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Björk’s Daughter Debuts as Miu Miu Face

Björk’s Daughter Debuts as Miu Miu Face

NEW MIUSE: Isadora Bjarkardóttir Barney, daughter of Icelandic music star Björk and American artist and film director Matthew Barney, is the latest talent to join the rooster of Miu Miu faces.The fashion house, which is known for scouting emerging talents for its campaigns and projects, such the Women’s Tales short movie series with films created by female directors, has tapped Barney to front a new campaign unveiled on Wednesday.
Marking the first time Barney poses for a fashion brand, the ads are dedicated to the jewelry line Miu Miu developed with artists Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg.
In addition to creating the colorful pieces, Djurberg and Berg served as artistic directors of the campaign, which was photographed by Julien Martinez Leclerc and styled by Lotta Volkova.

In the studio images, Barney is seen wearing the jewels and interacting with otherworldly creatures, ranging from birds to skeletal hands.

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Isadora Bjarkardóttir Barney in the Miu Miu campaign.

Julien Martinez Leclerc/Courtesy of Miu Miu

Dubbed “A Remedy,” the collection comprises colorful, naïve jewelry in the shape of flowers, animals and pills. The pieces are inspired by the artists’ 2015 sculpture series “A Thief Caught in the Act,” which represents whimsical birds stealing pills and tiny objects from a table.
“I first met Nathalie and Hans in 2005,” said Miuccia Prada in a statement. “Three years later we exhibited their work at the Fondazione Prada and since then, our dialogue has been constant. It has been so interesting to see how their work developed through time, encompassing different mediums, and always eager to confront with a new mind-set,” she said, adding that this approach “is exactly at the core of our ‘A Remedy’ project with Miu Miu.”
Djurberg and Berg said in a statement the project was an opportunity “to be playful and take on something very new. It makes you think differently, and new and unexpected things appear.”
In the collection, the animal- and pill-shaped charms were made of resin elements and hand-polished and galvanized metal with gold finishes. The jewelry pieces come in dedicated boxes painted with flora and fauna motifs in bright colors, matching the mood of the precious items. Upon opening, a carillon inside each box plays music composed especially for the project by Berg.

Isadora Bjarkardóttir Barney in the Miu Miu campaign.

Julien Martinez Leclerc/Courtesy of Miu Miu

The collaboration between Miu Miu and the artists debuted at the brand’s fall 2022 runway show in Paris, when a sportier take on the viral Miu Miu set introduced the previous season was unveiled, kickstarting the tennis-gear fever that is trending on social media this summer.
In the advertising images, Barney is wearing some of the pieces, but the ready-to-wear collection’s key items are in full display in Miu Miu’s main fall 2022 campaign released last week and fronted by Emma Corrin, Sydney Sweeney and Demi Singleton.

Fendi to Hold Show in New York to Celebrate Baguette Bag at 25

Fendi to Hold Show in New York to Celebrate Baguette Bag at 25

“IT” BAG TO NY: Fendi took Instagram by storm Saturday, unveiling an accessories campaign fronted by Linda Evangelista to celebrate its signature Baguette bag’s 25th anniversary.
In addition to sharing campaign imagery, the luxury house controlled by LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton said it will hold a runway show in New York on Sept. 9 to mark the bag’s anniversary which will come two years after Kim Jones joined the storied house as artistic director of couture and womenswear.
No other details on the show were available at press time. However, sources have told WWD that Jones is working on a collaboration with Marc Jacobs that could be unveiled during New York Fashion Week in September, which implies that the Baguette will somehow be part of it. 

Instagram netizens praised the campaign in which Evangelista is photographed by Steven Meisel against a grey backdrop holding two sequin-covered Baguette bags in different sizes paired with a grey sweater and satin baseball caps stockpiled on her head.

