Capsule

Fila, MSGM Bring Romanticism and Seduction to the Roland Garros

Fila, MSGM Bring Romanticism and Seduction to the Roland Garros

MILAN — Just in time for the second Grand Slam tournament of the year — the Roland Garros, to be held in Paris from May 24 to June 13 — Fila is unveiling a new collaboration developed with cool Milan-based contemporary brand MSGM.
“For me Fila means tennis, and working on this project I had the great privilege to get exclusive access to the brand’s incredible archives, which have been a huge source of inspiration,” said MSGM founder and creative director Massimo Giorgetti. “For this capsule, I revamped and refreshed some archival designs adding to them the signature MSGM colorful, fun and modern twist.”
In particular, Giorgetti explained that he started working on the collection by embracing a cinematic approach, imagining the atmosphere of Woody Allen’s “Match Point” movie — “one of my favorite films,” the designer said — combined with Luca Guadagnino’s “Call Me By Your Name.” “It’s like Woody Allen and Luca Guadagnino are meeting on the Roland Garros court,” Giorgetti added.

The capsule, which is focused on men’s and women’s tennis performance outfits, which will be worn in Paris next week by Fila’s athletes, including Karolina Pliskova, Sofia Kenin, Reilly Opelka and Diego Schwartzman, has been unveiled with a short movie that Fila and MSGM filmed in a villa outside Paris.

“I wanted to convey a romantic and sensual interpretation of the world of tennis and I took the chance for the first time to explore a French mood,” explained the designer, who worked with film director Oliver Hadlee Pearch and an entirely French team. “We portrayed a sort of love triangle on the tennis court.”
The collection includes halter neck tops, mini skirts, shorts, polo shirts and dresses, crafted from performance Lycra printed with MSGM’s tie-dye motifs, as well as with a revamped archival pattern of multicolor marbles. In addition, inspired by the sexy and audacious femininity of legendary Italian tennis player Lea Pericoli, who in the ’50s shook the traditional world of tennis by wearing hyper feminine outfits on the court, the designer introduced lace accents, sensual cutouts and ruffles.
“As I do with my MSGM collections, I wanted to create a sort of claim for this capsule,” said Giorgetti referring to the “You are my match point” wording embroidered or printed on garments and tennis accessories. “I think it’s a beautiful declaration of love.”
The MSGM x Fila Capsule, retailing from $95 for T-shirts to $235 for jackets, is available exclusively from today at fila.uk and at msgm.it, as well as selected Fila stores in China and Japan. Later this summer, the collection will be also on sale at fila.com.
See also: 
Fila Extends Sponsorship of Ash Barty, WTA’s Top Tennis Star
Krost x Fila Collaboration
Katie Grand Designs Fila 110th Anniversary Collection

Jill Zarin, Ally Shapiro’s Brand Jill & Ally Marks One Year With Mother’s Day Capsule

Jill Zarin, Ally Shapiro’s Brand Jill & Ally Marks One Year With Mother’s Day Capsule

A year ago this week, Ally Shapiro (daughter of Jill Zarin, one of the “Real Housewives of New York”) started hand tie-dyeing cloth face masks as a personal outlet; her whimsical and colorful designs quickly gained social media attraction, which led the duo to form the brand Jill & Ally. Since its inception, the importance of giving back has been a core brand pillar — Masks by Jill & Ally donates one mask for every one purchased to health care providers, essential workers and organizations like the Ronald McDonald house. 
“In April, we had an opportunity to bring in white cloth masks (which at the time no one needed since it was not recommended). I literally tie-dyed them in my backyard, posted them on my Instagram, and it went viral! We made sure giving back was at the heart of our mission, and for each mask sold one is donated to a frontline worker. We have donated over 50,000 masks to heroes around the country,” Shapiro stated. 

Ally Shapiro and Jill Zarin wearing Jill & Ally. 
Courtesy photo

Fast-forward a year later, the brand not only has donated more than 50,000 masks, but grown from solely selling hand tie-dyed masks to an offering of mask necklaces and bags, casual tie-dyed apparel (sweatsuits and socks), hand sanitizer, playful beaded bracelets, candles and more. It also has gained celebrity attraction and a loyal following (noted TikTok stars Addison Rae and the D’Amelio family, Arielle Charnas and the women of TV franchises: the “Kardashians,” Bravo’s “The Real Housewives,” “The Bachelorette,” “Selling Sunset,” and more), and grown retail from selling on Zarin’s e-commerce platform to multiple doors. With a product assortment sitting at $130 and below, Jill & Ally is sold at all stores across the TJ Maxx/TJX Cos. chain, Ross Stores Inc., at specialty boutiques and will soon be launching at Saks Off 5th (with exclusively designed masks).

