Fall 2021

Re/Done Teams Up With The Jeans Redesign Project

Re/Done Teams Up With The Jeans Redesign Project

L.A.-based label Re/Done has teamed up with The Jeans Redesign Project to debut a capsule of responsible jeans today. Since its inception in 2014, the brand has gained a cult-like following for its vintage-inspired denim and ready-to-wear. Over the last year, the brand expanded with its first three retail locations in Malibu, on Melrose in Los Angeles and the Hamptons.

A look from Re/Done x The Jeans Redesign Project.
Courtesy Image

The Re/Done x The Jeans Redesign capsule includes three pairs of responsibly sourced 100 percent cotton classic jeans with a 1970s look. They come in boot-cut, stove pipe and ultra-high-rise wide-legged styles with vintage, light blue washes from $265 to $295 in sizes 23 to 32.

A look from Re/Done x The Jeans Redesign Project.
Courtesy Image

Each product falls within the “framework and set of guidelines launched by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation in 2019 by over 80 denim experts in an industry-wide effort to establish minimum requirements and certify durability, material health, recyclability and traceability,” the brand noted. Additionally, each piece sports a QR code on the handtag with tracing information, incorporates recycled hardware and bio-based patches, and will be packaged in recycled, oxo-biodegradable poly bags. 

A look from Re/Done x The Jeans Redesign Project.
Courtesy Image

5 Things to Know About Zuhair Murad’s Dazzling Fall 2021 Couture Collection

5 Things to Know About Zuhair Murad’s Dazzling Fall 2021 Couture Collection

Photo: Courtesy of Zuhair Murad
Lebanese designer Zuhair Murad‘s fall 2021 couture collection is an expression of unapologetic splendor. After year of lockdowns, staying indoors, and the absence of social events, the collection of evening gowns is a heartfelt tribute to cities and cultures of bravery.
Here, five things you must know about Zuhair Murad’s fall 2021 couture collection.

The collection is an ode to the designer and his hometown’s resilience
Photo: Courtesy of Zuhair Murad
Murad’s atelier, an archive worth 20 years of work, was shattered in the August 4 Beirut port explosion last year amid the pandemic weighing down the fashion industry. The collection pays a tribute to the perseverance entrenched in his country’s culture. Working on his couture line made Murad feel happy and alive, despite the hurdles 2020 brought.
The collection’s muse is the city of Venice
Photo: Courtesy of Zuhair Murad
Murad looked to the Serenissima, another city of resilience that has suffered invasions and diseases but has re-emerged every time. From “fourreau” capes borrowing from Italian artist Vittore Carpaccio’s paintings to scoop necks and puffed cap sleeves inspired by the Venetian Carnival, the collection is wrapped in historical references of the City of Doges. The embroidery takes from stained glass windows and Murano chandeliers in Venetian architecture.
The collection combines gigantic volume with thin silhouettes
Photo: Courtesy of Zuhair Murad
The gowns’ silver and gold crystal fringe, along with draped ballooning taffeta capes, juxtapose enormous proportions and slender silhouettes.
The collection’s color palette draws from tones of precious jewels
Photo: Courtesy of Zuhair Murad
Pieces further down the line had a palette of deep black offset with tones of emerald, ruby, and sapphire, and winding embroidered numbers shimmering in diamonds.
The collection revisits Renaissance outfits
Photo: Courtesy of Zuhair Murad
The combinations of crystal garlands, long dresses of patrician hostesses, and oriental princess kaftans represent Renaissance-inspired chiffon, taffeta, faille and metallic organza outfits. However, silver lurex and shoulders and curves revealed through slits and asymmetries bring a modern note.
Read Next: 5 Things to Know about Elie Saab’s Blossoming Fall 2021-22 Couture Collection

5 Things to Know About Rami Al Ali’s Unabashedly “Seductive” Fall 2021 Couture Collection

5 Things to Know About Rami Al Ali’s Unabashedly “Seductive” Fall 2021 Couture Collection

Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Syrian fashion designer Rami Al Ali’s fall/winter 2021 couture collection effortlessly marries simplicity with grandiose. Unveiled in a presentation on June 5, the 14 pieces romanticize architectural silhouettes through generously ornate embellishments. Read on for five things you must know about the collection.

