Fine Jewelry

How Celebrity-Loved Lebanese High Jeweler Selim Mouzannar’s Pieces Marry Beirut, Paris, and Family Heritage

How Celebrity-Loved Lebanese High Jeweler Selim Mouzannar’s Pieces Marry Beirut, Paris, and Family Heritage

Emma Stone in Selim Mouzannar jewelry
In the heart of Beirut’s Achrafieh district lies one of the city’s crown jewels: the workshop of jeweler Selim Mouzannar. Walking through these old and winding, leafy streets, birdsong is conspicuously absent as the feathered friends hide from the cold. Beirut is an ongoing source of inspira­tion for Mouzannar and his office is a world away from the neighborhood’s French colonial architecture, and light years away from the chaos that is Beirut. Not a paper is out of place; the workshop is crisp and clean.
Selim Mouzannar
Soft edges caress white surfaces, and everything is contemporary. Ar­tisans buzz around in white coats like bees laden with nectar. In the midst of it all stands Selim Mouzannar. Effortlessly chic wearing round glasses, he surveys his personal crea­ ve kingdom and smiles. Hailing from a dynasty  of jewelers who supplied the Ottoman courts, Mouzannar has jewelry in his blood. Due to poli­tical turmoil and upheavals, his family left Syria in 1860 and settled in Beirut, immersing themselves in Lebanese life. Mouzannar flirted with the idea of becoming a journalist, but family tradition and a sense of responsibility steered him toward goldsmithing, and he embraced his heritage. In 1981, Mouzannar went abroad to study gemology and mineralogy in Paris and Antwerp. An internship in New York followed before he ended up in Saudi Arabia working for Robert Mouawad, the scion of another Beirut jewelry family. Later, he would work hard to educate himself in business and communica­ on, all the while aveling the world, from France to the US, Thailand to Myanmar, soaking up inspira­tion as he went and spending ­ time at the ruby mines of Païlin in Cambodia.
Fish for Love necklace in pink gold andgreen enamel, set with diamonds
“I’ve seen open mining in Thailand, on the ground; I’ve experienced the bohemian side of the business,” reflects Mouzannar. “It’s nothing special being a jeweler in the family. It’s not an honorable thing, it’s actually the easiest path to take.” His father was a modest jeweler working out of Beirut’s old souks, but upon his return to Beirut in 1993, the younger Mouzannar stuck out on his own. “There was a conflict of ideas [with my father]. Nothing major, but I decided to start alone,” he shares. His flagship store opened in 2006, the year Israel and Lebanon went to war. Seeing that his prospects within the coun y were limited, and not just because of the war – “There was no room to grow,” he recalls – he chose to look further afield. “I decided to enroll in major exhibitions abroad and found out how much the international market was interested in my designs, in Paris, London, and the UAE. In particular, an exhibition under the foundation of Sheikha Shamsa bint Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum – the impact was amazing,” he says, a little wide-eyed. Today, his work is sold at Harrods, Net-A-Porter, Bergdorf Goodman, and Le Bon Marché, and is worn by Jennifer Lawrence, Michelle Pfeiffer, Emma Stone, and more.
Istanbul pendant
Mouzannar’s clientele share his values: they first seek something they are comfortable with. “Something that gives them joy through the colors I use and, like everyone, we all want to own a timeless object. I always try to find this sort of client,” notes the jeweler. The key to his success is his artisans, and his ongoing love of learning and self-improvement. “I go back to the artisans. I don’t believe a designer can be a real designer without knowing the minimum of the business. The progress, how the piece starts and finishes… You can’t design something without understanding the process. This is why I am always in the workshop,” he says.
Gala Gonzalez in Selim Mouzannar jewelry
It’s this dedication to craft that sets Mouzannar apart. His pieces are easy to spot: there’s a distinct, unapologetic style. “The world of gems is huge, it’s part of the earth, and part of nature. You must have your own DNA. It’s so easy to get into the trend, but you will be like a sheep, just another manufacturer, like many on the market,” he states. Mouzannar’s business is niche enough to bestow a degree of rarity to each design. ” There are thousands of jewelers out there, but precious few have such a personal s˜ le as his. Mouzannar’s latest collection is called Aïda. Replete with transparent mineral enamel, the pieces are a kaleidoscope of greens, blues, and oranges. It’s a poetic name, bringing to mind the opera and Egypt in its heyday. “By coincidence, my mother’s name is Aïda,” smiles the jeweler. Alongside it is Rose de France, a collection featuring special hexagonal step cuts mounted in a contemporary style with gold, paying tribute to the Republic. “If you see the map of France, it looks like a hexagon,” he explains.
Rachel Brosnahan in Selim Mouzannar jewelry
To date, Mouzannar has launched 15 collections. Each is unique as he doesn’t conform to a set approach, giving free reign to his creativity. “I do what I love, over more than 40 years of working. I was 21 when I started in Saudi. I learned so much, more in a day than you learn here in years, and that experience carries from one place to another,” he offers. In the same way that a gemstone is polished, Paris polished Mouzannar, professionally and personally. “For me, both Paris and Beirut are the most important cities. I believe in universalism, I love many cultures, which I learned to appreciate ¡ om Asia to Europe to the Arab world,” he says. It’s this appreciation for culture, for universal style that informs every Selim Mouzannar piece – unique and universal, it speaks to a creator steeped in culture and always striving for excellence.
Read Next: The 12 Most Interesting Jewelry Trends Spotted on the Runway This Season
Originally published in the May 2022 issue of Vogue Arabia

