designer

A look at Issey Miyake’s most iconic designs throughout the years

A look at Issey Miyake’s most iconic designs throughout the years

Fashion

by Sarah Joseph
4 mins ago

Iconic fashion designer Issey Miyake has died aged 84 after battling liver cancer.
Known for his notable contributions to the fashion industry, Miyake’s pieces have challenged conventional design materials since the 1980s having worked with materials from plastic to metal.
With his pleating process becoming his signature, this revolutionary designer combined technology with fashion making his work known the globe over.
He founded his design studio in 1970, to produce practical designs that are now put on the global fashion map.
As we say goodbye to one of the most talented designers in the industry, we dig through the archives to present some of his most iconic designs.

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Images: Supplied/Getty

The Designer Childrenswear Brands Approved by the Royal Family

The Designer Childrenswear Brands Approved by the Royal Family

As the royal children took centre stage this weekend at the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee celebrations, all eyes were on their chic outfits — no doubt painstakingly selected by their mothers, and which will inspire legions of copycats. Here’s how to get the royal baby and toddler look.
Photo: Getty
From Princess Charlotte’s Amaia coat, to Lilibet Diana Mountbatten-Windsor’s blue frock from the same brand, Prince Louis’s hand-me-down sailor suit to August Brooksbank’s patriotic Union Jack sweater, the royal children looked stylish en masse this weekend for Her Majesty The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee celebrations.
Ever since Prince George first stepped out wearing traditional childrenswear – like shorts from Bonpoint and rompers from Rachel Riley – the wardrobes of the youngest generation of the Royal Family have been analysed and much-copied. And now that the Queen has 12 great-grandchildren, there is more royal childrenswear style than ever to pour over.
Here is a round up of the social set’s favourite luxury babywear, from La Coqueta to Marie Chantal, so you can dress your child like a Windsor.
Polo Shirt, £59.95, BOSS Kids at Harrods
Strawberry Smocked Dress, £109, Rachel Riley
Mariner Romper, £92, Pepa and Co
Lucia Cardigan, £50, Amaia
Briony Angel Wing Cardigan, £125, Marie Chantal
Multi Violeta Smock Dress, £88, La Coqueta
Noah’s Ark Romper, £61, Annafie
Maxi Check Dress, £130, Il Gufo
Little Toby Dungarees, £50, Trotters
Double-Breasted Jacket, £159, Bonpoint
Paris Dress Blue Branches, £30, M and H
Pink Satin Dress, £85, Children Salon
Originally published in Tatler.com
Read next: Saint West and Big Sister North Inspire Our Stylish Children’s Edit

Walmart Earnings Fall Short Thanks to Rising Gas and Food Prices

Walmart Earnings Fall Short Thanks to Rising Gas and Food Prices

Walmart is proving that even the nation’s largest retailer may not be immune to the economic pressures that are causing consumers to reevaluate their spending habits. 

Rising food prices meant more shoppers flocked to Walmart in the most recent quarter in search of grocery deals.
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The Bentonville, Ark.-based firm revealed quarterly earnings Tuesday before the market opened, improving on top-line revenues, but failing to meet Wall Street’s expectations after falling short on bottom-line profits. Company shares fell nearly 9 percent at the start of Tuesday’s trading session. 
“Bottom-line results were unexpected and reflected the unusual environment,” Doug McMillon, president and chief executive officer of Walmart, said in a statement. “U.S. inflation levels, particularly in food and fuel, created more pressure on the margin mix and operating costs than we expected. We’re adjusting and will balance the needs of our customers for value with the need to deliver profit growth for our future.”  

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For the most recent quarter, or the three-month period ending April 30, total revenues grew 2.4 percent to about $141 billion, up from more than $138 billion a year ago. Comp sales at Sam’s Club grew 10.2 percent, and 17.4 percent on a two-year stack. Membership income rose 10.5 percent. 
Walmart U.S. e-commerce sales increased 1 percent, or 38 percent on a two-year stack. Last August, McMillon said the company’s global e-commerce business was on track to reach $75 billion in revenues by the end of the year. The company still hasn’t said whether it has reached that goal yet.
Meanwhile, ​​net sales at Walmart International fell $3.5 billion during the most recent quarter, or 13 percent to $23.8 billion, negatively impacted by $5 billion, due to divestitures. The retailer logged $2.05 billion, down from $2.73 billion during last year’s first quarter, as a result. 
The results are a mixed bag. Walmart’s affordably priced food selection means consumers are increasingly flocking to the mass channel for their grocery needs. But McMillon added on Tuesday morning’s conference call with analysts that inflation is also lifting the average ticket price. Shoppers are responding by purchasing fewer discretionary items, resulting in smaller overall basket sizes. 
“As expected, consumers are increasingly drawn to the lower price points that Walmart can offer for groceries and Walmart is taking market share in food, but higher food sales is also putting pressure on gross margin,” Moody’s retail analyst Mickey Chadha wrote in a note. He added that the higher inventory levels “could lead to increased promotional cadence in the coming quarters if consumers continue to pull back, which could increase pressure on earnings. It is increasingly difficult to pass on higher prices to consumers while dealing with higher wages and employee costs.”
In terms of food costs, McMillon said there’s been double-digit inflation. “And I’m concerned that inflation may continue to increase. As it relates to Walmart U.S. general merchandise sales, we knew that we were up against stimulus dollars from last year, but the rate of inflation in food pulled more dollars away from [general merchandise] than we expected as customers needed to pay for the inflation in food,” he said.