For Mother’s Day, Zarin and Shaprio have launched an exclusive collection of playful pastel candles for $35, as well as candy gift boxes for $45 in collaboration with Nosh NYC (Zarin noted the importance of Jill & Ally continually collaborating with small women-owned businesses).

An image from Jill & Ally’s Mother’s Day assortment. 
Courtesy photo

Speaking to the future, the duo will launch kitschy phone charms, a summer fashion capsule and noted having hired a designer (for future clothing designs) that will sit alongside current Jill & Ally merchandise, Zarin’s home line on the Jill Zarin e-commerce and with retail partners.
“I think definitely still affordable,” Shapiro said of pricing expansion into more categories. “Right now we’re still very casual. We have a few collections coming this summer that are more around camp and tennis/athleticwear. ‘Visiting Day’ is the collection, a campy vibe. It’s not loungewear, but it’s more casual — under $100 for most units except for a rain jacket. Definitely still affordable but in limited quantities.”

An image from Jill & Ally’s Mother’s Day assortment. 
Courtesy photo

Additionally, exclusive Jill & Ally candle and home decor capsules are on the horizon later this year (with retail partners yet to be revealed). While Zarin and Shapiro still have their hands in each process (Shapiro noted she’s continually hand tie-dyeing and personally packing orders) and are producing products both in the U.S. and overseas, they are actively searching for the right partners to scale and expand into more categories. 

“We’re looking for licenses now — looking to build the brand in the right way because we can’t do everything and we want to go to the experts,” Zarin said over Zoom. “If somebody wants masks, they should come to us because we can make masks under their name, we’re good at that. But there are areas we want to do but don’t have the expertise, so we want to find the best in class.”

Ally Shapiro and Jill Zarin wearing Jill & Ally. 
Courtesy photo

Fendi Gets Psychedelic for Summer 2021 Capsule

Fendi Gets Psychedelic for Summer 2021 Capsule

MILAN — Following the collaboration unveiled at the latest edition of Design Miami, Fendi teamed up again with New York-based visual artist Sarah Coleman, who cut her teeth next to archi-star Peter Marino and built a name for herself by manipulating designers’ materials to rethink everyday objects through an ironic filter.
The fruit of the partnership between Fendi accessories and men’s creative director Silvia Venturini Fendi and Coleman is a range of eye-catching products, from ready-to-wear to accessories, which have been collected in a summer 2021 capsule collection. The capsule will hit Fendi’s worldwide boutiques and the brand’s online store on May 13.
“Sarah has a great sense of artistic fun and clever irony. I was naturally drawn to her work and we first explored a collaboration with our Miami Design District boutique during Design Miami last December,” said Venturini Fendi. “We always love to partner with new designers who share the values of Fendi, yet with their own personal style. Sarah not only values craft, but challenges it with her subversive sense of humor, taking it into new directions.”

“My intention for the collection with Fendi was to be very playful and free. Silvia asked me to be ‘disruptive,’ to push the limits and get outside of the box, this gave me a huge amount of inspiration and confidence,” Coleman said. “She is so authentic to herself and the brand with a visionary’s perspective. I was so empowered by Silvia and the Fendi team to be myself. It was an incredible experience and I really cannot find words to express my gratitude.”

