Fashion

Deepika Padukone’s Second Ashi Studio Outfit for Cannes Film Festival Is This Custom Orange Gown

Deepika Padukone’s Second Ashi Studio Outfit for Cannes Film Festival Is This Custom Orange Gown

Photo: Instagram.com/deepikapadukone
After breaking the internet in an Ashi Studio dress at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival, Deepika Padukone has once again looked to a dramatic piece by the label this year. Today, the Indian star and jury member walked the red carpet for the premiere of The Innocent wearing a custom-made saffron dress from Saudi designer Ashi’s namesake brand. The strapless orange taffeta gown featured a floor-grazing hem and a weightless draped detail around the shoulders.
Photo: Instagram.com/deepikapadukone
The designer, who has previously featured on Vogue Arabia’s cover, has long been the go-to for stars looking to make a statement on the red carpet. This year alone, Ashi Studio’s pieces have been worn by celebrities including actor Kat Graham and models Izabel Goulart and Jourdan Dunn. As for Padukone, her ruffled pink dress by Ashi Studio worn in 2018 went down as one of her most extravagant looks, and cemented her place among the most anticipated stars at the Cannes Film Festival.
Ashi Studio’s dress of Deepika Padukone’s dress
The actor’s looks up until now have channeled her roots via a Sabyasachi sari, followed by her newly minted Louis Vuitton ambassadorship in a series of bold looks.

Check out all of Deepika Padukone’s Cannes Film Festival 2022 outfits below.
Deepika Padukone in Louis Vuitton. Photo: Getty
Deepika Padukone in Louis Vuitton. Photo: Getty
Deepika Padukone in Sabyasachi. Photo: Getty
Deepika Padukone in Sabyasachi Photo: Getty
Read Next: 30 Unforgettable Red Carpet Fashion Moments from Bollywood Star Deepika Padukone

Exclusive: Maria Tash Shares the 3 Tips Every Woman Should Follow When Shopping for Fine Jewelry

Exclusive: Maria Tash Shares the 3 Tips Every Woman Should Follow When Shopping for Fine Jewelry