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The supermodel casts a diva gaze behind her pink-hued sunglasses and had fans on social media cheering her return in front of the camera.
First introduced in 1997 by Silvia Venturini Fendi, artistic director of accessories and menswear, the Baguette has been the ideal  canvas for many creative iterations over the years, including denim, embroidered jacquard, sequined, fur accented, hand painted versions and even a scented one introduced in 2019.
The accessory ignited the “It” bag craze and is currently enjoying momentum like other bags from the late ‘90s and early Aughts, tapping into Y2K nostalgia.
Back in the days its popularity was cemented after Sarah Jessica Parker’s character in the hit series “Sex and the City” sported a sequined purple version. She returned to show her love for the accessory in 2019 when Fendi debuted the #BaguetteFriendsForever communication project.

Lily James Sports New Hairstyle for First Versace Advertising Campaign

Lily James Sports New Hairstyle for First Versace Advertising Campaign

NEW MUSE: Long gone are the blonde days of actress Lily James, who earlier this year was seen impersonating Pamela Anderson in the Hulu miniseries “Pam & Tommy.” The British actress, who has recently appeared on the red carpet and on Instagram with a brunette mane, switched to an even darker, jet-black hairstyle to front the latest Versace advertising campaign — her first for the brand.Almost unrecognizable with a graphic bang and a dark shade of lipstick, James was tapped to embody the new Versace goddess for the fall 2022 season, posing for photographers Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott.
The beauty restyle echoed a similar transformation her fellow Versace muse Dua Lipa underwent last year, when the singer sported long hair in a fiery red shade to front the Versace fall 2021 advertising campaign, also lensed by Alas and Piggott.

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While at the time the images were dominated by the vibrant primary colors and monogram patterns of the looks, the latest ads, debuting on Tuesday, took an edgier turn, spotlighting all-black minidresses and tailored suits, latex gloves and leather accessories. These made for bold, graphic attires clashing against classical statues in the background.

Versace’s fall 2022 advertising campaign.
Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott/Courtesy of Versace

Joined by several talents — including Sofiane Belaasri, Yilan Hua, Avanti Nagrath, Reece Nelson, Parker Van Noord and Lulu Wood — James was portrayed oozing self-confidence with her fierce expressions and poses.
“When Lily got in front of the camera she transformed,” said the brand’s chief creative officer Donatella Versace. “Wearing the collection unlocked her own personal attitude and she took on a new energy and power. That’s exactly how you should feel when wearing Versace.”
For example, one of the images sees James confidently posing while holding the brand’s new Greca Goddess bag above her head. Introduced for fall 2022, the sculptural leather style is enriched with the house’s signature Greca hardware in gold, which also defines the chain strap to wear the bag crossbody and mirrors the metal bangles layered on James’ latex gloves.
“It has been so special and exciting to be welcomed into Donatella’s Versace family,” James said to WWD. “I have truly never felt more empowered since working with Versace and it has been extraordinary how wearing the clothes made me instantly feel like a Versace goddess. It is such an honor,” added the actress, thanking the designer “for everything” and defining her as “an inspiration.”
As the face of the brand, James follows the steps of the likes of the Hadid sisters, Maluma and, most recently, Iris Law.
The ads further cement the relationship James has with Versace, a brand the actress has favored on many occasions, frequently sharing her looks and appreciation for the label with her 3.4 million followers on Instagram.

Lily James and Sebastian Stan at the “Pam & Tommy” premiere.
HULU

“@Versace this outfit is everything I could wish for and a whole lot more,” she wrote as a caption under the image of the Atelier Versace look she wore at the Los Angeles premiere of “Pam & Tommy” back in January. At the time, James arrived wearing one of her boldest looks to date: a pink cutout blazer jacket layered over a silver, bustier-style cutout dress.

Other prominent red carpet moments included the Atelier Versace fall 2021 pink gown with high side slit the actress wore at the 2022 Academy Awards and the beaded number she donned for the Met Gala.