Aside from rising consumer food and gasoline prices, executives on the call told analysts that additional headwinds came from higher-than-expected inventory levels (up 32 percent for the quarter, year-over-year), added fuel costs in the supply chain and increased labor expenses. 
“As the Omicron variant case count declined rapidly in the first half of the quarter, more of our associates [who] were out on COVID-19 leave came back to work faster than we expected,” McMillon said. “We hired more associates at the end of last year to cover for those on leave. So we ended up with weeks of overstaffing. That issue was resolved during the quarter, primarily through attrition.”
In addition, U.S. fuel cost the retailer more than $160 million more during the quarter than originally expected.

Doug McMillon, president and chief executive officer of Walmart
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Still, McMillon expressed optimism for the future. 
“Across our businesses, we had a strong top-line quarter,” he said. “There were some things that happened during the quarter that were different than we expected and we’re trying to be very transparent about those things. There seems to be more uncertainty now in a very fluid environment. And so, we’ll just deal with that.”
One way will be by slashing prices in high-margin areas, such as apparel, in an effort to manage excess inventory. While this might seem counterintuitive, McMillon said shoppers on a budget are more likely to notice. 
“Part of what’s at play here is [that] you’ve got food inflation moving up, but we’ve got general merchandise categories, like apparel and some of our hardlines categories, to play with,” he said. “And the beauty of it is [that] customers are even more price sensitive right now. They’re attention to fuel prices and high-food prices is high. And so when you bring [a price of] something down in sporting goods or hardware, one of these other categories, they notice even more than they would notice before and that makes the elasticity impact be different than it would be otherwise, which blends the mix up.” 
In addition, some tailwinds for the quarter included things like game consoles, as well as patio furniture, grills and gardening supplies, thanks to warming temperatures.

“In terms of the consumer themselves, we’ve seen strong growth with higher-income consumers, middle-income and lower-income, but we do see a definite strength with high-ticket items,” John Furner, president and CEO of Walmart U.S., said on the call. “With some consumers and others, we do see some switching, which would include switching specifically from brands to private brands. And where we see the switching from brands to private brands, we’ll continue to watch that for a group of customers, but we’ve got to all work harder to keep prices low for the American consumer.”
McMillon added: “It’s important to recognize that there’s more than one consumer. We serve the whole country. [With] the U.S. in particular, we’ve got a breadth of customers and they behave differently. [With] some customers, we are seeing some indications of change throughout the quarter, but that’s not true for all of them.”

Pieces from Walmart’s Love & Sports brand.
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Walmart has worked hard over the last few years to expand its assortment of merchandise, particularly in fashion. The big-box retailer now sells more than 1,000 third-party apparel, accessories, and beauty and wellness brands — such as Levi’s, Reebok, Free People, Jordache, Eloquii, Space NK and Kris Jenner’s home cleaning brand Safely — and continues to add to the scale and breadth of its portfolio of brands each quarter. Earlier this month, the firm expanded its distribution of period-panty brand Proof to approximately 4,000 Walmart stores.
In addition, Walmart has an extensive list of its own apparel brands, three of which are worth more than $2 billion, although the company declined to say which ones. The list includes sustainable innerwear and maternity brand Kindly, swimwear and activewear brand Love & Sports, and apparel brands Free Assembly and Scoop, of which luxury designer Brandon Maxwell serves as creative director.
“Maintaining price competitiveness is the key risk for Walmart in today’s inflationary environment,” Landon Luxembourg, senior analyst at research firm Third Bridge, wrote in a note. “As consumer wallets come under pressure, private brands will likely take the stage as consumers trade down from a pure decision of opting for lower-cost items. Walmart’s private brand portfolio, which was a focus area over the last four to five years, has now doubled its assortment. However, it has not grown consumer mind share and lack recognizability versus Target and Costco’s competing private assortment, which may be more sought after by consumers.”