The collection borrows from the simplicity of lockdown fashion
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Lockdown lifestyles have forced many designers to pivot away from their own aesthetics and toward the sort of simple, elegant clothing that feels right in the present. This collection does no different, with muted yet sophisticated tones that are easy on the eyes.
The collection takes creative cues from an award-winning photography series
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
The collection follows in the footsteps of a photo series by Swiss photographer Cyril Porchet. Named Seduction, they capture opulent altars in 10 baroque churches. The collection especially mirrors a picture of a church altar in Regensburg, Germany with incredibly detailed handwork. Baroque silhouettes reign supreme in the collection, with a touch of modernity in every piece.
The collection incorporates royal colors and shades
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
A sense of regality can be felt throughout the collection, conveyed through the Dubai-based designer’s use of champagne and beige hues, interspersed with varying degrees of gold, from bright metallics to vintage rust. As with every Al Ali couture collection, beading plays an integral role to its makeup.
The collection fuses Swarovski crystals and new materials
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Employing a dazzling blend of Swarovski crystals and pearls, the collection introduces feathers this season to create movement and provide contrast to the starkness of the gold, while maintaining the feminine codes of the house. New materials such as gilded macramé are also initiated to form a sleek, full crystal look.
The collection amalgamates diverse outfits
Photo: Courtesy of Rami Al Ali
Silhouettes vary from voluminous gowns to sleek fit-to-form varieties. Playful tea length dresses are interspersed with elegant jumpsuits, ruffled tops, and pleated muslin trousers.
Read Next: Maison Rabih Kayrouz Fall 2021 Couture Presents Les Exceptionnels

Maison Rabih Kayrouz Fall 2021 Couture Presents Les Exceptionnels

Maison Rabih Kayrouz Fall 2021 Couture Presents Les Exceptionnels

Photo: Courtesy of Maison Rabih Kayrouz
Rabih Kayrouz may be reeling as he watches and experiences the devastation of the economic collapse of his home country Lebanon, and yet he continues to push forth, a beacon of light, and a purveyor of beauty. The words of the great Syrian poet Adonis come to mind, “Beauty can save the world.”
Photo: Courtesy of Maison Rabih Kayrouz
This season, the Maison Rabih Kayrouz Fall 2021 couture collection saw its “Les Essentiels” collection transform through haute couture to become “Les Exceptionnels.” A fine wool jacket is transformed into a tuxedo with an open back. A double gabardine trench coat is embroidered and its fabric unravels into fringes underlining the cotton gauze of a dress in silk tulle. Meanwhile, a cashmere coat is accented with velvet bangs, accenting movement, and pushing forth with joy. Kayrouz comments that all is intertwined, intended to be treasured and passed on from one woman to another.
Photo: Courtesy of Maison Rabih Kayrouz
Where does one go, when the outside world no longer exists? Kayrouz was badly injured during the August 4th Beirut blast. Walking up the steep staircase to his showroom in Paris one comes face to face with the framed picture of the Rocks of Raouché. The familiar rock formations now appear like a broken heart. And then, light. The atelier is as it has always been, bathed in sunshine and lined with block-color clothes standing at attention, in silent competition; which one will slide first into the wardrobe? At the room’s center is Kayrouz. Exceptionally slim, his broad shoulders seem straighter; his face, while almost entirely covered with a surgical mask, has taken on the paradoxical deep and empty expression of someone who has witnessed war.
Photo: Courtesy of Maison Rabih Kayrouz
“Twenty years of work is not nothing. I have a certain experience,” starts Kayrouz, adding that he has an archive of 2000 patterns. “When I celebrated this milestone, in 2019, I took a step back to reflect and concentrate. And then the world sent some signs…” Kayrouz no longer wants to run, where the speed results in the forgetting of things that happen. He affirms that this realization occurred just before Covid. This desire to slow down the rhythm. “I was starting to feel tired, but you know, when you are in fashion, we have a calendar to follow and we don’t have the luxury to think a great deal.”
Photo: Courtesy of Maison Rabih Kayrouz
Yet, think differently, he did. He found strength in his desire to shift to act. Now, instead of churning out something new at all costs, he is focusing on his savoir-faire. “My obsession has always been to dress the woman I love in a full wardrobe. I present couture in my way. Contemporary couture.”
Photo: Courtesy of Maison Rabih Kayrouz
Read Next: “To Have and to Hold” Dior Fall 2021 Couture Beckons to Be Touched