Fine jewelry designer Maria Tash Photo: Courtesy Maria Tash
This summer, fine jewelry designer Maria Tash celebrated a milestone moment: the opening of her newest store, located in Prestige at The Avenues, Kuwait. Spread across a whopping 2,100 square feet, the new space is officially the third Maria Tash destination in the Middle East, with the first two opening in Dubai Mall in 2018, and Mall of Emirates in 2021. It’s clear that the entrepreneur has come a long way, having opened her first store in Manhattan’s East Village in 1993.
For Tash, it was important for the jewelry house’s Kuwait edition to tell her story through its interiors. Best known for pushing the envelope with minimalistic sparklers that tempt every shopper to load up on piercings, the designer’s new space is all about clean lines, sleek shapes, and modern detailing, bringing together a palette of soft grays, custom glass and leather and metallic accents. Perched right next to Fauchon, Tiffany, and Van Cleef & Arpels, the boutique also boasts a private ‘women’s only’ lounge, ensuring that every visitor has a comfortable shopping experience.
Maria Tash boutique in Kuwait. Photo: Courtesy Maria Tash
“It has been a long journey,” Tash says triumphantly about the Kuwait store during a chat with Vogue Arabia. “I did two very successful pop-ups in 2016 in Kuwait and I have been waiting to open in the country since. I signed the store lease in the Prestige section of The Avenues a couple of years ago, but we could not get into the country to establish all of the corporate setups and fly specialized employees in due to Covid.” After years of waiting, the new flagship doesn’t just stand out for its envy-worthy interiors and invest-worthy customizable creations, but also for its futuristic touches. “It is the first location to have special tools I invented to visualize and preview jewelry for the patented Tash Helix and Hiddlen Tash Rook piercing locations,” she elaborates, proving that the only way for this fine jewelry designer is up.
A closer look inside the Kuwait store. Photo: Courtesy Maria Tash
She may still be basking in the glow of the success of her Kuwait store, but there isn’t much time to stop and smell the roses in Maria Tash’s world. As she gears up for her next big openings—Maria Tash will soon be making homes in Los Angeles, Dallas, and Paris—the designer of the moment sits down with Vogue Arabia for a quick chat, where she reveals her biggest jewelry insights, from her favorite memories, to the key pieces every woman should own, and much more. Dive in!
What is your first memory with jewelry?
My first memory is rummaging through my mother’s jewelry box and draping almost all of the pieces inside on myself.  She had a great laugh when she saw me with all of her necklaces on my tiny body. Little did she know how it would manifest later in life!
You’ve been in the jewelry industry for close to two decades now. Can you tell us how your love for jewelry came about?
My love of jewelry expressed itself [in my childhood] when I was drawing flowers and imagining them in jewelry. When I was 9, I was hammering metal sheets and wrapping wire into basic shapes. In my early teens, I started doing more daring designs, like attaching necklaces to studs between my ears, creating a suspended ear-to-ear effect, and wrapping wire between two fingers to create a “two finger ring”.
As a teen, I also became more involved with music—specifically goth and punk—and developed a love for multiple ear and nostril piercings. By the mid 1980s, I was gluing a gem in my navel (navel piercing were not available back then), because I thought it was beautiful, and was enamored by books showing images of Indian weddings and their elaborate multiple lobes, cartilage, nostril, and septum jewelry.
In the late 1980s, I moved to London and got my nostril double pierced and added multiple ear piercings. After completing college, I took a leap and opened my first store in the East Village, designing and fabricating jewelry and performing piercing daily on all areas of the body. My love for jewelry has been with me since I was a child, and continues today as I am still enthralled with gorgeous stones, unusual diamond cuts, clever mechanisms, and unique piercing locations.
The lapis luis collection. Photo: Courtesy Maria Tash
From New York and London to Dubai and Kuwait, your customizable fine jewelry seems to have global appeal. Do you notice a difference in the tastes of the Maria Tash consumer in different regions? What makes the Middle Eastern customer unique?
Social media has been a great way to equalize demand for certain ear curations. My Middle East clients love bold diamond pieces for all areas of the body, and are not afraid to get multiple piercings. My lotus marquise clusters are popular in the region, as well as my threaded diamond charms and studs in pear and marquise shapes. They also like the large silhouette-cut diamonds (a shape I have cut for the brand), as well as our floating diamond tassel earrings. I feel like my minimalistic, invisible diamond settings, patented mechanisms, and attention to detail are appreciated in the region. Much of what is popular in the Middle East is what I wear personally, and I’m very happy about that fact.
From your own collection, what are the key pieces that you think every woman should own, and why?
I really love my Floating Diamond Tassel Earrings, and my Floating Diamond Charm Studs. The Tassel Earrings I wear in both my earlobes and helix and are a favorite because they are just so lightweight, full of movement, and very sparkly. The diamond charm studs are a hybrid between the desirable movement features of a charm and the versatility of a stud, because they can be worn almost anywhere on the ear.
Invisible set diamond star stud earring in 18k white gold. Photo: Courtesy Maria Tash
I love movement and I love extremely minimalist stone settings. I gave a lot of thought with these studs as to how the beautiful diamond shapes could be gently suspended in the air, held minimally, emerge from hidden parts of the ear if desired, and sit perfectly flush with the ear. Also, I think a Maria Tash essential are my diamond eternity rings, like the five row pave rings, marquise invisible set rings, and invisible set round diamond rings. I like them in a snug fit with or without a charm hanging off for movement. These rings look great regardless of your piercing angle, sit so close to the skin, and feature my signature invisible setting and minimal pave setting.
Could you please share your top three tips on buying jewelry? 
First, find a piece you really love, and ideally can wear continuously. I strive to make pieces that are very “low profile” so that they sit extremely low to the skin, which makes them very comfortable for long-term wear. I believe everyone should wear pieces that are low profile, especially studs sticking off the ear and finger rings with stones that sit on top of the finger.  A very deliberate low profile setting prevents catching the stone settings on apparel, or the piece turning (on the finger) or pointing down or out (for ear studs) due to the weight and height of the jewelry above then skin.
Pearl and diamond eternity triple linked hoop earring and cuff in 18k rose gold. Photo: Courtesy Maria Tash
Secondly, I think investing in pieces that are at least 14k-18k or platinum is a wise investment because elemental gold, as a commodity, is at an all-time high. Diamonds also tend to hold their value. I have made the decision not to work with any diamond that is less than VS2/G in clarity/color so they continue to hold their value.  I would also choose a piece that is alloyed without nickel. In the US, almost all white gold is mixed with nickel, which makes it white.  The EU has a stricter standard, and it has always been part of the Maria Tash brand to keep nickel out of all of our gold, so no one will have an allergic reaction.
Lastly, really loving a piece of fine jewelry [is important] because of its beauty or its symbolism, and having it add confidence and pride in how you see yourself is its true value.