Walmart anticipates current quarter revenues will increase more than 5 percent, excluding divestitures. U.S. comp sales are also expected to grow — between 4 percent and 5 percent — excluding fuel, while earnings per share are expected to be flat to up slightly, excluding divestitures.  
For the full year, the company expects net revenues will rise about 4 percent, excluding divestitures. Walmart U.S. comp sales are expected to increase roughly 3.5 percent, excluding fuel, while earnings per share for the year will decrease about 1 percent, excluding divestitures.
The company ended the quarter with $11.8 million in cash and cash equivalents and more than $32 million in long-term debt. 
Shares of Walmart, which closed up 0.11 percent Monday to $148.21, are up 6.7 percent, year-over-year.
“We don’t expect this miss to become a norm, seeing that Walmart has historically outperformed competition during tough economic times,” Arun Sundaram, senior equity analyst at CFRA Research, wrote in a note. His firm maintained its “buy” position on Walmart’s stock, but cut the 12-year price target by $3 to $162 a share. “The good news is most of these issues seem to be isolated to the quarter and margins should improve in the second quarter and the back half of the year as Walmart works through excess inventory and better matches pricing with costs.”

EXCLUSIVE: Roman Sipe Named Creative Director of Men’s Division at Cosabella and Journelle

EXCLUSIVE: Roman Sipe Named Creative Director of Men’s Division at Cosabella and Journelle

Cosabella’s men’s division has a new creative director.Starting this month, Roman Sipe will take the helm as creative director of the men’s division at the Italian innerwear and underwear brand, as well as creative director of men’s at luxury boutique Journelle. Both firms are owned and operated by the Campello family. 
“Roman is a pioneer in men’s underwear; he’s a true creative,” Guido Campello told WWD. 
Campello, whose parents Valeria and Ugo Campello founded Cosabella in 1983, currently serves as creative director of women’s at Cosabella, as well as co-chief executive officer, along with his sister Silvia Campello. “And Roman is an operator,” Campello continued. “He runs his business.”

Luxury lingerie brand Cosabella offers underwear in sizes that fit across all body forms.
Courtesy Photo

Sipe’s business ventures include luxury men’s underwear brand Menagerie Intimates, which he launched in 2015. The designer said he was excited to work with Cosabella — and Campello, in particular — because of the company’s nearly 40-year history. 

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“I’m a self-taught designer. I’m a self-taught brand owner,” Sipe said. “And to have Guido [Campello] as a mentor, as well as Giorgio [Latini], the production manager that we work with in Italy…the research and the knowledge that these men bring to the industry that I’m new to is key. I focus on the beauty of my lingerie and who I am trying to reach. But in order to scale and in order to build brand awareness and grow, I need a mentor within our [intimates] world.”
But Sipe, who is based in Fabriano, Italy, near Cosabella’s factories, is not completely new to the industry. In fact, he’s been in the fashion scene for at least 10 years, between L.A. and New York. His résumé includes celebrity stylist, fashion stylist (with brands such as G-Star and Seven For All Mankind), designer and founder. He also has a bachelor’s degree in finance, styled music videos, contestants on “America’s Next Top Model” and won Macy’s The Next Style Star Competition, a reality show competition that gave him the chance to produce a fashion campaign for the department store. 
“And that is exactly when I decided I wanted to design,” Sipe explained. “And I was like, what am I going to design? The first thing that came to mind was underwear. And I was googling underwear and I didn’t see anything that I would wear.”

Luxury lingerie brand Cosabella now offers underwear in sizes that fit across all body forms.
Courtesy Photo

In the new role, Sipe has been tasked with building out the male body form division, starting with the spring 2023 collections, across Cosabella and Journelle. (Campello and his wife Sapna Palep purchased luxury lingerie boutique Journelle, which has locations in New York and Chicago, along with the e-commerce business, in 2019.) Sipe will also assist Campello on creative direction for Cosabella’s and Journelle’s women’s collections. 
“I always thought I would be the creative director [of Cosabella] forever,” Campello explained. “I thought I had enough creative direction in understanding trends and movement, because I’ve been in this space forever. But very clearly, I think the speed at which the last two years moved, I realized there’s all these worlds out there now that are getting exposure and they need premium products, better products. And one of those places is men’s. The biggest step I took was to understand that I can’t speak to everybody. I know my world. 

