Fashion Show Reviews

Bottega Veneta RTW Spring 2022

Bottega Veneta RTW Spring 2022

Why Detroit?The first time Daniel Lee came to the Motor City was by accident. The British designer was on his way to Jamaica when a daylong layover led to a love affair with what many would consider flyover country.
Fast forward six years to now when the Bottega Veneta creative director chose to stage his third road-tripping Salon series runway show there, the first time in America.
“I wanted to shine a spotlight on Detroit so people can see what greatness is here,” said Lee, a lover of fast cars, techno music and interesting architecture, who was also drawn to the city because it felt a bit like home.
“Detroit and Manchester have a connection,” said the native of northwest England, which experienced a similar economic boom and bust. “Manchester is the industrial heartland of the U.K., and Detroit is the industrial heartland of America.”

Lee became further enamored of the city after seeing Jim Jarmusch’s 2013 partly shot-in-Detroit vampire romance “Only Lovers Left Alive,” which led him to his show venue, the decadently decaying parking deck at the historic Michigan Building Theatre.

A legendary music spot for Big Bands and rock ‘n’ roll until 1976, the theater had to close in part because it didn’t have enough parking for Detroit’s car-reliant citizens. When it was later converted into an office building, some of the floors were turned into parking structures, which still retain the ornate plasterwork archways and balconies from theater days past.
It was a gorgeously moody spot for 200 or so guests to gather to see some spring fashion, including Mary J. Blige, Lil Kim, Burna Boy, Debi Mazar and Jeff Koons, alongside local celebrities Awenate Cobbina, chief executive officer of Shinola parent company Bedrock Group; Library Street Collective gallerists JJ and Anthony Curis; fashion designer Tracy Reese, and pioneering techno DJs Moodymann and Carl Craig, who designed the light and sound.
On the runway, Lee conjured a potent glam Americana with sport utility, innovative materials, shine and curving lines paying homage to the city’s industrial and sonic history.

Bottega Veneta Spring 2022
Lexie Moreland/WWD

Oversize jeans and denim jackets were engineered with metal threads, so they could be squashed and shaped. Technical nylon shirt dresses and parkas came with sculptural, perma pushed-up sleeves, some as big as Michelin man muscles. Knit tracksuits with zip front jackets and flared slit pants had a new, spongy industrial-looking wide weave reminiscent of seatbelts, with sleek knit tank dresses ending in carwash pleats.
Lee also tuned into the city’s history of Motown glam with a fab chartreuse crystal dusted knit polo and skirt set, fit ‘n’ flare metal-edged eyelet dance dresses, black liquid jersey draped dresses and a diva’s dream of a white shearling coat. He used a seductive Tyrone Lebon 2020 legs-and-heels image of  Mica Arganaraz wearing Bottega on a cool toweling wrap dress, a duster robe and several other collectible pieces.
He served up plenty of his beloved acid-laced flouro colors and wonderfully weird surface textures, including barnacle-like rubber beads that rustled as they hustled down the runway, and glossy metallic sequins. (Lourdes Leon, whose mama Madonna hails from Detroit, was one of the high-profile catwalkers.)
“The idea was to think about American design, workwear, denim and sportswear and doing that in an engineered way,” said Lee, sharing that for him, Bottega is about simplicity but also innovative technique.

Bottega Veneta Spring 2022
Lexie Moreland/WWD

The effect was exciting, sensual and pleasingly modern with enough casual-accessible sportswear to easily merge into an everyday wardrobe.
Accessories were covetable as ever, from new glossy leather hobos and soft-woven Intrecciato squeeze bags to the sport mesh heeled sandals, pointy-toed pumps and the Puddle boot reinterpreted as a high-top sneaker — all of which should keep the Bottega Veneta hype engine running.
Cool clothes aside, the optics of a European luxury brand swooping into an American city that has been a symbol of de-industrialization, racial tension and urban blight, and using it as a set piece, must be considered.
What exactly will it do for Detroit?

