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Jennifer Lopez, Tommy Dorfman, Noah Beck and More Star in Coach Mother’s Day Campaign

Jennifer Lopez, Tommy Dorfman, Noah Beck and More Star in Coach Mother’s Day Campaign

Coach is tapping some of its brand ambassadors to celebrate Mother’s Day.
The likes of Jennifer Lopez, actress Tommy Dorfman, TikTok influencer Noah Beck and Jessica Kelly appear in the fashion brand’s “I Got It From My Mom” campaign, which was released on Thursday. The campaign is meant to “celebrate the role mother figures play as mentors, muses and sources of style inspiration,” according to Coach.
“This Mother’s Day, we wanted to recognize all the ways mothers inspire and shape us,” said Sandeep Seth, Coach’s North America brand president and chief marketing officer, in a statement. “We also wanted to celebrate the joy found in the things we pass from one generation to another, and our brand’s role in creating special memories for our customer over the years.”

Jennifer Lopez for Coach’s Mother’s Day campaign.
Courtesy of Coach/Joshua Woods

The campaign is meant to have a nostalgic aesthetic as the celebrities were photographed on a set meant to resemble family rooms. Lopez, who has been a Coach ambassador since 2019, appears alone in her images modeling handbags like the Pillow Tabby and Pillow Madison.
Dorfman appears alongside her mother Cathy Dorfman in matching Coach-monogrammed outfits and the Pillow Madison handbag. Beck also appears in matching looks alongside his mother, Amy Beck.
Kelly, the niece of American artist Jean-Michel Basquiat, models alongside her daughter, both wearing denim Coach looks and matching monogrammed shoes.
Click through the above gallery to see more from Coach’s Mother’s Day campaign.
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Coach RTW Spring 2022

Coach RTW Spring 2022

The entertainment value of the “Coach TV” public access video montage may have been questionable (save from Chaka Khan’s turn as a tele-psychic, which elicited some cheers), but when the runway show did finally get underway, it was worth the wait.
Designer Stuart Vevers pared back the superfluous layers that have overcomplicated some of his past efforts to zero in on Coach’s history as an icon of New York, right up there with Zabars, Serendipity, the Brooklyn Bridge and the Eagle Bar, all of which were name-checked on clever souvenir-style graphic T-shirts and mini totes.

In considering American fashion’s legacy, from sportswear to streetwear, the connecting thread is ease. So Vevers went back to the well of one of the godmothers of it all, Bonnie Cashin, remixing her checked outerwear and signature hardware for today’s vintage lovers.
A pink windowpane check cape with turnlock hardware, rust-and-navy mohair plaid shirt jacket, and canvas raincoat with leather pockets were just a few of covetable statement coats.
Baggy denim skater shorts, some in Coach’s logo print; exploded houndstooth shirts with leather trim and turn-lock fastenings; T-shirt dresses with trompe l’oeil Cashin-era cardigan details, and throwback ’90s kilts for all genders were fun, commercial pieces.

Acid-bright patterned flared pants, denim vests, silk print baby-doll dresses, wool baseball caps and hiking boots added to the ’70s-meets-’90s vintage appeal. And the newest bag with kiss-lock closure, is based on the original “Cashin Carry” from 1969.
The lineup embodied what Vevers described as “how the next generation would reinterpret our heritage. This time I was looking at people who will shape our future.”
If they aren’t thrifting, they might just want a piece.

Megan Thee Stallion to Appear in New Coach, Bape Campaign

Megan Thee Stallion to Appear in New Coach, Bape Campaign

Coach has teamed up for a second time with Bape, the Japanese streetwear brand, on an apparel and accessories collaboration, and they lined up some high-profile talent to appear in the campaign: Megan Thee Stallion, Cordae and Kōki.
The collection launches today and includes ready-to-wear, leather goods, footwear and accessories blending the craftsmanship of Coach with the streetwear aesthetic of Bape. A limited-edition pattern that merges Coach’s signature with Bape’s Ape head logo is printed onto bags, hoodies and T-shirts.
In addition to images photographed by Sandy Kim, the campaign features conversations with the celebrity faces about collaborations and how they expressed their personal attitude through the images of the collection.

The collection will be offered for sale beginning July 24 online and in select stores.
Bape, or A Bathing Ape, was founded in Tokyo in 1993, and has become one of the leading names in streetwear in Japan and across the globe. Coach was founded in New York in 1941 and is a division of Tapestry Inc. The marketing campaign for the initial launch of the collaboration featured Quincy Brown and Kōki.