“Ultimately, [Sipe] has a comfort level with teaching and talking about that product that’s different from other people,” Campello continued. “I’ve learned a lot already from him, about utility, solution underwear, solution undergarments in that space.”
Campello, who is based in New York, will continue to act as creative director of women’s, with some input from Sipe on the division. He added that it makes sense for Sipe to be based in Italy, near production facilities, in order for him to gain a better understanding of the entire process, starting with the supply chain. 

Luxury lingerie boutique Journelle in New York City. Campello and his wife Sapna Palep purchased the business in 2019.
Courtesy Photo

Meanwhile, Cosabella continues to build out his assortment for men, which launched last fall. Campello is quick to point out, however, that it’s not so much for men, as it is for the male body form. That could take the shape of underwear — which is cut in the same style and fabric across both men’s and women’s — but with added volume in the crotch area to accommodate for men, or bras for men, he explained. 
“We’re a very inclusive brand at Cosabella,” Campello said. “Journelle is becoming inclusive. But to truly be inclusive you need to bring in the people who do those things. Journelle does it by bringing in other brands that we sell. But Cosabella needs that influence,” he added, explaining the need to onboard Sipe. 

Sapna Palep and Guido Campello.
Courtesy Photo

For his part, Sipe’s wish list for the company includes creating sizing guides for men, adding in more lace and bra options, as well as bra fittings for men, while breaking down long-held societal stigmas around men — or the male form — in the lingerie space. He also wants to help expand the range of women who feel comfortable at Journelle by adding more choices for plus-size and transgender shoppers, among others. 
“The most exciting part is coming in and optimizing the male shopping experience: the product, the styles, what we want to do,” Sipe said. “And building what men’s lingerie actually looks like and what it means to actually design for the male form. We have the opportunity to expand what men’s lingerie means. 
“For instance, the fit chart is a really interesting thing for me,” he continued. “Because I know a lot of men who say, I wear a boxer brief. I want to build out a men’s fit guide that lets you know what is proper for what style of pants you’re wearing. I think that’s where my styling experience comes in. And to create a shopping space for men, because most of the time they’re shopping for their partners, their girlfriend, wife, for a woman. But now the goal is to have them come into the store [independently] for Cosabella’s men’s line and with my line. 

“I knew starting my brand, the gays were going to love it,” Sipe added. “The fashion men and women were going to love it. But as my brand grew, I started getting contacted by all different men. And [that experience] has been so much fun. Because all it takes is for people to see [men’s lingerie], to accept it. But also, to see it done right. To understand it and to break down all the walls.”

Target Taps Rachel Comey, Victor Glemaud, Nili Lotan and Sandy Liang for Fall Designer Collection

Target Taps Rachel Comey, Victor Glemaud, Nili Lotan and Sandy Liang for Fall Designer Collection

Target has some new designer friends, including Rachel Comey, Victor Glemaud, Sandy Liang and Nili Lotan. 
The big-box retailer revealed its Fall Designer Collection on Monday. The limited-edition assortment consists of more than 180 pieces, ranging in price from $15 to $80 and sizes XXS to 4X.  

Looks from the fall 2021 Target Designer Collection by Victor Glemaud. 
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“For the past 20 years, our guests have continued to express excitement when we introduce them to new and emerging designers from across the globe, all at an incredible value,” Jill Sando, executive vice president and chief merchandising officer at Target, said in a statement. “This fall, we’re building upon that legacy and bringing together four dynamic and highly regarded designers to introduce a collection of inclusive, on-trend and timeless fashion staples to re-energize guests’ wardrobes for the fall season.”

The retailer has a long history of showcasing designers in its stores and online. In April, Target tapped Christopher John Rogers, Alexis and Rixo for its 2021 Designer Dress Collection. The company has also previously worked with LoveShackFancy, Cushnie, Lisa Marie Fernandez, Zac Posen, Anna Sui, Rodarte, Missoni, Phillip Lim, Jason Wu and Lilly Pulitzer, among others.

Pieces from Target’s fall 2021 Designer Collection by Sandy Liang. 
Courtesy Photo

Meanwhile, the company’s apparel assortment continues to grow, even with so many consumers working from home over the last year-and-a-half. In the most recent quarter, apparel sales grew 60 percent, year-over-year, thanks to strength across loungewear, innerwear, activewear, men’s wear and children’s apparel. That’s in addition to a number of private-label partnerships at Target, including Levi’s and Journelle, and the mass merchant’s own apparel brands, such as activewear label All In Motion. 
“So apparel has been one of our strengths,” Brian Cornell, chairman and chief executive officer of Target, told reporters in November. “And certainly from a market-share standpoint, one of the real highlights from our business throughout the quarter. And we certainly see that continuing as we finish up the year.”