Get Ready with Salma Abu Deif for Her First Cannes Film Festival Red Carpet

Get Ready with Salma Abu Deif for Her First Cannes Film Festival Red Carpet

Before making her first-ever red carpet appearance at Cannes Film Festival, Salma Abu Deif gave Vogue Arabia an exclusive sneak peek behind her look. The Egyptian actor opted for a bold black dress by Pinko, paired with glittering Chopard jewelry, while her beauty look featured sleek hair and a bright red pout.
Watch the video above as Abu Deif shows us how she got ready for the big day.
Production: Koral Communication

Meghan Markle Revived Pretty Woman Style in Polka Dots For Prince Harry’s Polo Match

Meghan Markle Revived Pretty Woman Style in Polka Dots For Prince Harry’s Polo Match

Photo: Instagram.com
As Julia Roberts famously said in Pretty Woman, “I want the fairytale.” It’s a sentiment a young Meghan Markle – the California girl who went from small-screen star to royal bride when an English prince swept her off her feet – no doubt related to. And an outing for the Duchess of Sussex in Santa Barbara over the weekend suggests Vivian Ward’s post-makeover wardrobe made quite an impression on her, too.
The Duchess turned out to support her husband Prince Harry, a keen polo player, at the Santa Barbara Polo & Racquet Club, where his Los Padres team took home the Lisle Nixon Memorial trophy on Sunday, and her chosen outfit had more than a dash of Pretty Woman about it. Her breezy blouse with tie-front detail featured a polka-dot print – just like the dress Vivian wears to stomp the divots in the classic rom-com.
Photo: Instagram.com
Meghan added high-waisted tailored shorts like those that were central to Julia’s ’90s power wardrobe in the film, once she’d relieved the boutiques of Rodeo Drive of much of their stock. Black Aquazzura heels, the requisite hat, and movie-star Valentino shades completed the Duchess’s retro look.
Post-makeover Julia loved a polka dot print. Photo: Getty
Meghan’s crisp white shorts, cinched with a black belt for added polish, are by Khaite, a New York brand that keeps cropping up in her wardrobe. She paired founder Cate Holstein’s off-the-shoulder bodysuit with tailored black trousers to join Prince Harry on stage at the Invictus Games in The Hague earlier this year. Khaite is typical of the labels that Meghan – who relied on Emilia Wickstead dresses and Givenchy formalwear as a working royal living in the UK – now gravitates towards as a mum-of-two living a private (though no less high-profile) life with her young family in Montecito.
These days, her style leans easy, minimalist and neutral, with a luxe touch. Think: cashmere separates by The Row and Loro Piana suiting for business trips to New York, Chanel ballet flats to pose for a relaxed family portrait, and swathes of taupe Ralph Lauren for a visit to the British Embassy in the Netherlands.
Originally published in Vogue.co.uk

Dorra Zarrouk’s Ombré Maxi Dress is the Latest Addition to Her Colorful Summer Wardrobe

Dorra Zarrouk’s Ombré Maxi Dress is the Latest Addition to Her Colorful Summer Wardrobe

Photo: Instagram.com/dorra_zarrouk
This season, one need not look further than Dorra Zarrouk‘s Instagram account for summer dressing inspiration. The Tunisian actor has been taking to her social media in a kaleidoscope of colorful looks that range from a printed scarf top with jeans, to her latest, an ombré dress.
Photo: Instagram.com/dorra_zarrouk
Spotted posing at a picturesque location in her recent post, the actor offered her elevated take on the summer maxi, with a two-toned piece by Zimmerman. The strapless number came with a fitted, pink bodice that flows into a flared-out skirt featuring white blending into a wide blue hem. Allowing the dress to be the star of her outfit, Zarrouk accessorized it with a dainty diamond choker and bracelet, which makes the look that much easier to recreate should you wish to for your next daytime event. While her beauty look for the shoot was fairly neutral, Zarrouk sported a thin braid on one side of her middle-parted hair.
Previous noteworthy looks from the actor this season include a co-ord in vibrant citrus hues, a mini Valentino dress, and a hot pink suit paired with black and white sneakers.