With Valentino in Venice and an Alaïa Debut, IRL Couture Shows are Back

With Valentino in Venice and an Alaïa Debut, IRL Couture Shows are Back

Photo: Courtesy of Valentino
While the spring 2022 menswear shows in Milan and Paris are expected to be a hybrid of in-person and virtual, the Couture shows, organized by Paris’s Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture et de la Mode, will be a mostly physical affair. If real life collections from Christian Dior and Chanel were not enough to get your heart racing—alongside the twice-postponed debuts from Demna Gvasalia at Balenciaga and Chitose Abe at Jean Paul Gaultier—there is even more happening around the collections.
On July 15, several days after the official week concludes, Valentino creative director Pierpaolo Piccioli will be taking his couture show on the road to Venice. “Venice for Pierpaolo represents the city that generates vibrations on art, music, architecture, cinema, and everything that has to do with creativity,” said the brand in a statement. Valentino’s fall 2021 haute couture show in the Floating City won’t be the only fashion event requiring a vaporetto: Rick Owens is expected to present his menswear collection there in June, WWD is reporting that Saint Laurent will host a menswear show there in July, and there are rumors that more brands are planning one-off events in Venice in August.
For those staying in Paris, there will be plenty to take in before the official Couture week kicks off too. On July 4, Pieter Mulier will show his first official collection as the artistic director of Alaïa. It will mark the brand’s first runway show since its founder Azzedine Alaïa’s death in 2017 and Mulier’s first outing at the helm of a brand. Previously, he was Raf Simons’s right hand for the better part of a decade, following his fellow Belgian designer from Jil Sander to Christian Dior and Calvin Klein.
In addition, the Couture calendar will welcome guest designers Kerby Jean-Raymond of Pyer Moss, Charles de Vilmorin, and Ralph Rucci of RR331.
Read Next: Celebrating Enduring Couture That Continues to Thrive in an Era Rocked By a Pandemic
Originally published on Vogue.com

Weekend Max Mara Teams Up With Supermodel for Latest Capsule

Weekend Max Mara Teams Up With Supermodel for Latest Capsule

MILAN — Alek Wek is the latest personality to team up with Weekend Max Mara on a Signature capsule collection.
The Sudanese supermodel and United Nations’ Good Will Ambassador teamed up with the brand’s in-house creative team to deliver “A.W.orld by Alek Wek,” a joyful and colorful capsule offering a range of urban staples.
Mixing “African culture with a London calling vibe and a touch of Boho,” as she said, Wek combined references from her origins with the needs for versatility required by an international lifestyle. The highly approachable pieces can be easily mixed and matched, helping women transition their style from day to night.
Striped ribbed knitted styles, spanning from tops to dresses, steal the spotlight in the collection with their color palette inspired by the South Sudanese flag. Dressier styles include overcoats, trenches and a shearling vest, all to be layered on draped dresses showing precious trimmings. While high-waisted flared jeans add a casual touch, a dramatic black velvet coat introduces a chic, evening twist to the capsule.

In this collaboration, Wek’s artistic eye is reflected through printed silk frocks and scarves with graphics borrowed from some of her artwork.
The collection is completed by a range of accessories, including Weekend Max Mara’s Pasticcino Bag featuring a detachable embroidered strap, a felt fedora, riding boots and a thick belt with crisscross laces.

“Working with Weekend Max Mara’s creative team has been an emotional journey. It all started last fall. I shared my ideas, my inspirations and especially my artworks with the team. It was amazing to see how they have transformed these ideas in such a good way, giving life to this collection,” said Wek. “They had the right sensibility to transform my artworks in such a wonderful way. It is incredible how beautifully they have put them into this collection.”

