And if dinner plans change in that time period, it’s totally safe to put the chicken back in the freezer without cooking it. (More on that in a bit.)How can you thaw frozen chicken fast?If you’re wondering how to thaw chicken fast, though, that’s a slightly different story. Obviously, planning a day ahead isn’t always feasible. If you find yourself in a poultry pinch, consider treating your chicken like an Olympic athlete and embrace the cold water soak. Fair warning, though: The cold water method requires “a lot of babysitting,” which is why Sharp says she only uses it sparingly.Here’s what you do, as the USDA lays it out: First, either leave the chicken in the airtight packaging it came in, or put it in a leak-proof plastic bag. This prevents bacteria from the surrounding air or water from getting into the meat. (And yes, that also means you shouldn’t be washing chicken either.) Then, submerge it in cold tap water, which you need to change out every 30 minutes or so as the chicken thaws and the water warms up. Set a timer on your phone if you know you’re likely to forget what you were doing.How long the whole water bath thing takes depends on the water temperature and the amount of chicken. A pound of chicken breast might take just an hour or less, while a three or four pound whole chicken will take two or three hours, the USDA says. Cook it right away once it’s thawed. Can you defrost chicken in the microwave?People often look to the microwave when wondering how to defrost chicken the quickest way possible. But the microwave method barely makes the cut, because although it is speedy, it can also be risky if not done right.

How to Make Homemade Pancakes That Are Fluffy and Delicious

How to Make Homemade Pancakes That Are Fluffy and Delicious

Flipping is an essential (if not the most important) step in every pancake recipe, so you want to make sure you have the right vehicle to make this as seamless as possible. Flipping in a small or curved pan can prove difficult, which is why Neil Kleinberg, chef and owner of beloved NYC pancake spot Clinton St. Baking Co., swears by a flat, non-stick griddle for the job instead.But if you don’t have a griddle and don’t feel like investing in one to satisfy your pancake cravings, you don’t have to. Feel free to use a large skillet or pan with a surface area big enough to flip your pancakes on. A nonstick surface will help ensure a smooth flip, though you’ll still want to grease your pan either way. When it comes to which oil is best for cooking pancakes, butter or plant-based butter alternatives win by a longshot. “I prefer it because it adds a better flavor and more browning to my pancakes,” Jenny McCoy, pastry chef at Buck Russell’s Bakery & Sandwich Shop in Chicago, tells SELF. “ I usually melt a small bowl and brush it lightly on my pan with a pastry brush so I can control how much I’m using because you really only need a very thin layer,” she explains. Audrey Bruno / Thomas BringoldCopyright 2019. All rights reserved.2. Find the perfect ratio for your DIY pancake batter recipe.Kleinberg says the best pancake recipes generally follow a ratio of 1 cup of wet ingredients to 1 cup of dry ingredients. What you choose for them, though, can vary.Wet ingredients can include things like eggs, dairy products like milk, cream, melted butter, or yogurt, and nondairy alternatives like oat milk, almond milk, or soymilk, Kleinberg says. Dry ingredients include flour, salt, baking powder, and any spices you want to include. And you should always use 2 teaspoons of baking powder for every cup of flour to ensure your pancakes rise properly. (Pro tip: Make homemade pancake mix from the recipe below ahead of time and store in an airtight container until you’re ready to use. Because none of the ingredients included perish quickly, you’ll be able to use it for months.)  

Everything You Need to Know About Hearts of Palm Noodles

Everything You Need to Know About Hearts of Palm Noodles

Once upon a time, zoodles were all the rage in the world of pasta alternatives. These days, there’s a new kid on the block: hearts of palm noodles. These pasta-like, plant-based strands are making waves in the world of grain-free veggie noodles. If they’ve popped up on your radar recently—perhaps you’ve seen them on the shelves at the grocery store or getting a shout-out on your favorite food blogger’s Instagram feed—you may be wondering what the deal is, and if they’re worth all the fuss.There are a lot of reasons that heart of palm pasta is rising in popularity—as we’ll explore—from its pleasant taste and al dente texture, to how easy it is to make, to its impressive fiber content.Plus, these unusual noodles cater well to lots of different dietary needs and preferences. “Hearts of palms can be enjoyed on various eating patterns, from plant-based to low-carb,” Rhyan Geiger, RDN, owner of Phoenix Vegan Dietitian, tells SELF. They’re good for people who eat a vegan diet and individuals who have celiac disease (as well as a wheat allergy or non-celiac gluten sensitivity) and want some more good gluten-free pastas in their life.This unique ingredient is also as well adapted to different flavor profiles as it is to different kinds of eating. These babies are versatile, especially compared to some of their predecessors, like zucchini or sweet potato noodles. (The former can easily become mushy if cooked too long, and the latter can’t be eaten raw, while hearts of palm noodles can.) From low-carb dinners with plenty of heft to refreshing, crunchy salads for all your summer barbecues, there’s almost no way you can’t cook with this ingredient.Are you convinced to give hearts of palm pasta a try yet? Read on for everything you need to know about these trendy, tasty noodles.What are hearts of palm pasta made from?Hearts of palm noodles are typically made from just one main ingredient: Hearts of palm, the core (or “heart”) of certain palm tree varieties.This vegetable is derived from the inner part of particular palm tree varieties that are native to South and Central America, according to the Michelin Guide. It’s long and cylindrical, and often sold canned or jarred and sometimes sliced into rings. More recently, it’s been more broadly available in pre-cut noodle form, from linguini to angel hair to lasagna noodles.In many cases, hearts of palm will be the only ingredient, but sometimes there are small amounts of other ingredients too. “Depending on the brand, hearts of palm noodles may have salt added, as well as water,” Geiger explains. Some brands add citric acid as a preservative, too.If you’re trying to cut down on sodium—say, if you have high blood pressure, for instance, and your doctor recommended limiting it as part of a heart-healthy diet—Geiger recommends seeking out select brands that make their noodles with only hearts of palm (like Trader Joe’s). Alternatively, you can rinse the noodles to remove as much salt as possible before cooking to ensure that neither the flavor nor sodium levels of your final dish are affected, Rachel Naar, RD, CDN, owner of Rachel Naar Nutrition LLC, tells SELF.Is hearts of palm pasta the same as Palmini?Yes. Palmini is one of the better known brands of hearts of palm pasta and helped popularize the product early on. So much so that people sometimes say “Palmini noodles” to refer to generic hearts of palm pasta.What do hearts of palm noodles taste like?Hearts of palm noodles have a mostly neutral flavor with citrusy notes that are similar to that of an artichoke heart, Olivia Roszkowski, a health-supportive culinary arts chef-instructor at the Institute of Culinary Education, tells SELF.

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