Tapestry Reveals 2020 Corporate Responsibility Report

Tapestry Reveals 2020 Corporate Responsibility Report

Tapestry on Friday issued its 2020 Corporate Responsibility Report, claiming it continues to make progress on its social and environmental efforts. 
The fashion group — parent to the Coach, Kate Spade and Stuart Weitzman brands — released the report for the fiscal year ending June 27, 2020. The report, Tapestry’s eighth year in a row, tracks the company’s efforts in areas such as equity, inclusion and diversity in the workforce; sustainability initiatives, such as supply chain traceability and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, and charitable contributions worldwide.
“Our Social Fabric framework is focused on three pillars: our people, our planet and our communities,” said Joanne Crevoiserat, chief executive officer of Tapestry. “It unites teams across the business to meet common goals and a shared objective — to create the modern luxury company of the future that balances true fashion authority with meaningful, positive change. Today, our commitment and resolve to execute against these three pillars of Our Social Fabric has never been stronger. In the face of unprecedented challenges over the year, we broadened the scope of our actions and built upon our commitments to shape the world to become more inclusive, sustainable and safe.” 

The annual survey serves as a sort of report card on how well Tapestry is doing in its efforts to be a good corporate citizen.

Here, a few takeaways from the report. 
The Workforce
During the last year, Tapestry started an Inclusion Council in an effort to increase participation of people with diverse perspectives throughout various levels of the organization in business decisions. In addition, more than 90 percent of store managers, leadership and U.S. corporate employees completed e-learning inclusion training in the last year. 
The company has also made efforts to hire and promote from within: 82 percent of leadership roles were filled internally. 
And Tapestry made the list of Forbes’ Best Employers for Diversity 2020, the third consecutive year. In addition, for the sixth consecutive year, Tapestry achieved a score of 100 on the Human Rights Campaign Corporate Equality Index, earning the designation as a “Best Place to Work for LGBTQ Equality.” 
Meanwhile, gender and ethnic diversity was a mixed bag across the organization. Throughout all of Tapestry, whites made up 42 percent of the workforce, followed by 26 percent Latinx, 13 percent Asian, 12 percent Black and 2 percent Pacific Islander. The remaining population was undeclared or of mixed backgrounds. 
At the U.S. executive leadership level, those with positions of vice president or higher, the majority also continued to be white, 76 percent, with just 1 percent Pacific Islander, 2 percent Latinx, 4 percent Black and 13 percent Asian. The other 5 percent were undeclared or of mixed race. 

A snapshot into Tapestry’s ethnic and gender diversity in 2020. 
Courtesy Photo

Across gender lines, 78 percent were women and 22 percent men. Women also made up the majority of retail associates, retail managers and executives — including Crevoiserat, the company’s CEO — at 80 percent, 80 percent and 60 percent respectively. 
In the boardroom the divide was evenly split: 50 percent women and 50 percent men. 

The Planet
Tapestry is working in an attempt to minimize its impact on the planet.
By 2025, the retailer is aiming to reduce emissions, conserve water throughout the supply chain and up its usage of recyclable cardboard and other paper goods. 
In line with its efforts, Tapestry began supply chain mapping and worked toward its goal of achieving 95 percent traceability and mapping of its raw materials in the last fiscal year. 
Also, the company reduced emissions by 50 percent, compared with 2017 levels. It also lowered water consumption by nearly 9 percent, compared with 2018 levels. In addition, Tapestry now reports that its packaging is made with 50 percent to 80 percent recycled content. 
The Community
Tapestry’s humanitarian efforts include the communities in which it operates. 
In April 2019, Tapestry laid the blueprint for its 2025 goals. Among them was the company’s plans to donate $75 million in financial and product donations to nonprofit organizations by 2025. In the fiscal year 2019, the company gave away $22 million. In 2020, Tapestry’s charitable givings totaled another $28 million. That includes $10.5 million in financial support and product donations to COVID-19 relief efforts and another $350,000 in matching charitable gifts by the Coach Foundation and Kate Spade New York Foundation to more than 400 nonprofit organizations.
The company also completed another 4,400 volunteer hours by employees around the world. That’s on top of more than 5,700 hours the previous year. 
“We remain steadfast in our commitment to building our business for the future, balancing true fashion authority with meaningful, positive change,” Crevoiserat said. “In further strengthening our resolve, we will be unveiling new, bold commitments in the months ahead so that we can accelerate the work that we are doing.”