Alek Wek wearing an outfit of the fall 2021 Signature capsule she designed for Weekend Max Mara. 
Courtesy of Weekend Max Mara

Wek is one of the most iconic models in the global fashion industry. Born in Sudan, she left her native country in 1983 during the civil war and moved to London, where she studied fashion business at the London College of Fashion.
She was discovered at an outdoor market in 1995 in London, the same year she appeared in Tina Turner’s “Golden Eye” music video, and a year later she was signed to Ford Models. In 1997, Wek became the first African model to appear on the cover of Elle.
Based in New York, in the past Wek also experimented with accessories design, launching the “Wek 1933” bag line, which was inspired by the brass-clasp briefcase carried by her father. The line is now discontinued. She has also appeared in several movies, including “The Four Feathers” in 2002 and most recently in Luca Guadagnino’s remake of “Suspiria” in 2018.
Wek is the latest personality to collaborate with Weekend Max Mara, which previously unveiled capsules developed with American illustrator and pop artist Donald Robertson; Lucinda Chambers, former fashion director of British Vogue; Oscar-winning costume designer Gabriella Pescucci; American interior designer Anthony Baratta, and American artist Richard Saja inspired by the historical Royal Ascot races, among others.

See also: 
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Why Are Fashion Designers So Drawn to Rave Culture?

Why Are Fashion Designers So Drawn to Rave Culture?

MILAN — Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons asked electronic music mogul Richie Hawtin, aka Plastikman, to create the soundtracks for the Prada brand’s men’s and women’s fall shows. In particular, in the digital video presenting the women’s collection, models were captured dancing in a dark, techno club-inspired scenario.
MSGM creative director Massimo Giorgetti staged a rave party under the snow for his men’s fall unveiling; Matthew Williams re-created the atmosphere of a techno concert for Givenchy’s digital presentation, and GCDS presented a club-ready lineup with a trippy mood. Meanwhile, in Paris, Coperni brought its guests to the AccorHotels Arena to assist with a parade of club gear featuring techno music as a soundtrack, while newly appointed artistic director Nicolas Di Felice celebrated club culture with his fall collection for Courrèges.

These are just a few examples of the significant, ongoing influence of rave and clubbing culture in the collections presented by a range of fashion houses a year after the breakout of the COVID-19 pandemic, which shook the world, imposed restrictions on individual freedom and asked people to rethink their personal and professional lifestyles.
Escapism had already emerged as a theme in the spring 2021 collections presented last fall as the pandemic raged on. However, if then it was expressed more as sweet nostalgia and the desire for reassurance, a season later, escapism had a harder edge, more subversive in a way and surely more proactive.

“I think the lack of freedom has gone on longer than anyone expected and the novelty of being able to work from home, wear what you like all day and be free of the constraints of ‘the office’ have worn off. People are excited about the return of freedom, meeting others, seeing and being seen. I would expect there to be a rush to engage with the world at large whether that’s through clothing or socially (eating, drinking, clubbing, etc.),” said Professor Carolyn Mair, behavioral psychologist, PhD, author of “The Psychology of Fashion” and founder of Psychology.fashion. “Fashion reflects the zeitgeist. Uninterrupted music and dancing with a lot of other people over a period of time enables us to lose ourselves in the moment. It takes us away from our thoughts outside the rave. It’s akin to listening to an audiobook or reading a book and loosing yourself entirely in the story. This escapism takes our attention away from everyday concerns and responsibilities to focus only on the moment.”

Ottolinger, fall 2021 
Courtesy of Ottolinger

Doris Domoszlai, fashion historian and cofounder of Fashion Forward, a New York-based fashion think tank, also believes that fashion’s new desire for escapism is strongly connected to the lack of freedom we are all experiencing.
“With the world now living through year two of the COVID-19 pandemic, I’m not surprised that many designers have turned to escapism to express their frustrations and hope for the future,” said Domoszlai. “The outdoors and rave culture make sense as venues of escape: they’re literally outside and away, and far more exciting than the closed spaces that we’ve found ourselves in for the past year.”

