Barrett-Jackson

This Painstakingly Restored 1969 Mustang Boss 429 Is Going Under the Gavel This Week

This Painstakingly Restored 1969 Mustang Boss 429 Is Going Under the Gavel This Week

The Ford Mustang is most certainly in the running for the coolest American-made car of all time. But even among the model’s many iterations, which Ford has been churning out for nearly six decades now, there is a strict hierarchy. Up near the very top is the Boss 429.

As luck would have it, a fearsome, fully restored 1969 example of the high-performance ‘Stang will be auctioned off by Barrett-Jackson later this week as part of its annual Las Vegas sales event. The gorgeous coupé isn’t just for display, though. It’s packed with a massive mill that can still leave other drivers in its dust at 53 years on.

To recap, Ford introduced the performance-oriented Boss 429 variant in’69. It was born out of the need to homologate the 429 semi-hemispherical engine the automaker was using in its NASCAR racers. Thanks to its track-focused engine, it was a hit with enthusiasts, but would only be in production for two years. During that time Ford built just 1,359, making it one of the rarest and most coveted Mustangs ever.

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This particular Boss 429 is done up in Royal Maroon, one of the five colors the model was originally available in. Its body is more sculpted than other versions of the coupe from that year. Nowhere is this more clear than its massive color-matching hood scoop; to this day, it’s the largest to ever be featured on a Mustang. Like every other Boss 429, the entire interior is finished entirely in black, which thanks to a recent restoration looks brand new.
Just as impressive is what’s under the hood. The variant was a true muscle car thanks to a 429 cubic-inch V-8. The engine is mated to the original 4-speed manual gearbox and is capable of pumping out a hair-raising 370 hp and 450 ft lbs of torque. Even though the mill has been fully restored like the rest of the car, a special effort was made to keep all the parts that made it special in the first place, such as the KKX spindles, a rear sway bar and a trunk-mounted battery.

1969 Ford Mustang Boss 429 

Barrett-Jackson

The Boss 429 is one of several Mustangs that Barrett-Jackson will be selling in Vegas. There’s also an Acapulco Blue 1968 Shelby GT500KR and a 1965 Ford Mustang custom convertible with the engine from a 2007 GT500.
“Over the years, Ford and Shelby Mustangs have enjoyed a steady track record of stability and value among collectors worldwide,” Craig Jackson, Barrett-Jackson’s chairman and CEO, said in a statement. “But the popularity among collectors is not just about the value of these vehicles, they are also incredibly fun to drive or proudly show at a Concours or during a local cars and coffee show.
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The Stang in question is being sold without reserve. Barrett-Jackson hasn’t placed an estimate on it either. Considering the car’s condition and pedigree, though, it should hammer down for at least six figures.

Car of the Week: What May Be the Ultimate 1963 Corvette Z06 Will Be Offered at No Reserve

Car of the Week: What May Be the Ultimate 1963 Corvette Z06 Will Be Offered at No Reserve

With nearly 70 years of production to choose from, Corvette fans have literally hundreds of model variants to keep straight. To help organize them, enthusiasts divide Corvettes into series, from the very first C1 of 1953 through today’s mid-engined C8. Of them all, the C2 series from 1963 through 1967 comprise the true icons of the Corvette lineage.

Long before the C2 came to market, it began as a design study initiated in 1959 by Bill Mitchell, GM’s vice president of styling at the time. Called the Corvette Stingray Racer, it was based on a sketch by designer Pete Brock and developed further by Larry Shinoda. It’s difficult to argue that the C2 Corvette isn’t the most influential and enduring US car design ever. The coupe’s perfect proportions and timeless lines are as inspiring today as they were when new, and during its brief production lifespan, the C2 saw success not just in the showroom but on the track as well.

This 1963 Corvette Z06 will be presented at Barrett-Jackson’s Las Vegas auction, running from June 30 through July 2. 

Barrett-Jackson

As with other Corvette series, there were numerous C2 variants, generally based on engine displacement and state of tune. A 327 ci V-8 engine was offered throughout the run, while the biggest change came in 1965 with the introduction of a 396 ci big block. The latter was replaced by a 427 ci V-8 in 1966 and 1967. These cars were monsters, and while they assumed bragging rights for horsepower claims and for straight-line performance, they were, practically speaking, a bit heavy and not nearly as balanced and fun to drive as the small block ’Vettes.
It’s sometimes said in business, “The first offer is the best offer.” That’s definitely the case with the one-year-only 1963 Corvette Stingray. For starters, it’s the only model year to feature the brilliant “split” rear window, an element that Mitchell loved. Customers, however, complained about poor rearward visibility, and the feature was eliminated for the remaining years of C2 production. That distinguishing design detail may be reason enough to want a ’63 coupe, and of them all, the version with the fuel-injected 327 ci V-8 and rare Z06 performance package is the one to covet.

The low-mileage example is fit with an M20 four-speed manual transmission. 

Barrett-Jackson

Barrett-Jackson, the auction house that garnered 203.2 million in sales at its Scottsdale auction back in January, is bringing a pristine silver 1963 Corvette Z06 to its three-day event in Las Vegas, which will run from June 30 through July 2. A star lot of the sale, the car is also offered at no reserve, certain to attract bidders for that fact alone. The 1963 Corvette was notable as the first coupe in the Corvette family, as all previous iterations were two-seat convertibles. It was also the first ’Vette with independent rear suspension and, important for track competitors, the first to offer the race ready Z06 package as a Regular Production Option (RPO).

