Emporio Armani

The 35 Best Modest Looks from Milan Fashion Week Fall/Winter 2022

The 35 Best Modest Looks from Milan Fashion Week Fall/Winter 2022

Milan Fashion Week came back strong after two years in the deep due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Making bold choices, participating designers played with the fall and winter season colors of black, brown, white, beige, blue, and silver/grey, creating an almost dark/light academia aesthetic. Standing out were Roberto Cavalli’s striking leopard patterns with draping suit jackets and majestic cape dresses, while Dolce & Gabbana made statements with headscarves paired with demure silhouettes in monochrome palettes. Versace embraced a similar mood, but with form-fitting shapes, and Jil Sander took on a more formal approach and offered a modest suit in yellow and a grey dress paired with white leather gloves.
Below, check out the 35 best modest looks spotted on the runways of Milan Fashion Week.
Dolce & Gabbana. Photo: Courtesy of Fillippo Fior
Gucci. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Roberto Cavalli. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Versace. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Max Mara. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Roberto Cavalli. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Alberta Ferretti. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Versace. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Max Mara. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Roberto Cavalli. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Prada. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Alberta Ferretti. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Loro Piana. Photo: Courtesy of Loro Piana
Versace. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Dolce & Gabbana. Photo: Courtesy of Fillipo Fior
Moschino. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Emporio Armani. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Max Mara. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Dolce & Gabbana. Photo: Courtesy of Fillippo Fior
Fendi. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Giorgio Armani. Photo: Courtesy of Fillippo Fior
Bottega Veneta. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Versace. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Fendi. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Etro. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Versace. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Jil Sander. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Gucci. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Prada. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Jil Sander. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Versace. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Gucci. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Bottega. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Emporio Armani. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Giorgio Armani. Photo: Courtesy of Fillippo Fior
Read Next: The 27 Best Modest Looks from London Fashion Week Fall 2022 Ready-to-Wear

C.P. Company Draws the Curtain on 50th Anniversary With Emporio Armani Collab

C.P. Company Draws the Curtain on 50th Anniversary With Emporio Armani Collab

MILAN — How do you mark a milestone in 2021 if not with a flurry of collaborations?That was the strategy of C.P. Company for its 50th anniversary celebrations, which are closing with a bang: A capsule collection in collaboration with Emporio Armani.
The pandemic has certainly scuppered some of the plans for IRL events and parties but the team at the Italian sportswear company known for its street cred didn’t hold back.
There are plenty of achievements to be remembered for a firm that pioneered the garment-dyeing technique in the ’70s and is credited with having defined the notion of Italian sportswear — filled with military and utilitarian references — as we know it today.

Over five decades C.P. Company has attracted international youth subcultures, become recognizable for its “goggle jacket” introduced in 1988 and has most recently entered a new phase of its development strategy under Chinese owner Tristate Holdings Ltd. and with the appointment of Lorenzo Osti, the son of the brand’s founder Massimo, as president in 2019.

Related Galleries

The C.P. Company x Emporio Armani collection.
Quentin De Briey/Courtesy of C.P. Company

Throughout 2021, C.P. Company released almost monthly drops of new cobranded or special merchandise, including a collaboration with streetwear brand Patta; a limited-edition run of statues of a British sailor with crossed arms, the brand’s logo; a windbreaker and boat shoes set in partnership with footwear firm Sebago, also popular in the ’80s, as well as tie-ups with Barbour and Adidas Spezial, among others.
Additionally, the brand issued a book titled “C.P. Company 971–021. An informal history of Italian sportswear” published by Idea and centered on personal anecdotes of 50 personalities linked to the brand.
The 10th and final tie-up with Emporio Armani pays homage to both brands’ ethos and is made up of 20 pieces developed using dedicated fabrics, in nods to Massimo Osti’s textile-driven approach to outerwear, and includes field and bomber jackets, trench coats, as well as goggle hoodies and sweaters with chest pockets, all done in blue and white.
This year also marks Emporio Armani’s 40th anniversary, which designer Giorgio Armani celebrated with a coed spring show at the Armani/Teatro, the exhibition “The Way We Are” at the Armani/Silos and the release of a special issue of the Emporio Armani Magazine.
The capsule debuts on Saturday at the Armani store on Milan’s Via Manzoni and at C.P. Company’s flagship on Corso Matteotti, before an online release planned for Dec. 13 at both brands’ e-shops.