In particular, Domoszlai reflected on some of the digital shows presented during the fall 2021 fashion weeks.
“Givenchy presented an exciting collection in the kind of warehouse that’s an ode to both the infamous acid raves of the ’90s and also the illegal raves rule breakers have been hosting during the pandemic. The electronic music to which the show is set emphasizes the urgency to escape this dystopian reality,” said Domoszlai, who also drew a link between the GCDS digital presentation and early Aughts’ Millennium Bag and the fear of a digitalized unknown future. “Referencing the infamous scene in ‘The Matrix’ — when the main character Neo chooses to eat a red pill that exposes the cold, hard reality that he’s been blind to — a model eats a red hard candy and literally exposes viewers to a collection that represents the current pandemic-plagued reality that we are living through. Taking place in various outdoor scenes, the GCDS collection is an escape to both the future as it was seen in the past, as well as to all the potential places we can go to get away from our long-term quarantine.”
In addition, Domoszlai spotlighted the digital presentation of Ottolinger, which channeled escapism in an outdoor perspective.
“In their digital presentation, they transport the viewer to an unnamed, futuristic, rocky landscape. This scene, and the activewear-inspired clothing shown within it, simultaneously demonstrate the designers’ need to escape the confines of the closed spaces to which many were relegated because of COVID-19, and the feeling of being lost in uncharted territory as a result of it all,” she said. “The last few words of the soundtrack are very telling. The narrator describes the setting as ‘formerly known as somewhere, now known as nowhere,’ summarizing the disconnect the brand’s designers feel with the world today.”
An interesting fact related to how designers are interpreting escapism is the aforementioned switch from a sugar-coated type of nostalgia seen for the spring collections to the darker, more introspective and probably more rebellious vibe seen for fall.
“Nostalgia is an interesting construct. It is defined as a bittersweet emotion, yet fashion tends to think of it only as ‘sweet.’ When we look back, we do often see the past in a positive light, wishing for the return of a past when things were perceived of as better than they are now. But perception is selective and what we ‘see’ is not all there is,” Mair explained. “The idea of nostalgia triggering positive memories has come about in part through studies in which participants were asked to remember something positive in the past, but more recent studies have led to a different definition. Researchers found that when participants were given an artifact from the past, rather than when they were asked to recall a positive event form the past, it triggered a negative emotion. In sum, nostalgia, like all other psychological constructs, is more complex than it appears on the surface.”

GCDS, fall 2021 
Courtesy of GCDS

Giorgio Riello, professor of early modern global history at Florence’s European University Institute, explained that “this alternation between more nostalgic and more proactive social and cultural responses is recurrent in modern history.”
In particular, Riello pointed out how, after World War II, Christian Dior evoked 19th-century fashion with the launch of the New Look in 1947. But how only a few years later, in the early ’50s, Italian designers proposed a new, more practical and unfussy take on fashion. “I believe that the nostalgic vision is transitory, especially because it normally refers to a vision of the past that in most of the case is not real,” said Riello.
The professor also created a parallel between the global situation during the pandemic, when people are indulging in comfort clothing as they work from home and are restricted in going out, with what happened after World War I.
“Coco Chanel opened her first store in 1913 before the war and with her creations she contributed to developing a more informal and more practical idea of elegant dressing,” Riello said. “However, a few years after the end of World War I, the Roaring Twenties came and they brought a new wave of excess and eccentricity.”
It is a point made by many others, from designers to retailers to financial analysts. With the trillions of dollars pumping through the global financial system, and consumers having spent the last year mainly at home with little chance to spend on travel or restaurants, predictions are that the end of the COVID-19 pandemic will see another ‘Roaring Twenties’ over the next decade. Fashion already is reflecting that for fall, with many designers creating exuberant collections perfect for dressing up to go to a party.
Riello explained that something similar happened after the French Revolution, during the French Directory, when members of Paris’ aristocratic subculture responded to the austerity and terror of the recent past by indulging in luxury and decadence. Called the Incroyables e les Merveilleuses, these men and women welcomed the new regime with hundreds of balls where they used to wear see-through dresses inspired by the ancient Greeks and Romans or wide trousers and huge neckties, bold wigs and giant hats, as well as sandals with ribbons to wrap around the legs.
But why do these different creative responses happen? Because, according to Mair, creativity is a complex construct.
“People we consider, or who consider themselves to be, creative may react to crises and emergencies in many different ways. Nevertheless, crises and emergencies demand the ability to think quickly to produce novel solutions that work. To do this, people need to take new and diverse perspectives to join concepts in novel ways. Not everyone has a natural ability to do this, we need to move away from the idea that creativity resides in the fingertips,” she said. “Creativity is a brain process and so in order to be creative, particularly in times of crisis or emergency, we need to be alert to changes in the situation, to be problem identifiers rather than problem solvers, be able to make good decisions quickly, have good communication, teamwork and leadership skills as well as the ability to stay calm and alert simultaneously.
“To answer the question, creative minds tend to react to crisis and emergencies calmly and decisively, drawing on a range of people they know to be creative thinkers also. They tolerate ambiguity and understand that the best they can hope for in the short term is to find the optimal solution. This will not be the only solution or even the best one possible. Once the crisis or emergency has passed, they review the processes to learn from them so they don’t repeat mistakes in future.”
See also: 
5 Lessons Multibrand Showrooms Learnt During the Pandemic
What Has COVID-19 Really Been Like for the Retail Store Employee?
How Six Female Entrepreneurs Found Success During the COVID-19 Pandemic