Bottega Veneta Spring 2022
Lexie Moreland/WWD

Gucci, set to use gritty-glam Hollywood Boulevard as the backdrop for its next show on Nov. 2, announced $1 million in grants for community organizations that work on the key issues of homelessness and mental health in L.A.
Bottega Veneta did not make any similar dollar pledge, but Lee and his team tapped several community collaborators for their pop-up shop at a historic firehouse-turned design consultancy in the trendy Corktown neighborhood, which will soon get its first boutique hotel.
Open through Jan. 16., the store features Bottega mini Jodies, cassette bags, roller skates and parakeet green woven puffer vests alongside curated art, ceramics, music and books from Underground Music Academy, which provides support and education for electronic musicians, and Asmaa Walton, founder of the Black Art Library, among others.
The brand also organized a sightseeing media tour of the city, touching on architecture, design and sound, with stops at the art-stuffed modernist Hawkins Ferry House in Grosse Pointe that’s owned by a gallerist/real estate developer couple; the Techno Museum (a.k.a. the home of Submerge Records) near historic Milwaukee Junction, and the Hamtramck art studio of Chris Schanck, who makes sculptures from foam, tinted resin and automotive finishing paint for high-end collectors and museums.

Burna Boy and Daniel Lee
Lexie Moreland/WWD

“He took the time to come in and was curious, it made me feel comfortable. I’m glad they are here,” Schanck said of Lee and Bottega.
Detroit, like many cities, is grappling with gentrification, and its abundance of abandoned buildings and homes are reminders of a city still in crisis even as the creative class grows and expensive condo developments rise. Then again, the widening gulf between haves and have nots is hardly a unique American story.

Gypsy Sport RTW Spring 2022

Gypsy Sport RTW Spring 2022

When Gypsy Sport designer Rio Uribe moved from New York back to his hometown Los Angeles in 2019, he never dreamed it would take two years to get back to showing on the runway.“I spent 15 years in New York and came back to spend time with family and reconnect with my roots. But I definitely was not expecting a pandemic,” said the designer, a 2015 CFDA Vogue Fashion Fund winner. “We had this show scheduled for March 2019.”
Two years later, Uribe presented his spring 2022 collection in L.A. at long last on Sunday night, at the Petersen Automotive Museum that helped inspire it.

True to Gypsy Sport form, the show blasted any preconceived notions of gender and sexuality with a cast representing the range of diversity within the Latine community.
In this season of reflection on American style, Uribe’s spirited lineup of glam streetwear celebrated Chicano culture’s contributions, with baggy satin pants and bum-revealing lowrider denim; doily lace-trimmed sports jerseys and oversize sequin hoodies; polka dot pinup dresses, and Pachuco style suits — all worn with tricked-out Nike sneakers.

“I thought this was a great chance for me to focus on my Hispanic heritage. I’m a Chicano and the casting and collection are inspired by that,” said Uribe, whose deconstructed American flag pole dancer look is part of the “In America: A Lexicon of Fashion” exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
But this collection was all L.A., starting with the inspiration: the famous Gypsy Rose lowrider car Uribe first saw at the Petersen in 2018. The pink-and-chrome beauty created by Jesse Valdez has been called the Mona Lisa of the custom car culture that grew out of Southern California. The 1964 Chevy Impala also gained fame in the opening credits of ’70s TV series “Chico and the Man.”
The car’s rose painted details made their way onto a fun vinyl bubble cape, while airbrushed hearts added whimsy to a sweetheart pink tweed jacket and zip-front miniskirt suit. Uribe introduced several lowrider bomber jackets, which looked cool, as did a button-down shirt and boxer shorts in a Virgin Mary print.
Uribe will release a capsule collection with the Petersen Museum, following one he’s doing with the Met. “I’ve learned that museum shops are my outlet, whereas department stores might not take a chance on me. People attending museums are more avant-garde and more interested in artistic pieces,” he said.
Working now in L.A., Uribe follows in the footsteps of another trailblazing designer: Mexican American Louis Verdad. “I looked up to him,” Uribe said. “There could be a lot more of us. There is so much talent here and there are not enough Chicano and Mexican American people in fashion in general. I’m going to try to change that.”

Chanel RTW Spring 2022

Chanel RTW Spring 2022

It was flashback time for photographers at the Chanel show, which was staged in a replica of the Carrousel du Louvre, the cavernous venue that hosted many Paris Fashion Week shows in the 1980s and 1990s.Snappers were grouped around a raised runway for a high-energy show that brought to mind late creative director Karl Lagerfeld’s supermodel extravaganzas in the ’90s. Models flipped their hair, jutted their hips and winked as they paraded in graphic swimsuits, logo-patterned dresses and tweed suits in a throwback palette of lilac, pink and yellow.

While some had a field day with the brief, others were visibly less comfortable vamping it up. The prize for Most Winning Smile went to Jill Kortleve, while Mariam de Vinzelle won for Most Dramatic Hair Toss, and Louise de Chevigny for Best Use of an Accessory, for her deft way with a chiffon stole.