The C.P. Company x Emporio Armani collection.
Quentin De Briey/Courtesy of C.P. Company

Founded in 1971 by Osti, the brand was originally known as Chester Perry and made a name for itself by releasing screen-printed T-shirts. In the wake of lawsuits filed by Chester Barry and Fred Perry, both claiming Osti had unlawfully used their name and surname, respectively, the brand’s name was changed into C.P. Company in 1978, simultaneously opening the way for a more experimental design approach and focus on outerwear.

Giorgio Armani to Celebrities: ‘No More Creations Worn Only Once’

Giorgio Armani to Celebrities: ‘No More Creations Worn Only Once’

Giorgio Armani lent his powerful voice to the slower-fashion movement earlier this year, penning an open letter to WWD calling for action on “the overproduction of garments and a criminal nonalignment between the weather and the commercial season.
“The decline of the fashion system as we know it began when the luxury segment adopted the operating methods of fast fashion, mimicking the latter’s endless delivery cycle in the hope of selling more, yet forgetting that luxury takes time, to be achieved and to be appreciated,” he wrote.
Here, Armani gives an update on his efforts — which stretch to celebrities on the red carpet — and urges further vigilance to bring fashion to a higher social and environmental awareness:

WWD: You vowed to keep summer collections in stores until the beginning of September. How did your customers respond?
Giorgio Armani: The reaction has been very positive, in Europe as in America and, unexpectedly, also in Asia. It must be said that the situation is still developing: Recently we have witnessed a second wave of closures that makes it very difficult to evaluate the result of our actions. But the results at the end of the summer, and then in September and October, were encouraging. I have received a great deal of letters and messages with positive feedback, and the store managers have confirmed this to me.

Related Gallery

WWD: What other steps are you taking for the fall season and beyond to help slow down fashion, reduce waste and restore value to designer fashions? And why?
G.A.: This is a theme that I am passionate about and committed to for a long time, and not only in the current, very problematic climate. It is mainly a matter of respect: for customers who should not be misled, for the planet that should not be destroyed, and for my own work, which should not be performed in a foolish way, taking away value from everything because of excess production and communication.
The main steps are the reduction of the range in all the lines, with the merging of pre-collection and fashion shows, for example, and the linking of the men’s and women’s collections in the show. Then there is a decisive movement toward sustainability, which is already very evident in Emporio with the R-EA concept collection, and in AX, which is 40 percent sustainable. The search for sustainable materials naturally also concerns the Armani Casa collections, because it must be a circular effort, a continuous giving and receiving across the entire spectrum of the Armani world.
It is the same circularity that led me to reconvert our production facilities at the time of our country’s greatest need, or to offer support through donations to local charities: a precise choice, which this year replaces, for example, the sending of substantial gifts. I preferred, instead, to offer hot meals to the needy, because what we are experiencing has created major and widespread poverty, which does not leave me unmoved.
And in the circularity of thought, with a view to doing less and better, I also involve celebrities and red-carpet events: no more creations worn only once, with an enormous waste of skills and resources. I welcome the clothes that are worn many times, and a new conscience. Just as it happened a few evenings ago for the opening night of La Scala in Milan, when numerous artists performed in clothes that were previously worn, but no less impressive. By means of all these coordinated actions, I think it is possible to reestablish value in the work of us designers, making it tangible and ethical, instead of merely frivolous, without ever relinquishing beauty.

WWD: How would you grade the overall industry in terms of slowing down and correcting product cycles and fixing the markdown problem?
G.A.: Unfortunately, I have to say that, after an initial period of widespread good intentions, part of the system seems to be tempted to quickly return to its starting point, not least for the desire to maintain media visibility through an intense rhythm of activities and new proposals. So the long-awaited slowdown doesn’t seem to be coming true for everyone: several collections keep coming out, at a rapid pace.
There has been a generalized lengthening of the life cycle of the collections in stores, also to make up for the losses during the hardest times, and generally this will lead to a less foolish markdown policy. In my opinion, more should be done, starting with design and production. We must abandon our pattern of irresponsible thinking, and adopt a higher social and environmental awareness, because luxury is not fast fashion, not to mention that even fast fashion seems to have reached the end of its useful life.
See Also:
Will the Flood of Collections Yield to Slower Fashion?
Saks Fifth Avenue Presses to Change the Product Cycle
Giorgio Armani on Slow Fashion Post-Coronavirus

PHP Code Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com