Below, check out all of Zarrouk’s looks worth coveting this summer.
Photo: Instagram.com/dorra_zarrouk
Photo: Instagram.com/dorra_zarrouk
Photo: Instagram.com/dorra_zarrouk
Photo: Instagram.com/dorra_zarrouk
Photo: Instagram.com/dorra_zarrouk
Photo: Instagram.com/dorra_zarrouk
Read Next: Dorra Zarrouk Wore a Traditional Tunisian Jebba During Her Time in Saudi Arabia

The Stocks are Up for Balenciaga with a New Line, New Collaboration, and Disruptive Fashion Show

The Stocks are Up for Balenciaga with a New Line, New Collaboration, and Disruptive Fashion Show

Photo: Hunter Abrams
For any magazine editor or client, one of the most exciting moments of fashion week is the arrival of the invitation for the Balenciaga show. As usual, the coveted pass offers a hint of what the following show could entail, and can range from a simple golden thimble to wear around your neck to a smashed iPhone. This time, for the Resort 2023 show hosted over this weekend in New York City, the fashion fantasy started as guests received a paper bag with a stack of Balenciaga faux dollar bills. The immediate effect on social media was priceless.

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As we live in a society where according to Demna Gvasalia, “money is the ultimate fetiche”, the show was hosted at the iconic New York Stock Exchange, which was transformed into a powerful runway lit up by glitching screens, with models wearing fetishist rubber masks. It was all about high energy and fast-paced walking, in true New York City style.
Photo: Courtesy of Balenciaga
Photo: Courtesy of Balenciaga
Given that it is, after all, a French brand, all of Paris was pretty much present during the first section of Balenciaga’s show, as it used this occasion to debut its new line, Garde-Robe. Less exclusive than couture, but more elevated than regular ready-to-wear, Garde-Robe is all about luxe materials and sharp finishing, with a true Parisian DNA. Reinvented with new generous “Gvasalian” proportions—and mostly, in black—there were blouses with powerful shoulders and pussy bows, skirts and overcoats in embossed croc, silky trench coats, reconstructed tuxedos, and long bodycon dresses (the sparkly edition really caught our eye!) that will surely make wonders on Isabelle Huppert, one of the House muses.
Photo: Courtesy of Balenciaga
Photo: Courtesy of Balenciaga
While the first looks promised to please a more sophisticated audience, the second section at Balenciaga’s showcase brought in color and statement street wear. The new pieces (available only on the brand’s website and at the Madison Avenue boutique) are the result of a new collaboration with Adidas, which also recently partnered with Gucci. Once again, volumes were generous, with the visual identities of both brands merging in revisited logos.
Photo: Courtesy of Balenciaga
Photo: Courtesy of Balenciaga
If you ever attend a Balenciaga show, you’ll quickly realize that the style is not only on the runway, and it is a joy to witness the creativity of the fans of the brand. Among the guests, we spotted Kanye West (but no Kim Kardashian), Pharrell Williams, Chloë Sevigny, and Anna Wintour. This is a type of hype and star power that money can’t buy.
Read Next: Balenciaga’s Demna Opens Up About Facing Discrimination at a Paris Restaurant Because of His Clothing

The most stunning looks from the Cannes Film Festival 2022 red carpet

The most stunning looks from the Cannes Film Festival 2022 red carpet

Fashion

by Sarah Joseph
1 minute ago

VIEW GALLERY/ 18 IMAGES
The A-listers have been out in full force in the South of France to mark the 75th Cannes Film Festival.
While the festival celebrates the world of film, the fashion needs to be praised too as stars have flocked to the red carpet in a series of decadent and showstopping ensembles.
From Julia Roberts in a full Louis Vuitton look to regional stars such as Karen Wazen in custom-made gowns, we take a look at some of the most stunning ensembles from the Cannes Film Festival so far.
– For more on luxury lifestyle, news, fashion and beauty follow Emirates Woman on Facebook and Instagram
Images: Supplied & Feature image: Instagram

How Celebrity-Loved Lebanese High Jeweler Selim Mouzannar’s Pieces Marry Beirut, Paris, and Family Heritage

How Celebrity-Loved Lebanese High Jeweler Selim Mouzannar’s Pieces Marry Beirut, Paris, and Family Heritage