With the Grand Palais undergoing renovations, Chanel switched to a temporary replacement venue near the Eiffel Tower for its first runway show with an audience in 12 months. The dark, cramped setting afforded less of a stage for peacocking Chanel clients, but gave creative director Virginie Viard an excuse to play with the show format.

Since succeeding Lagerfeld following his death in 2019, she has brought in a variety of big names to shoot the brand’s campaigns and press kits, which Lagerfeld personally lensed for more than three decades. “I’ve never taken pictures, but it’s something that fascinates me,” Viard said in a preview. “It magnifies the collection.”
The show decor, dominated by a giant image of model Vivienne Rohner holding a camera, was a tribute to those image-makers, including Inez Van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin, who were positioned at the end of the podium to record the action for Chanel’s digital broadcast later in the day.
Guests entered through a room where giant screens showed black-and-white footage of brand ambassadors, including Lily-Rose Depp and Blackpink’s Jennie, picking up cameras and preening in a director’s chair. Inside, photographers jostled to get a picture of the stars in person.
Rohner was first on the runway, in a low-cut white swimsuit and black T-shirt that were a perfect foil for the accessories: two-tone flats, a black 2.55 handbag, an oversize quilted tote and oodles of necklaces, in the kind of pileup that Lagerfeld made a trademark of ‘90s Chanel.
Some looks appeared teleported from that era: a cropped T-shirt with “Chanel” spelled out in sequins was paired with a long black skirt with a thong peeking over the waistband, while a pink cardigan came with a matching crop top and shorts. Handbags shaped like bottles of No. 5 perfume, which celebrates its centenary this year, are sure to generate waiting lists.
Viard offered oversized jackets in a variety of hues, including a lilac version printed with double-C logos. Miniskirts featured extended flaps in the back, while a black leather quilted dungaree had the aura of an instant classic.
Flou tends to be Viard’s weak point, and this show was no exception, with a closing sequence of chiffon dresses in an oversized butterfly print that felt like a downer, compared to the rest of the colorful lineup.
Viard took a risk by transporting her audience back to a golden period for Chanel, running the danger of being unfavorably compared with her predecessor. While the media-shy designer will never match Lagerfeld’s bombastic presence, this was a customer-friendly outing that should keep the brand’s cash registers ringing.
SEE ALSO: 
Blackpink’s Jennie, Kristen Stewart Snap Selfies at Chanel
Chanel Sets Its Factory 5 in Motion
Marion Cotillard Fêtes Chanel No.5 High Jewelry Collection at PFW

Balenciaga RTW Spring 2022

Balenciaga RTW Spring 2022

A brilliant commentary on celebrity worship, popular culture, inclusivity — and where fashion fits into all of that — the Balenciaga show came in the guise of a film premiere and all the red-carpet shenanigans around such events, climaxing with a bespoke episode of “The Simpsons.”It was riotously fun, blurring the lines between fashion and entertainment; thawing the icy, impassive image of the Balenciaga brand, and further solidifying Demna Gvasalia’s position as one of the industry’s most original and unpredictable thinkers.

A giant, red photo-call set in front of the Théâtre du Châtelet had all the trappings of awards season in Hollywood: howling photographers, efficient handlers, and a steady stream of attention-seeking guests. All of this was broadcast inside the venue on a giant screen as if it were Oscar night.

The normally stern Cathy Horyn, in a mannish wool coat, hammed it up in front of the wall of cameras even better than Susie Bubble, sending her colleagues inside into hysterics. More editors, street-style stars, VIP clients and assorted cool characters arrived in their fashion-week finest.

Interspersed was the summer 2022 collection, worn by glowering models, members of Gvasalia’s design team, and famous members of the brand tribe, from artist Eliza Douglas and racing driver Lewis Hamilton to actors Elliot Page and Isabelle Huppert. Numbers popped up on the giant screen to indicate the look numbers, though cheers from Balenciaga employees, seated in the upper balconies of the gilded theater, were an extra clue.
By the time Cardi B arrived, her face partly obscured by a bowl-shaped Philip Treacy hat from the Balenciaga Couture runway and a trenchcoat printed with a collage of celebrity magazines, it felt like Gvasalia couldn’t top the moment.