Lily James
Lexie Moreland/WWD

In addition to attires sported during press tours, James also opted for a pastel-toned frock from the Versace pre-fall 2022 collection to attend the brand’s fashion show in Milan in February.
Before the Anderson role, James played several different characters, ranging from Lady Rose MacClare in the period drama series “Downton Abbey” to Ella in her film breakthrough “Cinderella” in 2015. She also had starring roles in movies such as “Baby Driver,” “Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again” and “Rebecca.” Next up, she will be seen in the upcoming British romantic comedy film “What’s Love Got to Do With It?” next to Emma Thompson and Shazad Latif, among others.

Jennifer Lopez, Tommy Dorfman, Noah Beck and More Star in Coach Mother’s Day Campaign

Jennifer Lopez, Tommy Dorfman, Noah Beck and More Star in Coach Mother’s Day Campaign

Coach is tapping some of its brand ambassadors to celebrate Mother’s Day.
The likes of Jennifer Lopez, actress Tommy Dorfman, TikTok influencer Noah Beck and Jessica Kelly appear in the fashion brand’s “I Got It From My Mom” campaign, which was released on Thursday. The campaign is meant to “celebrate the role mother figures play as mentors, muses and sources of style inspiration,” according to Coach.
“This Mother’s Day, we wanted to recognize all the ways mothers inspire and shape us,” said Sandeep Seth, Coach’s North America brand president and chief marketing officer, in a statement. “We also wanted to celebrate the joy found in the things we pass from one generation to another, and our brand’s role in creating special memories for our customer over the years.”

Jennifer Lopez for Coach’s Mother’s Day campaign.
Courtesy of Coach/Joshua Woods

The campaign is meant to have a nostalgic aesthetic as the celebrities were photographed on a set meant to resemble family rooms. Lopez, who has been a Coach ambassador since 2019, appears alone in her images modeling handbags like the Pillow Tabby and Pillow Madison.
Dorfman appears alongside her mother Cathy Dorfman in matching Coach-monogrammed outfits and the Pillow Madison handbag. Beck also appears in matching looks alongside his mother, Amy Beck.
Kelly, the niece of American artist Jean-Michel Basquiat, models alongside her daughter, both wearing denim Coach looks and matching monogrammed shoes.
Click through the above gallery to see more from Coach’s Mother’s Day campaign.
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Irina Shayk Looks Larger Than Life in New Pinko Ads

Irina Shayk Looks Larger Than Life in New Pinko Ads

IRINA-TOWN: Irina Shayk towers over a gas station and an American diner in the new Pinko advertising campaign.The Italian contemporary fashion brand tapped the model for its spring 2022 ads, which focus on the label’s new Love Bag Click handbag, defined by a circular, round logo enriched with two tiny birds.
Photographed by Brianna Capozzi, Shayk appears wearing second-skin looks splashed with a leopard print as well as a minidress in which the animal pattern is jazzed up with sequins and sparkles. Whether in a catsuit, a body-hugging dress with cutouts or in eveningwear, the model exudes a sexy attitude while posing against the miniature, desert-like scenery.
“We picked Irina because she makes us dream, and with us I believe she will make our customers dream,” said Pietro Negra, founder and chief executive officer of Pinko. “But it was not only a choice dictated by the heart: After several researches we conducted on the relationship between the brand, current customers and potential ones, we have found out that the best formula defining our women [can be summarized as] ‘Fearless Beauty.’”

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Irina Shayk fronts the Pinko spring 2022 advertising campaign.
Brianna Capozzi/Courtesy of Pinko

According to the executive, Shayk is the embodiment of those two words. “She’s a woman with an incredible personal history, a daughter of a Russian miner who today is an international fashion icon. A beauty that is due to her appearance but also to her personality and self-confidence. She’s sunny, ironic and knows how not to take herself too seriously. With her grit and charm, she’s the perfect manifesto of the Pinko woman,” said Negra, adding that the model will be the face of the brand throughout the rest of the year. After the focus on the new bag, Negra said there will be two other chapters that will spotlight new products.
Further proving that Pinko is betting big on communication, the executive revealed that the budget allocated for this area in 2022 “is the highest of the last five years.”
In particular, Negra said the investment in marketing has been increased 51 percent compared to 2021. Without disclosing additional figures, he explained that the budget will be distributed between traditional media and digital channels, which will account for 55 percent of the total. To wit, the brand is committing to further developing its presence online, not only through advertising but also via marketing activities on social networks and in gaming.
In 2021, Pinko reported more than 240 million euros in sales, exceeding its performance in 2019, when it posted revenues of 222 million euros. In 2020, the brand’s turnover decreased by around 25 percent, compared to the previous year.