Emma Stone in Selim Mouzannar jewelry
In the heart of Beirut’s Achrafieh district lies one of the city’s crown jewels: the workshop of jeweler Selim Mouzannar. Walking through these old and winding, leafy streets, birdsong is conspicuously absent as the feathered friends hide from the cold. Beirut is an ongoing source of inspira­tion for Mouzannar and his office is a world away from the neighborhood’s French colonial architecture, and light years away from the chaos that is Beirut. Not a paper is out of place; the workshop is crisp and clean.
Selim Mouzannar
Soft edges caress white surfaces, and everything is contemporary. Ar­tisans buzz around in white coats like bees laden with nectar. In the midst of it all stands Selim Mouzannar. Effortlessly chic wearing round glasses, he surveys his personal crea­ ve kingdom and smiles. Hailing from a dynasty  of jewelers who supplied the Ottoman courts, Mouzannar has jewelry in his blood. Due to poli­tical turmoil and upheavals, his family left Syria in 1860 and settled in Beirut, immersing themselves in Lebanese life. Mouzannar flirted with the idea of becoming a journalist, but family tradition and a sense of responsibility steered him toward goldsmithing, and he embraced his heritage. In 1981, Mouzannar went abroad to study gemology and mineralogy in Paris and Antwerp. An internship in New York followed before he ended up in Saudi Arabia working for Robert Mouawad, the scion of another Beirut jewelry family. Later, he would work hard to educate himself in business and communica­ on, all the while aveling the world, from France to the US, Thailand to Myanmar, soaking up inspira­tion as he went and spending ­ time at the ruby mines of Païlin in Cambodia.
Fish for Love necklace in pink gold andgreen enamel, set with diamonds
“I’ve seen open mining in Thailand, on the ground; I’ve experienced the bohemian side of the business,” reflects Mouzannar. “It’s nothing special being a jeweler in the family. It’s not an honorable thing, it’s actually the easiest path to take.” His father was a modest jeweler working out of Beirut’s old souks, but upon his return to Beirut in 1993, the younger Mouzannar stuck out on his own. “There was a conflict of ideas [with my father]. Nothing major, but I decided to start alone,” he shares. His flagship store opened in 2006, the year Israel and Lebanon went to war. Seeing that his prospects within the coun y were limited, and not just because of the war – “There was no room to grow,” he recalls – he chose to look further afield. “I decided to enroll in major exhibitions abroad and found out how much the international market was interested in my designs, in Paris, London, and the UAE. In particular, an exhibition under the foundation of Sheikha Shamsa bint Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum – the impact was amazing,” he says, a little wide-eyed. Today, his work is sold at Harrods, Net-A-Porter, Bergdorf Goodman, and Le Bon Marché, and is worn by Jennifer Lawrence, Michelle Pfeiffer, Emma Stone, and more.
Istanbul pendant
Mouzannar’s clientele share his values: they first seek something they are comfortable with. “Something that gives them joy through the colors I use and, like everyone, we all want to own a timeless object. I always try to find this sort of client,” notes the jeweler. The key to his success is his artisans, and his ongoing love of learning and self-improvement. “I go back to the artisans. I don’t believe a designer can be a real designer without knowing the minimum of the business. The progress, how the piece starts and finishes… You can’t design something without understanding the process. This is why I am always in the workshop,” he says.
Gala Gonzalez in Selim Mouzannar jewelry
It’s this dedication to craft that sets Mouzannar apart. His pieces are easy to spot: there’s a distinct, unapologetic style. “The world of gems is huge, it’s part of the earth, and part of nature. You must have your own DNA. It’s so easy to get into the trend, but you will be like a sheep, just another manufacturer, like many on the market,” he states. Mouzannar’s business is niche enough to bestow a degree of rarity to each design. ” There are thousands of jewelers out there, but precious few have such a personal s˜ le as his. Mouzannar’s latest collection is called Aïda. Replete with transparent mineral enamel, the pieces are a kaleidoscope of greens, blues, and oranges. It’s a poetic name, bringing to mind the opera and Egypt in its heyday. “By coincidence, my mother’s name is Aïda,” smiles the jeweler. Alongside it is Rose de France, a collection featuring special hexagonal step cuts mounted in a contemporary style with gold, paying tribute to the Republic. “If you see the map of France, it looks like a hexagon,” he explains.
Rachel Brosnahan in Selim Mouzannar jewelry
To date, Mouzannar has launched 15 collections. Each is unique as he doesn’t conform to a set approach, giving free reign to his creativity. “I do what I love, over more than 40 years of working. I was 21 when I started in Saudi. I learned so much, more in a day than you learn here in years, and that experience carries from one place to another,” he offers. In the same way that a gemstone is polished, Paris polished Mouzannar, professionally and personally. “For me, both Paris and Beirut are the most important cities. I believe in universalism, I love many cultures, which I learned to appreciate ¡ om Asia to Europe to the Arab world,” he says. It’s this appreciation for culture, for universal style that informs every Selim Mouzannar piece – unique and universal, it speaks to a creator steeped in culture and always striving for excellence.
Read Next: The 12 Most Interesting Jewelry Trends Spotted on the Runway This Season
Originally published in the May 2022 issue of Vogue Arabia