The Most Beautiful Jewelry Spotted on Celebrities at the 2022 Cannes Film Festival

The Most Beautiful Jewelry Spotted on Celebrities at the 2022 Cannes Film Festival

Photo: Instagram.com
Cannes Film Festival may be a celebration of the best cinema across the globe, but on the red carpet, the annual event is all about sartorial statement makers. Flying in from countries far and wide, celebrities have been seen sauntering down the red carpet year after year in extravagant couture pieces—and sparkling jewels to match.
The 75th edition of the Cannes Film Festival kicked off on May 17, and has already had stars serving up some stunning looks, each complemented with the perfect baubles. To kick things off, American actor Viola Davis made an appearance wearing a bejeweled Bird of Paradise in her hair, and not too long after, Julianne Moore stepped out in a classic black gown amped up with a diamond and emerald Bulgari neckpiece.

Not-so-basic earpieces are already proving to be a favorite this year, with Toni Garn pairing her backless white gown with delicate winding creations by Messika, and Matilda Anna Ingrid Lutz opting for dangling diamond ear cuffs.

Chopard, the Swiss jeweler that has designed a special Palme d’or trophy for the 75th edition of Cannes, also had its big red carpet moment with Eva Longoria donning a classic black diamond-studded choker by the French Riviera, while Piaget stole the spotlight with Katherine Langford, who styled her shimmering gown with an elegant neckpiece worn backward. And then there was Elvira Jain, who made a case for rubies in a Bour by Jahan choker set, which she wore with a semi-sheer black Atelier Zuhra ensemble.
To see all the best jewelry moments from the 2022 Cannes Film Festival, start scrolling.
Elvira Jain in Bour By Jahan
Jasmine Tookes in Messika. Photo: Courtesy Messika
Joséphine Striver in Messika. Photo: Courtesy Messika
Katherine Langford in Piaget. Photo: Instagram.com
Matilda Anna Ingrid Lutz in Chanel Joaillerie. Photo: Courtesy Chanel
Deepika Padukone in Sabyasachi Jewelry. Photo: Instagram.com/deepikapadukone

Cartier Unveils Exhibition at Dallas Museum of Art

Cartier Unveils Exhibition at Dallas Museum of Art

DALLAS — The Dallas Museum of Art takes visitors through the creative process of jewelers inspired by Eastern art in its spectacular new show, “Cartier and Islamic Art: In Search of Modernity.”The exhibition is somewhat different from a show by the same name that opened in October at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris and reportedly attracted more than 100,000 visitors.
DMA director Augustín Arteaga said the idea for the Dallas show was born at a 2018 meeting where he discussed the idea with Cartier heritage, image and style director Pierre Rainero and DMA decorative arts and design curator Sarah Schleuning.
At a press conference, Arteaga said he had long been an admirer of Cartier jewelry as a form of artistic expression and had curated an exhibition for the house at the Palacios de Bellas Artes in Mexico City in 1999.

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Cartier exhibitions, which draw heavily on jewelry, documents and other items from its own archive, are always curated by third-party professionals, Rainero noted.
The Dallas show was also inspired by the Keir Collection of Islamic Art, an esteemed assemblage of nearly 2,000 works that has been on long-term loan to the DMA since 2014.
“Since I joined the DMA in 2016, one of my goals has been to connect our museum with our diverse constituency and to provide our visitors the opportunity to see themselves represented here and learn about world cultures,” Artega said.
The dimly lit exhibit is as dazzling as it is dense, spotlighting more than 130 pieces of glittering Cartier jewelry, handbags, cigarette cases, compacts and other items that largely date to the first half of the 20th century.
The lavish baubles are explicated by artwork and decorative objects from the Middle East, India, North Africa and Asia that resemble their shape and form, including paintings, pottery, manuscripts, architectural illustrations and textiles.
Louis J. Cartier, grandson of house founder Jacques Cartier, became an admirer and collector of Islamic artworks after expositions in Paris in 1903 and 1912 and Munich in 1910 that introduced the genre to a European audience.
In addition, his brother Jacques traveled to India and Bahrain and brought inspirational objects back home.
“The discovery of Islamic art was so new,” Rainero said in an interview. “It was an enchantment of new shapes that were very decorative and very different from what was in the environment.”
Cartier had his designers spend hours studying and drawing the interlocking and interlacing forms, he noted.
“He asked the designers to go into the essence of new shapes, not only for the sake of their intrinsic beauty, but also for the possibility to build on those shapes and create something distinctive and appropriate for the new century,” Rainero explained.
The patterns and forms that Cartier began exploring in the early 20th century influenced the Art Deco style that matured in the 1920s and 1930s.
Because jewelry is small, lead exhibition designer Liz Diller of Diller Scofidio + Renfro in New York deployed 10 super-high-resolution digital videos to magnify about 20 pieces to wall size, revealing structure and patterns that might otherwise be missed.