Snoop Dogg Tapped as New Face of G-Star Raw

Snoop Dogg Tapped as New Face of G-Star Raw

Snoop Dogg is embarking on a new initiative in the fashion world.
The rapper has signed as the new face of denim brand G-Star Raw, where he appears in the brand’s new “Hardcore Denim” campaign.
The cheeky campaign is a reimagined take on Snoop Dogg’s song “Say It Witcha Booty,” where he raps about the brand’s new denim collection while modeling some of G-Star Raw’s pieces.
G-Star Raw describes the campaign as merging its “hardcore Denim philosophy with Snoop [Dogg’s] signature blend of humor, style and backside appreciation.”

Snoop Dogg for G-Star Raw.
Courtesy

“I’m teaming up with G-Star Raw because we are both pushing the field, staying ahead, cutting the edge,” Snoop Dogg said in a statement. “We are both masters of our craft — leading the game. You know what I’m saying? We look ahead.”

Gwenda van Vliet, the chief marketing officer at G-Star Raw also said in a statement: “Snoop Dogg is a true original: best in class, real and outspoken. He is continuously reinventing himself and he merges worlds in unexpected ways. Our joint campaign is bringing that philosophy to life, and is a tongue-in-cheek tribute to all denim booties.”
Snoop Dogg has collaborated with other fashion brands throughout his career and made a foray into the industry with a streetwear collection created with Joyrich. His business ventures, however, lie more in the cannabis industry where he runs his brand Leafs by Snoop and cofounded an investment fund, called Casa Verde Capital, where he has invested in various cannabis start-ups.
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New Gucci Garden an Immersive Walk Through Alessandro Michele’s Seminal Campaigns

New Gucci Garden an Immersive Walk Through Alessandro Michele’s Seminal Campaigns

FLORENCE — Anyone expecting yet another fashion retrospective at the Gucci Garden in the year of the brand’s centenary is in for a surprise.
The exhibition venue has been completely transformed to reproduce 15 of the most innovative and groundbreaking communication campaigns by creative director Alessandro Michele.
Case in point, the theme of Gucci’s fall 2018 campaign — obsessive collectors — was translated into a room filled from floor to ceiling with shelves stacked with 1,400 cased butterflies, 110 colorful wigs, 420 Gucci sneakers and 182 cuckoo clocks across the height of one wall. Referencing the cruise 2019 campaign, images of a community of ark-builders — and any animal you can think of — ran across several screens in another room filled with hay — its strong scent transporting guests outside the locale.

“It was fun to try to reproduce these very complicated sets, and I now feel I am in a place that has been cleared of the past, which was wonderful, but we didn’t fit it in anymore and we didn’t want to be pigeonholed,” said Michele, sitting at a desk next to president and chief executive officer Marco Bizzarri.
The mood on Thursday was upbeat, marking one of the first IRL events here, while social distancing and masks were strictly enforced for the protection of a restricted number of about a dozen journalists. Michele, wearing an emerald green jacket over jeans, and Bizzarri in a checkered suit, were clearly pleased with the transformation of the Gucci Garden. (Incidentally, asked by one journalist what fashion item he wished he had invented, after blue jeans, already famously taken by Yves Saint Laurent, Michele said the jacket — and more specifically men’s suits, which “gave a voice to men and women, revolutionizing the world.”)