Fendi Summer 2021 Capsule 
Fendi Summer 2021 Capsule

In particular, Coleman offered her interpretation of the signature FF logo pattern that was twisted and turned, creating the FF vertigo motif. Coleman explained that she got inspired by the ’70s psychedelic aesthetic, which she mixed and matched with references coming from the brand’s archives. “[There] I found countless incredible images, materials, drawings and pieces that have made Fendi what it is today. Having access to explore and use this as inspiration was a major factor in what made this collection special for me,” the artist said. “I see logos as a neutral, you can bring them into anything and they work every time. The FF logo designed by Karl Lagerfeld is so timeless. It’s beautiful, it’s transformative, it just goes with every flow, which is why it has stood the test of time. There is nothing trendy about it. It is art, design, architecture, movement, all in one. It can be used in so many different ways, it can be played with, it can be changed, but at its core, it’s always this powerfully iconic print.”
In the accessories range, the FF Vertigo is printed or embossed on a range of leather bags, rendered in a summer yellow and blue palette. Standouts include the new Baguette 1997, a reedition of the legendary bag style designed by Venturini Fendi, featuring slim sides and a flappable handle, as well as new interpretations of the Peekaboo ISeeU design, now available also in a version for men, as well as in a smaller size.
Splashed on rtw pieces for women, men and children, the FF Vertigo motif also pops up on the featherweight Fendi Force high-top sneakers and on the collection of timepieces, showing the strap in calfskin leather or stainless steel. The watches are embellished with another pattern created by Coleman, the FF Fisheye, where the FF logo gets wavy, as if it’s being seen though a fish-eye lens.

A rendering of the Fendi Caffè at Miami Design District 
Courtesy of Fendi

Celebrating the joy of the summer season and life outdoors, Fendi and Coleman used their FF Vertigo print on limited-edition items developed in collaboration with specialists. The capsule includes a customized Vintage Polaroid OneStep Close-Up 600 instant camera; a bento box developed with Alessi, as well as a tent and a men’s technical backpack produced by Ferrino.
The Fendi summer 2021 capsule also channels a ’90s intentionally kitschy vibe by presenting a selection of Baguette 1997 bags decorated with bold sequins and intricate floral embroideries.
To celebrate the launch of the collection, Fendi has planned a series of pop-up shops and Fendi Caffé locations across the globe in key locations, including Miami Design District, Shanghai and Milan, where the brand is opening a customized temporary coffee shop at Rinascente’s department store.

Giuseppe Zanotti Explores New Art Forms to Celebrate His Icons

Giuseppe Zanotti Explores New Art Forms to Celebrate His Icons

FROM HEAD TO TOE: Giuseppe Zanotti has teamed with artist and activist Laetitia Ky to promote the second drop of his Icons project.
Launched last December, Icons includes reeditions of the brand’s most successful styles, which are reinvented with a contemporary twist while preserving their original aesthetic.
While the first drop featured as protagonist the Venus stiletto from fall 2012, for the project’s second iteration, Zanotti chose the Amira bejeweled sandals. First introduced with the spring 2005 collection, the Amira features metallic embellishments, rhinestones and beads.
Images released by the company depict the shoes as worn by Ky, known for the sculptural shape she creates with her own dreadlocks.

Laetitia Ky created her signature hair sculptures for the launch of the second drop of Giuseppe Zanotti’s Icons project. 

“For me, Giuseppe’s creations are like wearable works of art — they transport you and lift you up,” says Ky, who created hair sculptures inspired by the dance moves that models perform in the video realized by Zanotti to present the Amira reedition. “I love the creativity behind the Icons project and the chance to co-create with Giuseppe.”
“Laetitia is a source of inspiration,” Zanotti said. “Her work is at once emotional and modern and I love how she brings her own vibrancy and point of view to the Icons project.”
Previously, Ky collaborated with Marc Jacobs on a range of hair sculptures inspired by the American designer’s new bag designs.
Along with Ky’s artworks, the Giuseppe Zanotti brand will support this week’s launch of the reedited shoe — hitting Giuseppe Zanotti boutiques and online shop, as well as a range of stores around the world — with a talk on the Clubhouse app on Wednesday.
See also: 
Alexandre Vauthier, Giuseppe Zanotti Sign Footwear Licensing Agreement
Black Owned Everything Launches E-commerce Marketplace
Black Women Leading the Beauty Conversations on Clubhouse

The Attico Approaches Streetwear With Genderless Capsule

The Attico Approaches Streetwear With Genderless Capsule

MILAN — The Attico is approaching the world of streetwear.
The Milan-based brand, founded and designed by digital entrepreneurs Gilda Ambrosio and Giorgia Tordini, on Tuesday will unveil “Life at Large,” a genderless capsule collection focused on cool street attires.
The capsule hits stores this week and is part of the brand’s new strategy, which, as The Attico chief executive officer Stefano Marcovaldi, revealed last summer, now includes the unveiling of two main collections a year and of a range of capsules that can be focused on different product categories.
“For the first capsule, we started with ready-to-wear,” Tordini explained. “We wanted to step out of our comfort zone to create something very different, but that includes details and codes that are very signature of the brand.”