Each of the four galleries features a projection that animates the concept and construction of a Cartier “hero object” that is displayed alone with the video.
The analysis of a 1922 gold, coral and diamond bandeau tiara, for instance, begins with an architectural drawing of similar shape and animates the creation of the gold frame and stones dropping into their settings.
“People stop and look at the hero object and back at the video, and it helps them see the intricacy, the construction, the patterns that are super complex,” Diller said. “It took us a while to figure out how these things were constructed.”
Another unusual presentation is the “breathing necklace,” a lacy 1948 gold and diamond bib clasped around a mock neck and shoulders that moves slowly up and down, lifting the necklace from flat to contoured and back again.
It has been over seven years since the last North American Cartier exhibition at the Denver Art Museum, noted Mercedes Abramo, president and chief executive officer of Cartier North America.
“It’s wonderful to have an exhibition of this size and scale for Cartier,” Abramo said. “It’s about getting people excited about Cartier, both our existing clients and new clients.”
She declined to say how the four-month show in Paris may have affected sales, store or web traffic.
Cartier feted museum supporters and presenting sponsor PNC Bank on Tuesday evening and flew in about 150 to 200 important clients and about 20 members of the press for dinner at the museum on Wednesday and subsequent previews of the show, which runs until Sept. 18.
Schleuning curated the exhibition with DMA curator of Islamic and medieval art Heather Ecker, Musée des Arts Décoratifs chief curator of ancient and modern jewelry Évelyn Possémé and Musée du Louvre curator and deputy director of Islamic art Judith Hénon.
“What I hope people walk away with,” Schleuning said, “is this incredible idea of what it means to be inspired, to look at things from the past…and how they inspire new ideas.”

Marissa Collections Sees Growth in Palm Beach, Driven by Jewelry

Marissa Collections Sees Growth in Palm Beach, Driven by Jewelry

Marissa Collections’ gamble on Palm Beach has paid off. The Naples, Fla.-born luxury retailer signed a lease for its approximately 3,300-square-foot space at Palm Beach’s Royal Poinciana Plaza in February 2021 and quietly opened with a small soirée in December. There were hoops galore to jump through — a saturated market as brands and multibrand boutiques followed the herd to Florida, the island’s strict preservation codes and COVID-19 construction woes. But they had an ace in hand: their Gem Award-winning fine jewelry gallery.“The catalyst for us coming to Palm Beach was when Neiman Marcus pulled out, and it opened up a handful of our jewelry designers there. New York stores were also closed,” said chief executive officer Jay Hartington, son of founders Marissa and Burt Hartington. “We’d talked about a second store for years and first considered a pop-up but then decided to go all in.”

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The interior of the Marissa Collections store in Palm Beach.

The store added the category 12 years ago and launched its jewelry gallery in 2013. Jay Hartington said jewelry sales organically grew from nearly nothing to 60 percent of the total business, which shot up 44 percent in 2021 and only dipped 3 percent in 2020. Clients may have skipped cocktail and runway attire during the pandemic, but a shiny new accessory was a different story.
“If you’re a shopper, you’re a shopper,” he said, of clients having money to spend. “Say you’re a family that normally takes a big trip to Europe or Stein Eriksen Lodge, but now you’re just staying in Florida or coming to Florida. Our jewelry sales went through the roof.”
The Palm Beach store’s merchandising makes it difficult to escape jewelry. Sylva & Cie and Mattia Cielo were formerly at Neiman’s, while Irene Neuwirth and Sidney Garber didn’t have Palm Beach representation. Some designers, like Melissa Kaye and Anita Ko, are also carried at the Naples location, but Marla Aaron and Brent Neale are exclusive to Palm Beach. The store stocks new David Webb pieces (his vintage designs can be found elsewhere on the island). The store hosts trunk shows on a weekly basis.
“People who are buying over-the-top jewelry 100 percent want to meet the designer. It’s like the art world,” Hartington said.
A piercing studio partnership with Venice, Calif.-based Stephanie Anders’ Royal Heritage Tattoo also drives traffic. Hartington said besides shaking up the Stubbs & Wootten set — Victoria Beckham recently stopped by for a service — the only local piercing options were Claire’s or tattoo parlors. The store also offers in-house alternations, a key amenity for eveningwear that isn’t common here. Hartington said they’ll add more event-driven attire, the store’s specialty clothing-wise, as well as the bags and shoes to tie it all together.
“We’re outpacing our forecasting. Clothing is killing it, too, and we need more of everything,” he said.
For her part, Marissa sought out clothing lines that didn’t have local representation. Australia has been a fresh source for what Hartington describes as “the new Ulla Johnsons.” She thrives on the challenge of cracking the market’s code of dress.
“You could drop her in Telluride, and she’ll figure it out,” he said, unfazed by the proximity of Kirna Zabête, the Webster and Fivestory New York. “They’re very good at what they do, but we’re a Florida store at the end of the day. We live and breathe Florida and know how to dress here.”

Compared to buying for Naples, Marissa is able to take a chance on small labels and buy more than a size run in Palm Beach. The chances of clients showing up to an event in the same outfit in smaller Naples is too risky. But both locations are trending younger.
“Our mentality is that Palm Beach is a laboratory,” said Hartington, of learning from its younger demographic and applying that confidence to be more dynamic in Naples. “We realized we weren’t attacking Naples like we could have. So many people moved there in COVID-19.”
Palm Beach store designer Harry Heissmann is involved with the renovation of the 20,000-square-foot Naples store, about half of which is selling space, over the summer. Hartington envisions adding an event space upstairs for fashion, jewelry and vintner dinners, bridal and baby showers and a salon series. He’s excited that a boutique hotel is opening across the street (Third Street South) in Naples, and for the mini–Marissa Collections to open in the renovated Ritz-Carlton, Naples in the fall. A car service will ferry guests to and from the flagship.
Marissa Collections is coming up on its 50th anniversary in 2025, but its namesake has no plans to retire, according to her son.
“She doesn’t golf.”