But then those telltale clouds appeared on the screen, clearing to reveal the Simpsons household, and the audience roared with delight.
If we are indeed entering an “attention economy,” Balenciaga is sure to grab 10 minutes on YouTube from virtually anyone with a passing interest in fashion — and the zillions of people, including children, who adore that quirky cartoon family.
The episode depicts Homer Simpson struggling to pronounce the French fashion brand (“Balun, Balloon, Baleen”); Marge strolling through Springfield in a sharp-shouldered gown, and the whole town flown to Paris for fashion week to model looks from recent Balenciaga collections.

No shortage of product placements here: Sideshow Bob shoving his giant feet into sleek Balenciaga sock sneakers; the grouchy bartender Moe resplendent in a fridge-sized camel coat, and Lisa Simpson sashaying in a red, fishtail gown. “Walk a runway? It’s so superficial. Ugh, just this once. For research,” the girl sniffs, only to exclaim “Whee!” once she hits the spotlights.
When the laughter dies down, people can turn their attention to Gvasalia’s terrific new collection, which had a dressier bent — given the red-carpet theme and his recent foray into haute couture — across the spectrum of his fetish garments, from T-shirts and hoodies to loose dresses and tight catsuits with built-in heels.
The designer’s insistence on oversize shapes, with a dollop of dystopian gloom and a dash of underground edginess, has now made Balenciaga identifiable by the huge, elegantly sagging silhouettes; the blown-out jeans and deliberately tattered knits; the squarish shoes, now sculpted in rubber-like EVA, or bulbous sneakers and Crocs. He reined in obvious branding to big double-B logos on trapezoid-shaped handbags and chunky crystal earrings.
Gvasalia was the last to appear on the red carpet, reprising his Met gala look of a black hoodie, gloves and face covering, wagging a finger at the paparazzi who begged for more.
In a telephone chat before the show, Gvasalia said he wanted “something to make you smile,” and it was hard not to, watching Bart lower his Balenciaga shorts to moon the front row — only to have five men drop their trousers with the retort: “You think we are offended? This is France!”

Alexandre Blanc RTW Spring 2022

Alexandre Blanc RTW Spring 2022

A new addition to the official Paris schedule, with a presentation and a presence at the Sphere showroom, Alexandre Blanc took his inspiration from Italian high society, drawing from his Latin heritage. His prints — based on the designer’s own artworks — were informed by the architectural details of the Villa Farnese near Rome, with geometric patterns that were new to his vocabulary.
The look: Alexandre Blanc’s signature open necklines and fitted, slit-fronted dresses with their vintage charm, in the distinct colorways he carries over from season to season, were joined by new silhouettes like a draped bustier dress, a tunic and a silk pajama ensemble.

Quote of note: “The idea was to reinforce my signature, with very pictorial prints. I never normally do graphic patterns, but you can still see the brushstrokes, which is important to my aesthetic.”
Key pieces: An open-necked jacket in an ecru cotton, linen and silk blend, cinched at the waist and adorned with gold buttons; a bustier dress in a vivid animal print with a paper-bag waist; a dress with a jersey top and fluid skirt, a more casual take on Blanc’s look. For the second time, the designer collaborated with Goossens on extravagant jewelry pieces.

Takeaway: Adding bright colors and irreverent touches of bling gave Alexandre Blanc’s collection for spring a stronger signature, and the broader range of silhouettes worked like a charm.

Dior RTW Spring 2022

Dior RTW Spring 2022

The world’s a stage, and each must play a part — so said Elvis Presley, and Maria Grazia Chiuri.For the first major show of Paris Fashion Week, the Dior women’s wear designer transformed a tent in the Tuileries gardens into a ‘60s-era nightclub, with a multilevel circular stage where a live band played Italian disco music, and models stood until it was their turn to walk.
It turns out the audience was part of the concept, too. “Fashion is a performance, where the performers are not only the models, but also the people that participate in the show,” Chiuri explained in a preview. “I feel like it’s a new debut in a way, where you are again on stage.”

Marc Bohan’s ‘60s-era designs for the house, currently on display as part of a Dior retrospective at the Brooklyn Museum, inspired the look of the collection, which channeled a youthquake spirit with colorful A-line dresses, trapeze coats and miniskirts, paired with white gogo boots or patent leather mary janes.

Chiuri has spent the last 18 months pondering the role of the fashion industry, under fire for fueling overconsumption at a time when climate change is causing widespread natural disasters. She’s worked to introduce more sustainable fabrics into her collections, but has also been feeling the urge to bring back joy after months of lonely lockdowns.