Why This Extremely Feminine Silhouette Could Be the New Loungewear

Why This Extremely Feminine Silhouette Could Be the New Loungewear

While many women are working and lounging from home, they are finding a blossoming comfort in wearing the most feminine of silhouettes.
Getty Images
Life as we knew it was tossed out the window in 2020. When the coronavirus pandemic hit in March, away went dinner parties, art exhibitions, and extravagant fashion weeks. As lockdowns buckled most of the world down at home, ideas shifted with regards to how we should dress, beautify ourselves, and feel good when confined to home, seeing the same people, day in and day out. Life goes on, as does fashion. Adapting to the circumstances, the desire to dress-up persists – albeit with comfort.
Courtesy of Alessandra Rich
Along with stylish athleisure brands that are now stocked in every woman’s wardrobe, are also day dresses – the new loungewear. The trend took to the runways of SS21 in the form of slim dresses, often with pouf- sleeves and ethereal fabric, from Alessandra Rich, Coach, and Rodarte. They harkened back to the ultra-feminine, gracious glamour of the 1940s. These are accompanied by long, layered tunics at Fendi and Jil Sander, which can be easily worn at home or out in comfort. Middle Eastern designers similarly picked up on the trend, launching a host of dainty dresses for a wide variety of occasions. Flexibility and versatility are key these days.
Courtesy of Rodarte
At Reemami, Reema Al Banna devised several long dresses, some in tunic style and others with a tight bodice reflective of the Forties dress. These are decorated with the designer’s distinct artistic flair, with long, colorful lines and shapes and playful sketches. “While everyone is saying that leisurewear and activewear are taking over, I believe that dresses and skirts that make a woman feel good are still very much here and will never go out of fashion or be overlooked, even during these times,” comments Al Banna. “My collections continue to have easy-to-wear, comfortable dresses as well as fabulous dresses for all occasions. We will most likely use stretchy fabrics, like jersey material.”
Photo: INDIGITAL
Dubai-based Bouguessa’s SS21 collection includes long shirts in a variety of earthy hues, alongside button-down dresses. “They were designed with high comfort in mind; the material is natural fibers for the majority, allowing the clothes to be airy and easy,” says designer Faiza Bouguessa. “We want to focus on classic pieces with a longer life cycle, but at the core of this collection is the freshness of the material that brings this concept of day dresses and day wear as loungewear.” Lama Jouni, a Dubai-based, Lebanese designer, echoes the need for triumph but also glamour. Her latest designs include slim-fit halter dresses that are at once seductive and allow the wearer to move with ease. “As a designer I see the shift in the mentality of women when it comes to shopping; women want to feel comfortable, elegant, yet effortless and that’s what I want to offer with this line.” As Salim Cherfane, designer of Lebanese brand Jeux de Mains, known for its playful and disruptive designs, says, “We all need basics. We all need something to hold us together and make us feel comfortable with everything happening on the outside in this world.”
Courtesy of Reemami
The day dress trend whisks us back to another period of great cultural change: the Roaring Twenties, which followed the devastating influenza pandemic of 1918. Women were also theoretically granted the right to vote in the US in 1920. During this time, at the end of each day, women would hang up their house dresses and aprons and go out to run errands and visit friends. The dresses they donned were comfortable yet fancy with lusher materials. The cut and the fabric used differentiated a woman’s house dress from her day dress. The latter was made largely of casual jersey, wool, linen, knits, crepe, and rayon as well as silk, organdy, taffeta, and velvet. In essence, it helped mark a woman’s newfound political and cultural freedoms.
Getty Images
Saeedah Haque, a British-Bangladeshi designer known for her streetwear abayas, has similarly devised overlays and dresses that reflect our new era’s need for dressing with comfort and elegance. “Comfort is the greatest luxury and loungewear is the new power dressing,” she posits. “I love to disrupt the formal day dress and it is through challenging things that we can innovate. Comfort is a power unlike any other. I want us to wear that power and take it to the streets.”
Read Next: At the Saudi Cup 2021, the Dress Code Was Inspired By the Kingdom’s Fashion Heritage
Originally published in the February 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia

Exclusive: Coach to Host In-Person Show in Shanghai on June 3

Exclusive: Coach to Host In-Person Show in Shanghai on June 3

Coach is returning to the runway — but rather than New York City, this time the show will be held in Shanghai.
The brand said it will unveil a winter collection on June 3 with an in-person event at the city’s historic Shanghai Exhibition Center. The show will also be livestreamed on the brand’s social media channels.
Called “Coach TV: Live From Shanghai,” the brand is touting it as an “experiential runway show designed to transport guests and viewers to an immersive Coach world.”
In an interview, Coach’s creative director Stuart Vevers said the collection will build on the vision shown in the fall collection. It will include a few of his “favorite” pieces from that season — restyled for the runway — as well as entirely new designs. But because Coach has not held a runway show since February 2020, this will mark the first time the fall pieces will be shown on the catwalk.