Bvlgari Continues Celebrating Italian and Middle Eastern Cultural Bonds With its New Ramadan Campaign

Bvlgari Continues Celebrating Italian and Middle Eastern Cultural Bonds With its New Ramadan Campaign

This Ramadan, Bvlgari is continuing to honor the ties between Italian and Middle Eastern cultures with its story that first started in 2021. In its second chapter, the luxury jewelry house presents an enchanting short film showcasing its exclusive capsule collection for the season, featuring never-before-seen pieces from the Iconic Divas’ Dream collection.
Photo: Courtesy of Bvlgari
The set features malachite gemstones and a full French pavé, with an exclusive malachite pendant available only in Saudi Arabia. In further celebration of the Holy Month, the capsule will also feature the iconic Serpenti Forever jewelry box bag, this time in stunning champagne-colored calf leather. The collection takes center stage in this year’s campaign film, worn by the Italian character of ‘Sofia’ who once again sets on on a journey to experience the gems and attractions of the cultural landscape of the Middle East. On her trip, Sofia is reunited and even seen with new faces that indulge her in their homes’ delights, such as learning how to cook lugaimat, a traditional Emirati dessert.
Photo: Courtesy of Bvlgari
Her hosts include Emirati entrepreneur Mthayel Al Ali, Saudi adventurer Raha Moharrak, Dubai-based traveler and TV presenter Mohammed Sal, and Saudi fashion blogger Lama Alakeel. They are all joined by Sofia as they embark on a heritage-enriched journey of a desert camel ride and an abra across the creek of an old village. The film also features Abu Dhabi’s up-and-coming ceramic artist Hessa Al Ajmani, representing the rich Emirati art and crafts scene.
Photo: Courtesy of Bvlgari
“We couldn’t wait to narrate again this sentimental moment of reunion during the Holy Month of Ramadan,” says Sonia Maghraoui, Bvlgari’s marketing and communications director. “The film is filled with special moments of joy, celebration, and togetherness for our audience to enjoy and escape with.”
Read Next: Meet the Iranian-American Winner of the Very First Bulgari Contemporary Art Award in Dubai

Exclusive: Balqees Fathi Gets Into the Spirit of Ramadan With MARLI New York’s New Jewelry Collection

Exclusive: Balqees Fathi Gets Into the Spirit of Ramadan With MARLI New York’s New Jewelry Collection

Photo: Courtesy MARLI
Among the list of the most loved musicians in the region is the name of Balqees Fathi, more often lovingly known by her fans simply as Balqees. Over the years, the Emirati-Yemeni singer, who has also counted herself as a UN Champion for Women’s Rights in the Middle East, hasn’t just taken over with her powerful voice and strong opinions, but also her unique style. A reflection of her fiery personality, Fathi’s wardrobe comes with more than its fair share of statement-makers, and it seems like her taste in jewelry falls perfectly in line with the aesthetic. This festive season, the musician is getting into the spirit of Ramadan with a special collaboration, lending her face to the Ramadan campaign of jewelry house MARLI.
Though its home may be the dynamic city of New York, MARLI takes inspiration from Asia, Europe and the Middle East, and manages to strike a cord with women across the globe with its minimal shapes—and oh, so wearable—designs. For Ramadan 2022, founder and creative director Maral Artinian crafted what is now called the Tip Top collection, a sparkling series of earrings, bracelets, neckpieces and rings that blur the lines between traditional and contemporary jewelry. And to share the collection with the world, Balqees Fathi was a natural choice. “Balqees embodies the MARLI persona,” Artinian reveals to Vogue Arabia. “She is independent, accomplished, and carefree. Her personality and perseverance inspired this collaboration.”
Photo: Courtesy MARLI
Dressed in free-flowing modest ensembles, Balqees Fathi plays the perfect muse for MARLI’s Tip-Top collection, which feature diamonds and precious stones in blue for an unexpected twist. Describing her relationship with the brand as “magnetic”, the star shared, “I was always fascinated with MARLI creations and I have always been a MARLI client since they launched in the region. The TVC concept has an extraordinary story line to celebrate Ramadan… It was a privilege to work with the team and Angy Akly, the creative producer and director.” In an exclusive chat with Vogue Arabia, the musicians opens up about her favorite Ramadan rituals, her festive style, and of course, all things jewelry.
Congratulations on starring in MARLI’s Ramadan campaign! Can you tell us about your most precious pieces of jewelry? 
I have two pieces of jewelry that are very dear to me: a gold bracelet from my dad which I wore as a kid and see in all my childhood pictures, and the second piece was a necklace gifted by my grandmother, may she rest in peace, after I graduated from school, and I still have both these pieces to this day.
From sharp pantsuits to shimmering jumpsuits, your fans have seen you acing it all. But what is Balqees’s true personal style? What do you love to wear when you’re not out and about?
I’m a person who loves to change and you can see it even in my art. Being able to perform in different facets helped me to get closer to my audience. My personal style is always minimalistic, at a times even carefree, but always with a statement.
Photo: Courtesy MARLI
Is your style any different during the Holy Month of Ramadan? What is your ideal iftar look?
Elegant, minimalistic, and I love wearing a kaftan or an abaya.
How important is jewelry in defining your personal style?
It’s a part of my lifestyle, wherever I go, wherever or whenever I have an appearance; it wouldn’t be complete without the perfect piece of jewelry
Ramadan is a special time for all. What’s your favorite Ramadan tradition?
Being with my family, including all the beautiful the gatherings, and reunions — the whole Ramadan vibe.
The festive season helps us all come together with the people that matter most to us. How do you like to spend quality time with your family?
Family always comes first; I cherish every moment that I spend with my son.
Photo: Courtesy MARLI
It’s safe to say that music is, of course, a major part of your life. While your voice has inspired many, who are the musicians that most inspire you?
Definitely Fayrouz is my inspiration, and of course those who created change in the East and the West such as Alicia Keys, Beyoncé, and Celine Dion.
And finally, Ramadan is a time of self-reflection and appreciating everything in our lives. If you could gift someone a piece of jewelry from MARLI, what would it be? Who would you gift it to?
I would give the timeless MARLI Cleo bracelet to my elementary school teacher. I always remember her; she was very patient and kind to me.