“We have to recognize the fact that humanity needs clothes, because it’s a way to perform in the world,” she said.
That was especially the case at the Piper nightclub in Rome in the ‘60s, a hotbed for the avant-garde where artists, socialites and actors converged to dance their way into a bright new future. Among them was Anna Paparatti, who designed the set for the Dior show based on her 1964 painting “The Game of Nonsense.”
Chiuri’s designs were in perfect synch with the setting. There were skimpy skirt suits in citrus shades; color-blocked dresses and coat; stiff bandeau tops and skirts with oversize prints of exotic animals, borrowed from the house’s signature Toile de Jouy and blown up to abstract proportions; and crystal-fringed dresses that begged for a glitter ball backdrop.
She was particularly inspired by Bohan’s Slim Look collection, presented in 1961 — a departure from founder Christian Dior’s hourglass Bar jacket. “I was obsessed with the idea of showing how many different jacket silhouettes are in the history of Dior, so I did very different shapes, because I don’t just want to speak about the Bar jacket,” she explained.

Dior RTW Spring 2022
Delphine Achard/WWD

Chiuri has a strong sense of the house’s heritage, but she’s also grounded in the present, and she knows that many young women are no longer wearing tailored jackets at all.
Expanding on the sportswear elements she introduced with her cruise collection, she balanced the retro looks with items such as satiny boxing robes and shorts in jewel tones; cannage-patterned quilted puffer jackets; printed army surplus jackets and cargo pants, and mini versions of the new Dior Vibe gym bag, the first of which will hit stores in November.
Ultimately, Chiuri wants the wearer to express themselves — whether that means donning a pair of thick-soled boots, or a dainty cape-backed minidress. The industry still hasn’t figured out how to balance the human need for creativity with its responsibility towards the planet, she recognized.
“Like all games, there are some aspects that are serious, and some aspects that are fun,” Chiuri mused. This season, at least, her girls just want to have fun.
SEE ALSO:
Dior Channels Olympic Spirit for Cruise Show in Greece
Christian Dior Brooklyn Museum Exhibition Touts New York Influence
Dior Lady Art Handbag Show Heads to China

Victoria/Tomas RTW Spring 2022

Victoria/Tomas RTW Spring 2022

In a joyful mix of genres, Victoria Feldman and Tomas Berzins set their coed collection against the backdrop of a giant inflatable pyramid by Cyril Lancelin in the courtyard of La Caserne, a new eco-incubator for fashion and luxury in the 10th arrondissement. The installation was echoed on the runway, and Edward Crutchley’s art featured in prints and on quirky leather accessories, while a performance by buzzy French musician Lewis OfMan set the eclectic tone.
The look: Now in their third season and offering only fully reversible designs, the design duo returned to the runway with a confident strut, offering a colorful explosion of two-tone neon tailoring with long fringe details that swayed. While the brighter designs took the limelight, it was with a more neutral palette mixing utilitarian and streetwear influences that their plays on versatility were most skillful.

 Quote of note: “It’s sexy but still masculine,” summed up Berzins.
Key pieces: The voluminous trenchcoats, mirroring the walls of the venue in shades of gray and beige, were overlaid with pleated, embroidered tulle on the reverse, adding a touch of romanticism. Their open shoulders added further versatility, as they were able to be worn sleeveless or cinched at the waist as a dress. Vivid appliqué shirtdresses with pointy 1970s-style collars and leather cross-body bags painted with the graduations of a sunset were among further standouts.

Takeaway: The sun beamed into the courtyard, a stroke of luck for Feldman and Berzins, as rain is forecast for much of the week. “We didn’t have a plan B,” said Feldman backstage before the show. Their sunny outlook paid off, and shone through in this upbeat offering.

Chiara Boni La Petite Robe RTW Spring 2022

Chiara Boni La Petite Robe RTW Spring 2022

Celebrating her 50-year career in fashion, Chiara Boni unveiled her spring Chiara Boni La Petite Robe collection with a video, filmed at Milan’s Bagni Misteriosi venue. Featuring Anna Cleveland, along with two other models, the short movie, which had a surreal vibe, presented a range of black and white designs that echoed Helmut Newton’s signature slick style.
The look: Timeless elegance combined with modern comfort. Uncomplicated lines, flattering silhouettes and feminine details defined the collection, which spanned from everyday essentials to evening gowns injected with discreet sensuality.