Although the designers employed mainly cotton, nylon, jersey and Neoprene — instead of the usual silks feathers and sequins — they actually couldn’t forgo some feminine touches, for example transforming a classic T-shirt into a draped, asymmetric top to match with coordinated baggy fleece pants. While oversize hoodies, joggers and maxishirts with applied pockets took center stage, Tordini and Ambrosio also created a T-shirt dress with padded shoulders and a drawstring putting the focus on the waist, as well as a draped miniskirt, all crafted from Neoprene.

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Along with solid tones of gray, chocolate brown, black and military green, the brand introduced three patterns. One features the letters composing the name The Attico reshuffled for an abstract motif, another shows an allover print of the brand’s logo creating a camouflage-inspired pattern and the third echoes the color effects of thermo-sensitive fabrics.
“We designed this collection with Milan’s cool kids in mind. I think it offers products that people feel like wearing now, thanks to the sense of comfort and relaxation that we tried to infuse into them,” Ambrosio said.
Carrying a full merchandising offering, the capsule also includes yoga sets, shoes, including flat sandals with chunky soles and mules with comfortable pyramid-shaped heels, as well as socks, caps, bags and eyewear developed in collaboration with Linda Farrow. 
The Attico’s new streetwear capsule.  Courtesy of The Attico

In order to showcase the versatility and inclusivity of the capsule, The Attico created a customized campaign, which involved 18 talents. The brand actually posted on its social media accounts a casting call. “We received 3,500 emails,” said Tordini, explaining that out of them, they selected 40 boys and girls whom they personally met at The Attico headquarters in Milan. “We talked to them, we asked them about their lives and their passions, it has been really fun, but also moving,” Ambrosio said.
The designer selected a group of 18, who are the protagonists of the images that The Attico will use to promote the collection, but also of mini videos where they will share their own feelings and points of view.
In addition, following the official release of the collection, The Attico will start an event on booming social media platform Clubhouse, opening a room where Ambrosio and Tordini will moderate on Feb. 23 at 5:30 p.m. a conversation among the talents appearing in the campaign. 

The “Life at Large” capsule will be available at The Attico’s online stores, as well as at about 200 international retailers.
“Our established partners were enthusiastic of this new street capsule, which also opened up the doors of other retailers which we started collaborating with,” said Ambrosio, highlighting that this range is complementary to the brand’s signature cocktail and evening offering. “Usually we dress women from six o’clock to sunrise,” she said. “With this capsule, we are giving our consumers new items to sport during the day, completing our lifestyle vision.”
The Attico will release another capsule in March, while the brand’s fall 2021 collection will hit stores between June and September.
See also:
Jordan Joins Forces With The Attico for Women’s Apparel Launch in Italy
The Attico to Skip Milan Fashion Week
Pomellato Launches First Capsule Collection

YNAP, The Prince’s Foundation Launch Sustainable Collection, Help Artisans

YNAP, The Prince’s Foundation Launch Sustainable Collection, Help Artisans

MILAN — Imagine giving young artisans exposure to 4.3 million customers and 1 billion viewers.
That opportunity is provided by The Modern Artisan project, which is unveiling the Yoox Net-a-porter for The Prince’s Foundation capsule collection on Thursday across the Yoox, Net-a porter, Mr Porter and The Outnet online stores at the same time — a first for the e-tailer.
The capsule is the result of a training program developed by YNAP and HRH The Prince of Wales, president of The Prince’s Foundation, blending and celebrating traditional Italian and British craftsmanship with digital tools such as data insights. The goal of The Modern Artisan is to strengthen textile skills and train artisans in the U.K. and Italy to produce luxury apparel collections.