The Secret Messages Hidden in Avril Lavigne’s Heart-Shaped, and Jennifer Lopez’s Green Engagement Rings

The Secret Messages Hidden in Avril Lavigne’s Heart-Shaped, and Jennifer Lopez’s Green Engagement Rings

Avril Lavigne and Mod Sun. Photo: Instagram.com/avrillavigne
In a week that saw the engagements of two much-loved singers—Avril Lavigne and Jennifer Lopez—also come two unique rings with jewelry inspiration in tow.
Photo: Instagram.com/avrillavigne
On Thursday, Canadian star Avril Lavigne announced her engagement to fellow musician Derek Ryan Smith, known as Mod Sun, who popped the question in Paris on March 27. Given that engagement rings with an emotional meaning have been a trend for long, and that Lavigne is known for her stand-out pop punk style, the ‘Sk8er Boi’ singer’s rock had to be just as special. While in the City of Love, against a romantic backdrop of the Eiffel Tower, Mod Sun asked Lavigne to marry him with a heart-shaped diamond ring. What’s more, the ring is also marked with a personalized inscription. “It has the words ‘Hi Icon’ engraved in it, which were the first words he ever said to me,” the 37-year-old told People. “And it has Mod + Avril on the inside. He knew from the very beginning I wanted a heart-shaped diamond because on the day we met, we had matching heart-shaped pavéd rings on. We’ve worn them every day since, so it’s only fitting to have a heart-shaped engagement ring. I love it so much.”
Photo: Instagram.com/avrillavigne
Mod Sun enlisted Lavigne’s friend and designer Caryn Alpert at the celebrity-loved XIV Karats for the custom-made ring. “He knew that he really wanted to do something with hearts and have the most dazzling, biggest, flawless heart-shaped ring for her,” Alpert told Page Six of the 5-carat stone set in a royal setting and featuring little diamond hearts on the band. “They also have a connection to France and royalty and he wanted it to look like a crown too, so there’s a lot of beautiful detail around the heart shape itself,” said the designer.

Major announcement!!!! https://t.co/G5oGxtX0z5 pic.twitter.com/HTIqbHMJ2M
— jlo 💍 (@JLo) April 9, 2022

While Lavigne’s sparkler made headlines for its distinct shape, Lopez’s did the same for its extraordinary color. The star announced her engagement to actor Ben Affleck for the second time, via her newsletter On the JLo, and showed off her ring which appears to be a 8.5ct natural green diamond set on a silver band. According to an older newsletter from Lopez, the color of the stone is particularly meaningful. “I always say the color green is my lucky color. Maybe you can remember a certain green dress,” the 52-year-old had written, referring to her viral moment in the iconic Versace jungle print dress. “I’ve realized there are many moments in my life where amazing things happened when I was wearing green.”
Lopez’s engagement ring as seen in the announcement video
Previous engagement rings received by Lopez have been equally noteworthy, with Affleck presenting her with a ring featuring a pink stone set between two diamond baguettes for their first engagement.
Read Next: Jennifer Lopez Reveals What Her Dream Proposal Looks Like

The Most Dazzling Jewelry Moments From Each Decade Of The Queen’s Reign

The Most Dazzling Jewelry Moments From Each Decade Of The Queen’s Reign

Photo: Getty
This year, Queen Elizabeth II will be celebrating her Platinum Jubilee, the first British monarch in history to reach such a milestone. Seven decades have passed since the death of her father, King George VI, during which she has earned a reputation not only of devotion to the monarchy and her people, but also as one of the best dressed women of our time.
None of the Queen’s outfits would be complete without her jewelry, however – from historic gems passed down from queen to queen through the centuries to recently acquired jewels. In the daytime, she is almost never seen without a pearl necklace, glittering brooch, and pearl earrings. For formal evening events, a necklace or tiara will be pulled out from the vault.
Despite having access to an awe-inspiring number of jewels, the Queen views them casually as being part of her uniform. Her sister, Princess Margaret, once marveled that Her Majesty was the only woman she knew who could put on her own tiara while walking down the stairs to attend an event.