How Louis Vuitton, Dior And Fendi Are Selling On Their Leftover Fabrics

How Louis Vuitton, Dior And Fendi Are Selling On Their Leftover Fabrics

Not so long ago, deadstock – a term used to describe surplus materials – was considered something of a dirty word in fashion. “The first time we used deadstock and talked about it was in 2017,” Gabriela Hearst, who has set a goal of eliminating the use of virgin materials at her eponymous brand by the end of 2022, previously told Vogue. “It was like using a bad word: ‘You don’t say that word in the luxury vocabulary.’”
Thankfully, that’s all changed in recent years, with an increasing number of designers now using upcycled fabrics as sustainability concerns within the industry continue to grow. But the logistical challenges around sourcing and utilising deadstock still remain – which is where deadstock resale platform Nona Source, funded by Louis Vuitton-owner LVMH, comes in.
“When we saw these mountains of fabrics, which were so beautiful, it was natural to start this project,” co-founder Romain Brabo, a former materials buyer for Givenchy and Kenzo, tells Vogue. “There is real demand [for deadstock], and I think Covid has accelerated everything.”
Letting rolls and rolls of the highest-quality jacquards, chiffons and silks go to waste would be a crying shame at any rate – but particularly when you consider that the production of materials makes up the biggest part of fashion’s environmental footprint. “We are an accelerator for brands to think out of the box and to be able to create with waste,” Brabo continues. “It’s important because this is one of the first steps into a circular economy,” adds co-founder Anne Prieur du Perray.
So far, major LVMH brands including Louis Vuitton, Dior, Celine and Fendi are among those selling on their deadstock materials via Nona Source, with the platform aiming to have all the company’s fashion houses participating by the end of the year. “We have maisons [selling to us] but also buying from us, so we have internal circularity,” Prieur du Perray explains.
While LVMH-funded, the resale platform is open for everyone to buy from, with younger designers being a particular focus. “There are designers looking for quality materials but who can’t afford them because they’re very expensive, or the quantities they need to order are very high – so we [created an] offering that could match their needs,” Brabo says.
Among those is Richard Malone, who has long put sustainability at the heart of his brand’s ethos. “Nona Source has afforded us the opportunity to develop new ways of working – continuing to grow horizontally without it being so resource-intensive,” the designer explains. “[The platform] addresses some of the main problems that young designers face, including minimum order quantity requirements.”
“Working with Nona Source [is] beneficial for a small business and brand like my own, especially with their sustainable approach,” Bianca Saunders, another designer who uses Nona Source, adds. “Fabrics can be sourced online easily, with a quick turnaround time.”
Although Nona Source is primarily a digital platform, the company has launched showrooms in Paris and now in London, at The Mills Fabrica in King’s Cross, in order for designers to view the deadstock materials in person. “Our clients wanted to touch and feel before buying,” Brabo explains. “[Opening in London] is a really important step for us; we have so many designers here.”
While using deadstock is an imperfect solution going forward (much more needs to be done to tackle overproduction to begin with), making it as easy as possible for designers to utilize the leftover fabrics that currently exist can only be a good thing. “For now, we haven’t explored everything that we can do with deadstock,” Prieur du Perray concludes. “So it’s a journey – and we are only just beginning.”
Originally published in Vogue.co.uk

Get Ready with Fatima AlBanawi for the Cannes Film Festival 2022

Get Ready with Fatima AlBanawi for the Cannes Film Festival 2022

After serving up a showstopping style moment on her first red carpet for this year’s Cannes Film Festival, Fatima Al Banawi took Vogue Arabia behind the scenes of her next red carpet appearance of the week. While a holographic caped dress by Rami Kadi was the Saudi actor and filmmaker’s choice for the premiere of Top Gun: Maverick, this time, she stepped out in a lilac frothy-hemmed number by another Lebanese designer, Georges Chakra, and Cartier jewelry.
Watch how she glammed up for the evening, made her dress selection, and more, in the video above.
Production and art direction: Alessandra Tomaso

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