“This project is the sum of my work for 20 years, of all the values that I have tried to infuse, the importance of data, of digital education and of luxury as longevity, so I am personally passionate about it,” said Federico Marchetti, Yoox Net-a porter Group chairman and chief executive officer, who considers this “the grand finale” of the 20th anniversary of YNAP.
The Modern Artisan has been in the works since spring 2019 but dates back to the end of 2018, related Marchetti. “Prince Charles came to see [the YNAP] Tech Hub in London and we discovered we had a friend in common; the human aspect is always fundamental, as much as technology. He invited me to Scotland to see what he does for young people to create jobs and his textile program. He challenged me to create a project that would have to do with his great love for Italy, together with his great passion for sustainability,” said Marchetti, who shares this commitment with the prince.

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The result is a fashion collection that is made by hand with luxurious fabrics, ranging from Johnstons cashmere to silk from Como. “This is not an amateurish project,” Marchetti touted. “The result is beyond my expectations in terms of quality.”
Looks from the capsule collection.  courtesy image

The capsule also relies on the information collected by YNAP’s massive data, allowing to perfect sizes and shapes in order to reduce waste and thus generating less returns. “The name of the project blends a storied profession with a modern tool,” Marchetti noted. It also relies on experience gathered through previous projects, such as the line unveiled in 2018 and called 8 by Yoox, which was driven by artificial intelligence. This followed Mr P, the in-house collection launched by Mr Porter in 2017.
Production of the capsule started in April 2019, but was stalled by the pandemic from March to August and was completed in September. All profits from the sale of the collection will be donated to The Prince’s Foundation to enable the charity to develop and deliver training programs that will help preserve traditional textile skills.
“There are fundamental values beyond marketing in this project, which bridges Italy and the U.K. in a spirit of collaboration at the time of Brexit,” said Marchetti, underscoring that YNAP is Anglo-Italian. “These are jobs that we cannot lose,” he added referring to the art of craftsmanship, expressing his pride and belief that it will be a blueprint for more sustainable collections.

Marchetti said the project is an “incredible launch pad,” since all of the 10 artisans have already found jobs in companies ranging from Ermenegildo Zegna and Max Mara to Off-White. “This gave one young person the confidence to even set up his own business and another is teaching sustainability at school,” Marchetti said.
The ready-to-wear capsule of women’s and men’s wear comprises 18 pieces, produced in a total of around 600 units.
Six Italian students from leading design school Politecnico di Milano’s Fashion in Process (FiP) research laboratory led the design of the collection, while British artisans were trained at Dumfries House, the headquarters of The Prince’s Foundation in Ayrshire, Scotland, producing most of the collection in the estate’s Textile Training Centre.
The artisans were bestowed a Modern Apprenticeship Award in Heritage Textiles in partnership with Glasgow Clyde College.
The knitwear was designed by the Italian artisans and manufactured at Johnstons of Elgin’s knitwear mill in Hawick, Scotland.
The artisans were granted exclusive access to five years’ worth of YNAP data on long-term preferences of the group’s 4.3 million customers and learned how to process image data and use AI visual recognition to inform the styles and silhouettes of their designs.
For example, in the women’s wear collection, details from the wide legs and midi lengths to the cinched-in waists and pussy bows were design choices that reflected customer preferences. In men’s wear, data was mirrored in a camel coat or navy trousers, as well as the drawstring detail at the waist of casual trousers.
Looks from the capsule collection.  courtesy image

Created during the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci, the legendary artist’s knots are a feature throughout the collection. His studies of drapery inspired the women’s wear, seen in folds, pleats, smocking, ties and bows. The men’s wear points to his fascination with architectural details.
Marchetti, who has championed sustainability since 2009, pointed to the Prince of Wales’ beliefs in sustainability for more than four decades. For this reason, the collection rests on cashmere and wool sourced from Scottish textiles firm Johnstons of Elgin that is fully traceable, and organic eco silk sourced from Centro Seta in Italy.
Natural and organic materials were prioritized, as was end-of-roll, and no synthetic fabrics were used in the collection. Each style is equipped with a digital ID, providing the story behind the product, its materials, the artisans who designed and made it, as well as care and repair recommendations for durability.
“Designed in Italy and crafted in the U.K., this truly sustainable luxury collection illustrates the vast possibilities of cross-border collaborations to tackle environmental challenges and train creative talents in these uncertain times and beyond,” Marchetti said.
The Modern Artisan project will be showcased at Michelangelo Foundation’s Homo Faber in 2021.
British Modern Artisans working on coats in the Textiles Training Centre.  courtesy image

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