Quote of note: “In this collection, we tried to find a good balance between more quotidian pieces, that were in big demand during the pandemic, and more formal and occasion designs, that are returning to be the most requested, especially in the United States,” Boni said. “People want to go out, dress up and have fun.”
Key pieces: A mannish pajama-like suit embellished with contrasting piping; maxidresses with draped details, cutouts, crisscrosses and plunging V-necks; corsets embroidered with floral motifs; polo shirts matched with relaxed shorts; leisure viscose ribbed pieces cut in essential silhouettes.

Takeaway: Loyal to her signature style, Boni continues to deliver versatile, easy-to-wear pieces for a wide range of women who can’t give up the comfort of the brand’s signature stretch jersey fabric.

Bally RTW Spring 2022

Bally RTW Spring 2022

The approach to our wardrobes has changed post-pandemic, contended chief executive officer Nicolas Girotto and “nobody wants to compromise on comfort and ease.” Accordingly, Bally presented a coed collection with a utilitarian feel, inspired by the smocks worn by artists and by workwear uniforms.
That said, the Swiss company stayed true to its traditional craftsmanship, and didn’t compromise on the quality of the Japanese denim or the hides and details.
Girotto highlighted a pair of perforated clogs that were embellished with 120 studs through a sophisticated technique that allows the artisans to produce only four pairs a day. The studs also peppered the brand’s B-Chain bag and leather pencil skirts.

A functional painter’s jacket had a triple stitching detail and a quilted leather jacket was embellished with a delicate and intricate macro B monogram. Nodding to Bally’s Swiss heritage, an Alpine floral motif was a rare pattern.
Layering was a theme, with roomy knits and leather vests worn over fluid pants.
The color palette ranged from neutrals and earthy tones — ivory, milk white and canapa — to accents of blue, poppy and red.
Accessories remain a core business for the brand, which presented an oversize tote bag made with intricately woven leather strips and a new bowling bag as well as ankle boots with mirror details.

The dual-gender theme was also explored through a selection of sneakers whose soles were made in a partnership with Vibram.
Girotto proudly said 40 percent of the collection employs sustainable materials, natural dyes and deadstock fabrics. For example, the lining of the sneakers was made of recycled plastic bottles.
Girotto likes to call Bally’s artisans “architects of leather,” treating the material as a fabric and, once again, they lived up to the name.

Marni RTW Spring 2022

Marni RTW Spring 2022

In February 2020, he put himself in the shoes of the White Rabbit guiding Alice down the hole; a year later, he was a writer dedicating poems to his loved ones. This season, Francesco Risso, barefoot and wrapped in a yellow striped blanket and flared, striped pants, took the catwalk of his Marni runway show — which was billed as an experimental multidisciplinary performance — like a sort of guru leading a community of diverse individuals.Marni invited all the guests of the event to attend a personal fitting a few days ahead of the show at the brand’s showroom to pick an outfit to wear Saturday night, when, except for a few editors and executives, the entire audience was dressed in upcycled garments hand-painted with stripes. Guests blended with some performers, seated in a circular arena made of recycled wood.

Kicking off with a live chorus, the show opened with models in all-striped outfits, including sliced-up asymmetrical dresses, oversize blazers, deconstructed chunky sweaters and bandeau tops matched with flared pants.
Suddenly, another performer took the stage reading a poem. His knit pants decorated with naif daisies anticipated the theme of the collection’s second group. Daisies blossomed on an array of items, sometimes matched with the lineup’s signature stripes. The flowers, featuring a childlike vibe that is a defining feature of Risso’s aesthetic, came as fabric applications on cotton tank dresses and baggy shorts; popped up as intarsia on adorable retro leotards layered over striped catsuits with flared pants, and were crafted in leather and assembled to create exquisite frocks and sets. Biker jackets with graphic motifs and striped fluid dresses were also included in the lineup.

As a singer took the stage, the last group of models walked the catwalk in Risso’s interpretation of eveningwear. Fringed knitted dresses with intentionally unfinished touches were embroidered with maxi sparkling daisies, which also peppered the sensual cutout satin frocks and a fabulous black and white hand-painted silk gown.
Accessorizing the look, knitted shoes were enriched with trompe-l’oeil motifs reproducing the silhouettes and the details of classic footwear styles, from sneakers to loafers, while bags came splashed with allover daisy patterns, adding commercial appeal to the quirky collection.
Closing with all the performers gathered together at the center of the arena in a festive celebration, the show again revealed Risso’s desire to express his creativity in different ways beyond the normal runway show.

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