All told, Vevers said there will be about 45 looks on the runway, a larger offering than that of the last two collections that were shown virtually and included some archival pieces as well.
“The winter collection will build on the story I introduced in fall, and it also marks a moment of reinvention and looking forward,” said Vevers. He said that will include a continuation of the color palette and silhouette stories that were shown in fall. “It’s not a start-stop,” he said. “It will build on what we started.”

Vevers continued: “Last year, I made a commitment to evolve how we do things at Coach, and today, this includes approaching seasonality in a more honest, authentic way. I’m looking forward to debuting this new vision with our return to the runway at a historic location in Shanghai –– and with a very special episode of Coach TV that will further reimagine how we tell stories, entertain, and bring joy.”
Vevers said Shanghai is “such a cool place. It has such a contemporary, modern attitude and I love the energy. It inspires me — like our home in New York.”
In addition, Coach is quite popular with the Chinese consumer. “Our client in China loves fashion from Coach,” he said. The ready-to-wear and bags are especially strong in that country, so “that’s another great reason to show there. It’s an exciting and dynamic market and way to reward the client the client there. So it feels very natural to show in that city.”
Coach actually showed in Shanghai once before, in December 2018 for its pre-fall collection.
In reporting its earnings in the third quarter earlier this month, Coach parent Tapestry said revenues in China surged 175 percent compared to last year, or 40 percent compared to the pre-pandemic third quarter in 2019.
“Coach TV: Live from Shanghai will be an incredibly exciting moment,” said Todd Kahn, Coach’s chief executive officer and brand president. “The experience is not only our return to the runway; it’s also a celebration of our passion for creating unique experiences for our customers in China, and all over the world.”
Unfortunately, with the ongoing pandemic, Vevers won’t be able to attend the show in person. But he’s been working to translate his vision to the team in China to ensure the show comes off without a hitch. “It’s really an interesting challenge,” he said, “like a lot of things over the past year. But it’s all about making sure we have the right partners and people in Shanghai that we can trust. It’s kind of extraordinary that we’re actually able to do this.”

By using Coach TV, a campy video experience inspired by American pop culture that was popular among customers and the press last season, Vevers is confident the brand can once again pull it off.
“This is going to be digital content blended with a live runway show,” Vevers said. “We had a great response to our last Coach TV so it felt right to build on that as we evolved back to a live show.”
But expect a return home later this year. Vevers confirmed that — barring any unforeseen flare-up with the pandemic — Coach plans to return to New York City with an in-person show in September during New York Fashion Week.

Coach to Launch Disney x Keith Haring Collection

Coach to Launch Disney x Keith Haring Collection

Stuart Vevers isn’t the only one who was inspired by the art of Walt Disney. Artist Keith Haring learned to draw Mickey Mouse from a Disney “how-to-draw” book at his grandmother’s house, and considered following in Disney’s footsteps by becoming a cartoonist. Although that didn’t come to pass, it did pave a path that ultimately led Haring to study fine art. Those initial references never left him and became a part of his now-famous style.
Now Vevers, creative director of Coach, has created the Disney Mickey Mouse x Keith Haring collection of apparel and accessories that will launch today. A campaign, created in collaboration with photographer Alessandro Simonetti features Kaia Gerber, Cole Sprouse, Koki, Xiao Wen Ju and Myles O’Neal and was shot in the streets in Vancouver, Los Angeles, Guangzhou and Tokyo, in scenes intended to be reminiscent of New York in the Eighties, where Haring lived and worked.

Myles O’Neal in a look from the campaign. 

The collection of glove-tanned leather bags topped with Mickey Mouse ears, along with shearling jackets, totes and sweatshirts, is printed with Haring’s illustrations of the famous rodent from the Eighties. The special-edition collection celebrates Pop Art and is intended to reflect Haring’s belief that art should be for everyone. The illustrations used on the line include Andy Mouse, Haring’s interpretation of his hero, Andy Warhol, drawn as Mickey Mouse.
“Sometimes the best design comes from the most unlikely juxtapositions, and I can’t think of a cultural clash that brings me more joy than Mickey Mouse and Keith Haring,” Vevers said. “Ahead of its time when it was first made, this art feels so timely today as we can celebrate and appreciate the diverse work of great creators whoever they may be, without social boundaries. As my collections over the years have shown, I love Disney and I love Keith Haring, so this collaboration makes for my ultimate treat.”
To introduce the collection, Coach created the Disney Mickey Mouse x Coach Exploratorium, an interactive digital experience where customers can watch exclusive videos featuring Gerber and Koki, learn more about Haring, Mickey Mouse and the collection, shop physical and digital products, and create their own street art in the style of Haring.
For the past couple of years, Vevers has created collections featuring Disney characters such as Snow White, Sleeping Beauty and others.

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