15 of the Best Modest Looks from the Fall 2021 Season to Covet

15 of the Best Modest Looks from the Fall 2021 Season to Covet

How uplifting to witness the new Fall 2021 collections starting to filter through – they feel like a temporary jolt out of a pandemic-induced haze. And designers really have gone ‘all-out’ this season, presenting beautifully ethereal films (Dior) and cinematic shorts (Miu Miu) from the dreamy halls of the Palace of Versailles to far-flung snow-capped mountains. Lockdown has obviously inspired the desire for wanderlust and fantasy, and the fashion? Well, it’s all the better for it.
An undercurrent of protection and utility – familiar narratives for Winter offerings – is, understandably, evident once again in oversized quilted coats (Chloe), padded ski jackets (Miu Miu) and cropped shearling-trimmed bombers (Givenchy). At Dior, Maria Grazia Chiuri tucked 50s headscarves into turtleneck sweaters, topped with elegantly-cut, ankle-grazing coats – investment pieces that feel right, for now.
Going back to the aforementioned ‘jolt,’ take in Jonathan Anderson’s bold and offbeat collection for Loewe to feel the fizz of new ideas blossoming. Zig-zag prints, cocoon shapes, colorful accessories – this is outright fun and frivolous fashion that requires no justification… coming to an extravagantly staged Tim walker editorial soon. This is artwork for the body: a blue two-piece trimmed with giant tassels, draped silk tops with huge buckle-like embellishment, wide striped culottes, and fluffy psychedelic mohair sweaters – pieces that simply radiate joy.
For those going back to the office, there are plenty of suggestions for an elevated everyday wardrobe from Elie Saab, Hermes and Fendi, whose flowing silk skirts and belted tonal blouses with extra-wide cuffs combine comfort, modesty and chic wearability. Jil Sander, too, has plenty to inspire a wardrobe refresh with long leather gloves and point-toe knee boots paired with geometric dresses, topped with a neck scarf in the same print – effortless layering done really, really well.
Read Next: 5 Key Fall 2021 Fashion Trends to Know Now

5 Key Fall 2021 Fashion Trends to Know Now

5 Key Fall 2021 Fashion Trends to Know Now

What season is it anyway? Does it even matter? Despite the pandemic induced shuffle of shows, collection drops and business models, designers have retained at least one constant, unshakeable drive: the desire to create. And while we might not necessarily need to invest in a new pair of metallic fringed pants right now, just the very sight of them is enough (in some small way), to inspire a scenario of dancing in them with a room full of mask-less people. Until then, add them to a list of fall 2021 items and trends to covet (below) when the seasons once again roll around…
Loose suits

SS21’s wide pants have gained traction – so much so in fact, that designers have decided to pair them with an equally oversized jacket. Cue the loose suit, offered up by the likes of Victoria Beckham, Alberta Ferretti and Max Mara: sophisticated, elegant and utterly effortless.
Puffer jackets

Paired with maxi dresses, midi skirts, short shorts or even high-heel armored boots (Balenciaga), the protective puffer jacket is a versatile winter wardrobe staple for fall 2021.
A fringe finish

From belted coats to knit dresses, designers had everything in shreds for fall. Let’s face it, fringed clothing has come a long way from its association with 1920s flapper dresses, Western-style leather jackets, or Sixties Hippie era suede waistcoats. At Salvatore Ferragamo, monochrome knit dresses were covered in hanging scraps, while Fendi added fringe detail to the bottom of elegant evening coats.
Statement legs