Here, Vogue highlights key jewelry moments from each decade of the Queen’s 70-year reign.
Posing after her historic Coronation ceremony in 1953
Photo: Getty
For the actual moment of crowning, the gold St Edward’s Crown was used, but was then switched for the Imperial State Crown for the rest of the day. The Imperial State Crown was designed by Rundell, Bridge & Rundell for Queen Victoria in 1839. It is set with several historic stones: St Edward’s sapphire, Queen Elizabeth I’s pearl earrings, The Black Prince’s ruby, the Stuart sapphire and The Cullinan II. It was remade by Garrard in 1937 to be lightened for King George VI, but still weighs 2.3 pounds.
The Queen has spoken about the weight of the crown when worn during the State Opening of Parliament. “You can’t look down to read the speech – you have to take the speech up. Because if you did, your neck would break, or it would fall off. So there are some disadvantages to crowns, but otherwise they’re quite important things.”
The necklace and earrings worn that day are appropriately known as The Coronation Necklace and Earrings. In the 1850s, Queen Victoria had to return a number of Hanoverian heirlooms to her cousin the King of Hanover, including her grandmother Queen Charlotte’s diamond necklace. As a replacement, Queen Victoria had this new necklace and earrings created by dismantling jewels from “swords and useless things” belonging to King George III.
Attending the Royal Variety Performance in 1967
Photo: Getty
The Lover’s Knot Tiara was made by Garrard in 1913 for Queen Mary using stones from a tiara she was given for her wedding. Queen Mary had a passion for jewels, especially those with family history, so she had Garrard copy the design from a tiara belonging to her grandmother Princess Augusta, which was inherited by her aunt. The Queen inherited the tiara from Queen Mary in 1953 and later famously gave it to Diana, Princess of Wales as a wedding present. It’s now worn by Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge.
The necklace worn by the Queen was a Golden Jubilee gift to Queen Victoria from a committee called The Women’s Jubilee Offering. Originally the committee hoped to raise £10,000 to create a statue of Prince Albert, but when more than £84,000 of donations poured in, the committee set aside £5,000 to purchase this necklace from Carrington & Co. Queen Victoria designated this piece as an heirloom of the Crown.
The earrings worn by the Queen are from Queen Alexandra’s Wedding Parure, given to Queen Alexandra by King Edward VII for their wedding in 1863. The diamond bracelet on the Queen’s wrist was a wedding present from Prince Philip. Philip had used diamonds from a tiara given to him by his mother, Princess Alice of Greece, to design a bracelet and engagement ring for his future wife. The Queen has worn the bracelet frequently throughout her reign but in recent years has loaned it to the Duchess of Cambridge.
On a royal visit to Finland in 1976
Photo: Getty
The Vladimir Tiara was made for Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna, wife of Grand Duke Vladimir in the 1870s. Designed as a row of interlocking diamond circles with pearl pendants, it is believed to have been made by Bolin, and often graced the head of the Grand Duchess during her famous parties. The Grand Duchess was forced to flee Russia during the Russian Revolution, leaving her jewels behind hidden in a secret compartment in her St Petersburg palace. Eventually, on behalf of the Grand Duchess, a British officer dressed as a worker snuck into the palace, retrieved the Grand Duchess’s famous collection of jewels, and returned them to her once out of the country.
After the Grand Duchess’s death in 1920, her children sold part of her collection, this tiara being purchased by Queen Mary. Once in London, the tiara was repaired, having been damaged during the escape from Russia, and Queen Mary had the pearl drops made interchangeable with the Cambridge Emeralds: a collection of emeralds inherited from her grandmother Princess Augusta (who won them in a lottery in Frankfurt shortly after her marriage in 1818).
The Queen inherited the tiara in 1953 and enjoys wearing the drops interchangeably. On occasion, she will go for an all-diamond look and wear the tiara without any drops. The necklace and earrings were made by Garrard for Queen Mary to wear at the 1911 Delhi Durbar using some of the Cambridge Emeralds.
The Dorset Bow Brooch is pinned to the Queen’s sash. It was a wedding present to Queen Mary in 1893 from the County of Dorset. Queen Mary later gave it to the Queen as a wedding present in 1947.
Greeting members of the public on a state visit to Portugal in 1986
Photo: Getty
Here, the Queen is wearing the oldest set of jewelry in her collection, the Kent Amethyst Parure. The parure belonged to Princess Victoria, Queen Victoria’s mother. Consisting of a necklace, earrings, three brooches, and a pair of side combs, the parure was made an heirloom of the Crown by Queen Victoria. The parure is vary rarely worn, but the Queen enjoys wearing the brooches. On one occasion in 1902, Queen Alexandra wore the necklace cascading down the skirt of her dress.
The tiara worn here is the Queen’s favorite, referred to affectionately as Granny’s Tiara. The Girls of Great Britain and Ireland presented this to Queen Mary in 1893 as a wedding present. The tiara is designed with diamond festoons and scrolls on a detachable diamond base. It was originally topped with pearls, but these were removed and used to create the Lover’s Knot Tiara. The Queen has worn this tiara most frequently, and it is probably her most recognizable piece, being featured on currency around the world.
Attending a state banquet in 1990
Photo: Getty
The necklace and earrings worn here are some of the Queen’s most cherished jewels. Her father King George VI purchased them from Carrington & Co in 1947 and gave them to her as a wedding present. In the 1960s, the Queen found she was without a sapphire tiara, and in 1963, she purchased this one at auction. Her diamond and sapphire bracelet was acquired the same year, completing the parure.
The brooch pinned to the Queen’s sash is the Albert Sapphire Brooch and was given to Queen Victoria by Prince Albert on the eve of their wedding in 1840. Queen Victoria recorded in her diary, “My precious Albert gave me a splendid and lovely brooch of an immense sapphire, set round with diamonds; it is quite beautiful.” Queen Victoria designated this piece as an heirloom of the Crown, and it has been worn by every Queen since.
Smiling in the middle of a trip to Malta in 2005
Photo: Getty
Prince Philip was stationed with the Royal Navy in Malta between 1949 and 1951, and on her visits there, the Queen was able to briefly experience life as any other newlywed wife. Prince Philip’s cousin Lady Pamela Hicks recalled, “The Queen really loved living in Malta because she was able to lead a normal life, wander through the towns and go shopping. It was the only place that she was able to live the life of a naval officer’s wife, just like all the other wives.”
Prince Albert designed the Oriental Circlet Tiara, which was made in 1853 for Queen Victoria, who designated it as an heirloom of the Crown. Originally, the tiara was set with opals but Queen Alexandra believed opals to be unlucky and had them replaced with rubies. The tiara was a favorite of the Queen Mother, so much so that the Queen allowed her to retain it after ascending the throne when it should have been passed on.
The Queen’s necklace is known as the Baring Ruby Necklace, as it was acquired from the Baring Collection in 1964. She paired this set of jewels with Queen Mary’s Ruby Earrings. The earrings, which consist of large rubies surrounded by nine diamonds, were a birthday present to Queen Mary from King George V in 1926.
Hosting a state visit in 2019, one of her last before the pandemic
Photo: Getty
The Burmese Ruby Tiara was created by Garrard for the Queen in 1973. The rubies used in the tiara were from a necklace presented to the Queen as a wedding present from the Burmese people. The necklace consisted of 96 rubies, which by Burmese custom would protect the wearer from the 96 diseases that can afflict a human. The diamonds used in the tiara were taken from another wedding gift, a tiara from the Nizam of Hyderabad. The new tiara is designed as a wreath of ruby roses, inspired by the Tudor rose, connected by diamond and ruby sprays.
The necklace and earrings worn by the Queen were made for Queen Victoria and originally set with opals instead of rubies. They were left as heirlooms of the Crown by Queen Victoria. Queen Alexandra had the opals replaced with rubies in 1902.
Her outfit is completed with the diamond-studded insignia of the Order of the Garter and the Family Orders of King George V and King George VI. Royal Family Orders are given to female family members by the monarch and feature their miniature portrait in a diamond frame on a silk ribbon.
Originally published in Vogue.co.uk