Gucci Garden, located in the medieval Palazzo della Mercanzia in Florence dating back to 1337, a few steps away from the Uffizi Gallery on Piazza della Signoria, was inaugurated in 2018, when Michele overhauled the label’s museum that had opened in 2011 under his predecessor Frida Giannini, to make it more in sync with his own aesthetics. Over the years the venue has staged several exhibitions, illustrating the evolution of the designer’s narrative in relation to the brand’s archives or dedicated to the exploration of masculinity.
“I liked the idea of the garden because it’s nature manipulated by man to grow in the place where the family sowed the seeds of the brand, and to have a container where we can make things happen,” explained Michele. “If we manage to even simply intrigue someone [with Gucci Garden], then we’ll have won. I wanted to avoid offering something deadly boring — 100 years may be a beautiful rounded date, but I see this as the first year of the future.
“I redesigned the spaces because I felt it was necessary,” continued Michele, giving a shoutout to Bizzarri for once again supporting his need for change. In turn, the executive said he was pleasantly surprised by the new Gucci Garden.
“And luckily I continue to be surprised. The last 12 months have been even more intense than our beginning at Gucci together,” he said, referring to the changes in the collections set in motion by the designer in 2020, with two shows a year according to Michele’s own creative pace, which also impacted the supply chain, for example.

“I like to be challenged, to feel a bit uncomfortable,” chimed in Michele with a smile.
Speaking of the exhibition, the designer said he “created a playground of emotions that are the same as in the campaigns, because they are the most explicit journey into my imagery.” Michele personally curated the exhibition, called “Garden Archetypes,” with Archivio Personale, the studio that designed the interiors.
“An archetype is the original form from which all copies are made, never able to be re-created in itself, and every Gucci campaign speaks of a unique and unrepeatable moment — expressing the spirit of each collection,” continued the designer.
To set this exhibition in Florence, “where everything started,” and referencing his first six years at the company, “our apparent and bold craziness,” was especially poignant, he admitted. His goal, however, was to create “a playful and light narration of images and references and memories of the years and what our subconscious produced. These are images that belong to us and that echoed in our mind.”
Asked how he chose the campaigns, Michele said the decisions were made instinctively and naturally, based on the “incredible experience” each had afforded at the time. “As in analysis, we dug deep in our subconscious.”
It was key for Michele to avoid any form of nostalgia, aiming for “vitality” grounded in the present.
He admitted “it was like putting [Jules] Verne in five rooms, it’s not easy to move from the beaches of L.A. to Berlin and the story of ‘Star Trek’.”
Michele’s disruption is clear right from the entrance of the exhibit, as colorful graffiti decorate the walls of the antique staircase in a reference to Gucci’s pre-fall advertising 2018 campaign photographed by Glen Luchford depicting Gucci-clad rebels occupying a university campus, challenging the establishment and asking for change, inspired by the bold French Nouvelle Vague imagery of the late ’50s and ’60s and the French 1968 student protests. The graffiti reproduce slogans in French that translate as “We are all united” or “Freedom, equality and sexuality,” among many others.
From Los Angeles’ subway carriage seen in Michele’s first campaign for fall 2015 to Berlin’s ‘80s nightclub bathroom the following year, intergalactic explorers, aliens, dancers and angels make up the characters stemming from the designer’s imagination.