Takeshi Osumi, Designer of Mistergentleman, Dies at 47

Takeshi Osumi, Designer of Mistergentleman, Dies at 47

TOKYO — Takeshi Osumi, one half of the design duo behind the Japanese men’s wear brand Mistergentleman, died late last month at the age of 47. His brand announced the news Wednesday via an Instagram post.
Osumi was admitted to the hospital on Jan. 24 and passed away of sepsis on the same day. The brand plans to present its fall 2021 collection during Tokyo Fashion Week in March, saying that the designer was working on it even from his hospital room. The collection will be dedicated to Osumi’s memory, and a farewell party is being planned for a few days after the collection launches.

Osumi started Mistergentleman in 2012 together with his co-designer Yuichi Yoshii. It has frequently been a highlight of Tokyo Fashion Week, and is currently carried by stores across Japan and elsewhere in Asia, including Hong Kong, China, South Korea, Taiwan and Indonesia.
Prior to launching Mistergentleman, Osumi helmed the brand Phenomenon, which also began as a men’s brand. It eventually grew to include a women’s line before filing for bankruptcy in 2013. Earlier in his career his also designed a brand called Swagger.

Osumi was known for his imaginative collections marrying expert tailoring with street style and outdoorsy influences, often incorporating pops of bright color and bold prints. He blurred gender lines, and even though he designed mainly for men, he attracted many female fans of his collections. One of his chief sources of inspiration was music, particularly hip-hop.

Indian Designer Sabyasachi Gets Backing From Aditya Birla Group

Indian Designer Sabyasachi Gets Backing From Aditya Birla Group

NEW DELHI — In a major investment by one of the foremost retail chains in India, Aditya Birla Fashion and Retail Limited has acquired a majority stake in Sabyasachi, one of the country’s leading designer labels.
ABFRL, which has more than 3,025 stores in India, has purchased 51 percent of the Sabyasachi brand for 3.98 billion rupees, or $54.62 million, boosting Sabyasachi’s dream of creating a global luxury brand out of India.
Sabyasachi Mukherjee — popularly known just as Sabyasachi, or Sabya to those who know him — has been growing his brand steadily, with his sarees being a bridal dream as well as strong fashion statements. His accessories and jewelry have added to the brand’s strength.
With five stand-alone stores in the cities of Mumbai, Delhi, Hyderabad and Kolkata, his company had revenues of 2.74 billion rupees, or $37.6 million, in the year ending March 31, 2020.
He is also known for his slew of collaborations, most famously with shoe designer Christian Louboutin, and in 2020 a travel line in collaboration with H&M India, the fast fashion retailer’s first with an Indian designer. In 2020, he also had a special jewelry pop-up at Bergdorf Goodman in New York.
An astute businessman as well as designer, Sabyasachi — who is followed closely by the Indian diaspora across the world, with franchises across India, the U.S.,

A look from Sabyasachi. 

U.K and the Middle East — has been clear about his path ahead.
“Over the course of the last couple of years, as my brand evolved and matured, I began searching for the right partner in order to ensure continuity and long-term sustainable growth,” he said.
The collaboration strengthens the ethnic wear portfolio of ABFRL, which already operates a slew of Western brands in India. The country’s first $1 billion pure-play fashion retailer with revenues of 87.88 billion rupees, or $1.2 billion, in the year ending March 31, 2020, the retailer has brands like American Eagle, Ralph Lauren, Hackett London, Ted Baker and Fred Perry. Strengthening its portfolio in fashion with acquisitions, the ABFRL purchased the well-known Pantaloons stores from the Future Group in 2012, giving it strength in the value segment, and adding to an earlier acquisition of brands from the Bengaluru-based Madura Garments Lifestyle Retail, which included brands Louis Philippe, Van Heusen, Allen Solly and Peter England.
With an eye on the strong ethnic wear market in India, the investment brings in an additional strong base of consumers.
“We see a ‘Made in India’ global brand like Sabyasachi occupying the pinnacle of our ethnic wear portfolio,” Ashish Dikshit, managing director of ABFRL, said in a statement, underlining the ambitions of the group to craft a portfolio that addresses the entire gamut of ethnic wear segments: value, premium and luxury. “The Sabyasachi brand, through its emphasis on excellence in design and craftsmanship has set new benchmarks and captivated the imagination of the sophisticated global Indian consumer.”

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