HH Sheikha Sana Al Maktoum Reveals Her New Jewelry Collection with Healing Crystals for Ramadan

HH Sheikha Sana Al Maktoum Reveals Her New Jewelry Collection with Healing Crystals for Ramadan

A passionate jewelry designer and philanthropist, Her Highness Sheikha Sana Al Maktoum reveals a new collection that shows her fierce determination.
Abaya, shaila, 13:09; dress, Sekka38; Radiance earrings in lapis lazuli, Harmony ring and Inspire ring in lapis lazuli, Sana Al Maktoum Fine Jewellery. Vogue Arabia, April 2022. Photo: Ziga Mihelcic
Born to an artist mother, Emirati Sheikha Sana Al Maktoum was exposed to creativity and the arts from a young age. Years spent admiring beautiful jewelry pieces passed down through her family members played an integral part in the royal choosing to create her own pieces – jewelry that sparked emotions and the desire for safekeeping. “Something that could be handed down from generation to generation and at the same time, something utterly feminine, ethereal, and contemporary,” she remarks.
Founding her eponymous brand in 2020 – at just 21 years old – Sheikha Sana entered the jewelry world with unbridled passion. “Launching Sana Al Maktoum Fine Jewellery was no easy feat and like many other businessowners, I am involved in every aspect,” she says. Her second collection, Talisman, draws inspiration from the art deco style of the 1920s. “I’ve always loved the Twenties; it was about the first time when women would start to be empowered in society as well as viewed as equals, and it felt right to draw inspiration from such a transformative era,” she notes. In her new collection, Sheikha Sana incorporates crystals with purported healing properties. “The main motivation behind this is my own spiritual journey where I was exposed to the healing power of crystals,” she says of the capsule consisting of 13 pieces where crystals, gold, and diamonds intersperse. “Created with intention, these pieces will identify with the rising need for incorporating healing crystals in our lives,” she continues, offering that her jewelry is for women who are not afraid to showcase their soft power, and are proud of their femininity and contributions to society.
Talisman necklace in malachite. Vogue Arabia, April 2022. Photo: Ziga Mihelcic
The first preview of the Talisman collection took place at an International Women’s Day dinner hosted in collaboration with Harrods. “I was over the moon to be collaborating with Harrods. After showcasing the My Treasure collection in Christie’s last year, this seemed like the right next step,” considers the royal. The Talisman collection’s launch coincides with Ramadan, making it a precursor to a spiritual time of the year.
Her debut My Treasure butterfly-themed collection drew inspiration from her late grandmother and namesake Sheikha Sana’a, whom she remarks was a force to be reckoned with. “The butterfly is a tribute to my grandmother, as she is my greatest inspiration and my muse. My grandmother was one of the first educated Emirati businesswomen and I’m often told by family members that I have her spirit guiding me always. She was the leading light for the empowerment of Emirati women here and I hope to carry the torch,” says Sheikha Sana. “The butterfly is also a symbol of transformation. A woman today has many roles to play and she is constantly transforming – from a child to a teenager, a college student to a working professional, a wife to a mother, a co-worker to a boss. I knew early on this would be the overriding theme of this collection.”
Abaya, shaila, Sekka38; dress, Taller Marmo; Abundance earrings in malachite, Inspire ring in malachite, Sana Al Maktoum Fine Jewellery. Vogue Arabia, April 2022. Photo: Ziga Mihelcic
Along with being an entrepreneur, Sheikha Sana believes in the empowerment of women and children’s education. “I have been on the ground working on discovering what women and children need – from creating and donating a painting called 634 for the Art 4 Sight auction organized by Noor Dubai and Sotheby’s to help raise money for the visually impaired, to celebrating UAE National Day with children of determination at Al Noor Training Centre, and hosting a lunch for orphans in collaboration with Red Crescent UAE.” Sheikha Sana also visits schools around Dubai and contributes to their reading programs through impactful donations to libraries. She has also inaugurated Fakeeh University Hospital’s new breast clinic.
Radiance earrings in lapis lazuli. Vogue Arabia, April 2022. Photo: Ziga Mihelcic
The royal’s interests don’t stop there. Along with fine arts, Sheikha Sana is also an avid sportswoman, and has a keen interest in fashion. When it comes to jewelry design, her mind is always buzzing with fresh ideas. “I am looking forward to expanding the Sana Al Maktoum Fine Jewellery business internationally – Harrods is just the beginning. I’m also looking at possible design collaborations,” she further adds.
Free-spirited and driven, the young designer doesn’t follow codes in her creations, only her inner inspiration. “I don’t like to follow trends. If you have a blank canvas, trends add color to the canvas, but the story is within you. You make the story and your expression of what you want to wear.” Recognizing that her own story starts as an Emirati woman, Sheikha Sana notes how blessed she feels to be surrounded by women who have supported her endeavors since their early days, stating, “The support of our community drives me, and I often find myself marveling at how far we have come.”
Read Next: Diamond: 37 Sparkling Jewelry Pieces for Those Who Love the April Birthstone
Originally published in the April 2022 issue of Vogue Arabia
Hair and makeup: Sara YunisLocation: Waldorf Astoria, DIFC