Reproducing the spring 2018 campaign, interdisciplinary artist Ignasi Monreal created a giant hand-painted mural that took almost 900 hours to complete. It covers an entire room, ceiling included — with Michele’s image hidden among the many characters portrayed.
In another room, 150,000 sparkling sequins blanket the walls in a dazzling reinterpretation of the fall 2016 campaign in a trip through Tokyo, also photographed by Luchford, like several others exhibited. Elsewhere, a museum-style diorama serves as the frame to the creatures and aliens of the fall 2017 campaign’s trip to outer space. The painstaking details on the small figurines, from the necklaces to the Gucci shoes, are a testament to the artisans Michele worked with for the exhibition.
In one room, a circular projection created the immersive sensation of being on the floor with the all-Black dancers of the pre-fall 2017 campaign, which paid “homage to the elegance of Black culture,” responding to “the need for a better representation of the Black community in the fashion industry,” said Michele.
The designer’s new take on beauty is also covered, showing the first Gucci Beauty lipstick campaign fronted by punk singer Dani Miller, whose imperfect smile overthrew traditional beauty conventions, and the scented garden of the Gucci Bloom fragrance. Michele again thanked Bizzarri for supporting him in the choice of the unconventional models for Bloom, in particular model and trans woman Hari Nef, actress Dakota Johnson and feminist artist and photographer Petra Collins.
He expressed surprise — and some fatigue — at being identified with kicking off gender fluidity trends. “It’s just who I am and I did not invent gender fluidity. I’m happy that it’s been embraced but I don’t do politics. And all those ‘freaks,’ I want them naturally established and no longer underground. I’m now thinking of Grace Kelly films,” he added vaguely, laughing.
The exhibition will stay in place indefinitely at Gucci Garden while it is also set to travel to Asia, from Shanghai and Hong Kong to Taipei, Tokyo, Sydney, Bangkok and Seoul.
A virtual tour will be available online, and Gucci has also partnered again with the global online platform Roblox bringing into its metaverse a Gucci Garden shared experience that will open its doors on Monday for two weeks. Digital avatars will transform into mannequins absorbing elements of the exhibition, turning themselves into unique digital artworks.

“It is important to have spaces that are not usual to fuel creativity, which trickles down to the rest,” observed Bizzarri. “This overlapping of sectors can also eventually turn into business. It would have been stupid for us not to enter gaming,” he added, embracing an element of culture that is changing.

Kate Spade Celebrates the Experience of Gift-Giving in New Content Series

Kate Spade Celebrates the Experience of Gift-Giving in New Content Series

Kate Spade New York is reaching out to a new consumer with its “I Picked This for You” video series and gift guide this Mother’s Day.
Since 1993 Kate Spade has stood for optimism and joy, a message its new marketing strategy aims to share with the male shopper by way of tapping into the emotional experience of gift-giving. The video series features NFL’s Rob Gronkowski, singer/actor Leslie Odom Jr., dancer/choreographer Stephen “Twitch” Boss, and golfer Rickie Fowler and showcases the celebrities finding the perfect gifts for their own mothers and wives.
According to Jenny Campbell, chief marketing officer at Kate Spade New York, the inspiration for the campaign comes from the opportunity to help men be better gift givers ahead of the holiday. By tapping male celebrities, Campbell said, the brand is reminding the customer — both male and female — that the shopping process “shouldn’t be a source of stress but something fun, easy and gratifying.”

“We are constantly looking for ways to reach untapped audiences and know that there is a huge opportunity in speaking to the male shopper, especially during key gifting periods,” said Campbell. “We kicked off our male-focused content series earlier this year through a partnership with basketball player Kevin Love for Valentine’s Day, and we are excited to expand upon this concept for Mother’s Day with four new celebrity partners.”

Further, Campbell told WWD, the company wants to continue to show the Kate Spade New York brand through different perspectives as it opens up to a new consumer and gives energy to some of the brand’s favorite styles.

Stephen Boss and family. 
Courtesy Image.

“We worked with this diverse group of men to create content that conveys an array of gift-giving scenarios that speak to the way men shop,” said Campbell. “We wanted to make it entertaining, while also educational. The men we chose to work with have great taste, and when given the opportunities, chose amazingly thoughtful gifts for their mothers and partners. Seeing the assortment of styles that each of the men chose for their wives, mothers and mothers-in-law further emphasized the wide range of product categories that we offer.”
In addition to showcasing the products selected, the videos each convey an uplifting and joyful message unique to the featured celebrity and his family.
“I’m really excited about this campaign and the way our teams are continuing to innovate to position the brand through a diverse lens,” said Campbell. “Through these key gifting time periods, like Mother’s Day, we saw an opportunity to speak to the male consumer in a new way — not only for the brand — but in a way we haven’t seen done before in the industry. For me, it speaks to the level of creativity we have at Kate Spade, and the strength of our storytelling.”
Alongside the video series, a gift guide has been curated that includes bright and cheerful selections of Kate Spade’s handbags and jewelry as well as other accessories.
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