A fast-track way to change up an outfit? With a pair of block color or statement print stockings. At Prada, models strutted through multi-textural rooms in geometric print hosiery rendered all the more powerful under conservative navy skirt suits.
Knit fever

What’s the first thing you think of when you think about comfort? If it’s cosy knitwear, you’re in good company as designers have imagined practically every silhouette for fall in ultra-soft fabrics.
Read Next: The Best Beauty Looks from Milan Fashion Week’s Fall 2021 Season

Tailoring Shifted From Office to Countryside at Milan Fashion Week

Tailoring Shifted From Office to Countryside at Milan Fashion Week

MILAN — What good is a power suit when office life has been put on stand-by?
As working from home took over as the pandemic spread, Italian masters of tailoring revisited silhouettes and fabrics in accordance with the changing lifestyle.
In particular, for fall they shifted their attention from bureaus to the countryside, reflecting customers’ migration from metropolitan cities to smaller towns. Tuning into the natural environment and relaxed, outdoor activities squeezed in between Zoom calls, brands updated their sartorial offering with looser fits, generous volumes, functional details and elements conveying an unfinished, rustic feel.
A specialist in the category, Milanese luxury label Blazè Milano made an example with its collection — intended to provide sartorial solutions from day to night.

As sported by Dree Hemingway, who starred in the video depicting a day in the Roman countryside, checkered double-breasted jackets were cut in cropped shapes, while felt wool options were charmingly revisited with the addition of drawstrings at the waist, evoking riding jackets with their shape. Tartan and gingham motifs, herringbone tweeds and Prince of Wales patterns added to the country-chic vibe of the range, which was rendered mainly in green, gray, brown and mustard colors, as well as in eccentric, 1970s-inspired prints.

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Blazé Milano fall 2021 collection.  Courtesy of Blazé Milano

Conversely, Kiton’s take on the theme came via monochrome separates crafted from cashmere, leather, suede and corduroy. Exuding a luxe feel — especially in their combination of taupe, beige and olive green shades — ankle-length double cashmere coats and leather blazers looked effortless with their minimal silhouettes and oversize fits, while functionality was enhanced in a taupe Safari jacket paired with matching culotte pants.
Kiton fall 2021 collection.  Courtesy of Kiton

Practicality also informed the Eleventy range, which looked to the British countryside for inspiration. Here, suits were revisited with a utilitarian twist: blazer jackets clutched with belts at the waist were styled with cargo pants with bias pockets, which were crafted in mannish sartorial fabrics, and tucked into Chelsea boots.
Eleventy fall 2021 collection.  Courtesy of Eleventy

An expert in tailoring, Daniele Calcaterra referenced the ’80s and its oversize volumes but with a gentler hand rounding the shoulder lines and elongating the silhouettes. The generous use of fabric resulted in cocooning shapes and was further enhanced in the layering of vests, blazer jackets and coats, all crafted from the same fabric.
Vests in particular played a big role and often replaced blazer jackets, considered more versatile and allowing for more movement. They were seen both under other garments as well as separates retooled in maxi proportions and thrown over chunky knitwear.
Calcaterra fall 2021 collection.  Elodie Cavallaro/Courtesy of Calcaterra

In addition, treatments on textiles and unfinished details added raw accents to Calcaterra’s tailoring. Cue a beautiful, hand-stitched cashmere jacket that underwent treatments generally used for Shetland wool to get a textured, prickly touch and outlined by raw cut trims.
Organic textures also informed the crafty collection of Gabriele Colangelo, who integrated drop-shoulder jackets and coats to be worn with culottes in his precise tailoring. He elevated the looks with embellishments evoking natural elements, including soutache-embroidered scalloped panels donning a raffia-like feel.

His natural references continued in his impeccable work for Giada, where Colangelo serves as creative director. Respecting the brand’s signature rigor and purity of lines, he delivered tactility, corrugating the textures of precious fabrics, and developed abstract prints nodding to trees trunks. He employed sable, yagir cashmere and curly double bouclé wool in crafting blazer jackets, coats and especially adjustable capes, which stole the spotlight with their luxe feeling.
Giada fall 2021 collection.  Courtesy of Giada

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