You Can Soon View Breakfast at Tiffany’s Original Script at This New Exhibition in London

You Can Soon View Breakfast at Tiffany’s Original Script at This New Exhibition in London

Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s
Displaying over 400 objects from their archives, Tiffany & Co. is launching its debut exhibition titled Vision & Virtuosity at London’s Saatchi Gallery. Celebrating its foundations in New York City from 1837 all the way up to now, the house of the world’s finest diamonds aims to tell its story in a unique way.
Anthony Ledru, President and Chief Executive Officer of Tiffany & Co. shared, “Vision & Virtuosity tells the extraordinary story of one of the oldest luxury jewelers, through its nearly 200-year history of pioneering creativity, legendary craftsmanship and sourcing of the world’s most extraordinary diamonds and gemstones.” He added, “This exhibition perfectly captures our long-standing heritage in bridging tradition and modernity. We are thrilled to share the world of Tiffany & Co. and our unique high jewelry style with London.”
Photo: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co
From high jewelry designs to the brand’s recently acquired Empire Diamond nearing over 80 carats, the exhibition takes guests on a journey of 185 years of its vision and virtuosity that is central to its values. The brand exhibition will also feature Tiffany’s famed window displays and important odes to popular culture, such as the original script from Breakfast at Tiffany’s, the 1961 romance comedy film which centers around the character Holly, who loves the brand store very much.
Photo: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co
Separate themes will be explored throughout the exhibition’s seven chapters, that place front and center Tiffany’s brand identity, heritage, and creative influence. “Since its inception, Tiffany & Co. has held a unique position within culture,” says Alexandre Arnault, Executive Vice President, Product & Communications, Tiffany & Co. “Vision & Virtuosity celebrates the House’s most defining moments, showcases the incredible collection of archives and exemplifies why Tiffany & Co. is such an iconic brand.”
Photo: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co.
Stepping into Saatchi gallery, visitors will dive into the rich history and legacy of founder Charles Lewis Tiffany while also gaining knowledge on the House’s creative forces, such as Jean Schlumberger and Elsa Peretti in the following chapter. The third chapter showcases the Blue Book High Jewelry collection, while the fourth chapter focuses on the heritage of the brand, highlighting the iconic Tiffany Setting engagement ring in 1886. The fifth room is especially dedicated to Breakfast at Tiffany’s, and the subsequent chapter offers a range of diamonds devoted to Tiffany’s creations. Finally, the legendary 128.54-carat Tiffany Diamond will also be available for viewing.
Photo: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co
A catalogue published by Assouline New York, available in two sizes, will also accompany the exhibition’s gift shop from June 10, 2022. The 160-page text will feature the highlights of the exhibition as well as showcase creations by everyone involved including Louis Comfort Tiffany, Gene Moore, Jean Schlumberger, Elsa Peretti, Paloma Picasso, and John Loring.
The “Vision & Virtuosity” exhibition will run from June 10 to August 19, 2022. Tickets will be available from May 2, 2022 on the Tiffany & Co. Exhibition app, on iOS and Google Play app stores, and at the exhibition.
Read Next: Exclusive: Adwoa Aboah is a Fashionable Superwoman in Fendi’s New Peekaboo Bag Film

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