Offered on all subsequent generations of Corvettes, the Z06 package was the work of engineer Zora Arkus-Duntov, known to the faithful as the “Father of the Corvette.” Checking the Z06 option on the order sheet delivered a Stingray coupe with a host of performance enhancements. These included a thicker front stabilizer bar, larger-diameter shocks, stiffer springs and upgraded brakes. Snazzy aluminum knock-off wheels added an external cue that this was no regular ’Vette, as did a sticker price nearly 40 percent higher than the base model.

One of the distinguishing design details is the “split” rear window, only offered on the 1963 version of the Corvette Stingray. 

Barrett-Jackson

The Z06 package wasn’t advertised per se, and was only available with the highest-output engine, the L84-code 327 ci V-8 with mechanical fuel injection. An M20 four-speed manual transmission and posi-traction rear end helped deliver the 360 hp to the pavement. A total of only 199 examples were equipped with the Z06 package, making it a very rare C2. About the only choice left to the Z06 buyer was choosing the size of the fuel tank. This is one of 136 small-tank cars made; the remaining 63 being, you guessed it, big-tank models.

A fuel-injected 327 ci V-8 engine gives the ‘Vette 360 hp. 

Barrett-Jackson

Importantly, this car retains its matching-numbers engine and transmission, which is unusual since so many classic Corvettes saw frequent motorsport duty in period, making engine replacement common. Assiduous collectors will also appreciate the original jack and set of brake air scoops. Remarkably, the consignor states that the vehicle has only 4,295 miles since new.

The car is a two-time winner of the Top Flight award, given by the National Corvette Restorers Society (NCRS). 

Barrett-Jackson

Despite the low mileage, this Corvette has been the recipient of an open-checkbook, body-off restoration by Andy Cabral. It subsequently received Bloomington Gold Certification and is a two-time winner of the Top Flight award, an accolade given by the National Corvette Restorers Society (NCRS). A luminary in any serious sports car collection, this rare and desirable Corvette is one we’d file under the category “What’s not to like?”

Kiss’s Paul Stanley Snagged the First 2022 Chevy C8 Corvette. Now It’s Headed to Auction.

Kiss’s Paul Stanley Snagged the First 2022 Chevy C8 Corvette. Now It’s Headed to Auction.

Kiss frontman Paul Stanley know his Chevrolet C8 Corvette is a “collector’s dream,” which is why he wants to make sure it goes to someone who can really appreciate it.

The rocker is teaming up with Barrett-Jackson to sell his 2022 Stingray convertible at the auction house’s upcoming Las Vegas sale. This isn’t just any old celebrity-owned car, though—It was the first C8 to roll off the line during the last model year.

Stanley, who’s also known as Starchild, and the Corvette go way back. In fact, the sports car was the first new vehicle the singer and guitarist bought for himself in 1977, following his band’s breakthrough earlier that decade, according to Barrett-Jackson. He’d later become acquainted with some General Motors higher-ups at the launch of the C7 in 2013 and was even asked to help design a special SEMA version of that car the next year. When the 2022 C8 convertible was announced, he rushed to put in his reservation. GM noticed and decided to treat him to something special: the first car from the model year’s production run.

Paul Stanley’s 2022 Chevrolet C8 Convertible 

Barrett-Jackson

That’s right, Stanley’s 2022 C8 convertible is VIN 001. The rocker, who already owns a 2020 Stingray coupe, knows how special that makes the car, but it also made him wonder if someone else would make better use of the vehicle. After deciding he “couldn’t do it justice,” Stanley has decided the best thing was to auction it off.
“I want to make it available to somebody who might be able to get more out of it, whether it’s to add to a collection or to drive it,” he said in the statement.

Inside Stanley’s C8 Convertible 

Barrett-Jackson

The winning bidder will be getting more than a just a car with a rich pedigree and coveted number. Stanley’s convertible comes finished in a beautiful coat of Red Mist Metallic accented with gloss black aero elements including a rear wing. This hue is offset quite nicely by the vehicle’s Saddle interior and pewter wheels, which help give it a warmer feel than you normally get from American sports cars. Under the hood is a 6.2-liter LT2 V8, which is paired to an eight-speed manual and capable of churning out 490 hp and 465 ft lbs of torque.
You’ll have your chance to bid on Stanley’s C8 convertible during Barrett-Jackson’s Las Vegas event, which runs from June 30 to July 2. The vehicle is being sold without reserve and comes with an autographed Ibanez PS120, which is the rocker’s signature guitar. Be warned, though, VIN 001 ‘Vettes can go for a lot.

The First Chevrolet C8 Corvette Convertible Heads to Auction Next Week

The First Chevrolet C8 Corvette Convertible Heads to Auction Next Week

Another historic Corvette is about to hit the block.

Barrett-Jackson will auction off the first 2023 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 convertible next week as part of its annual Palm Beach sales event. The winner won’t just walk away with one of the most anticipated vehicles of the upcoming model year, though; their purchase will also help a good cause.
The C8 Z06 is a high-performance vehicle through and through. Because of that it features a retractable hard-top roof that helps ensure performance never dips whether you’re driving with it up or down. Powering the car is a naturally aspirated 5.5-liter V-8 that spits out a hair-raising 670 hp. The brutish mill features a flat-plane crank, so you won’t just feel that power, you and everyone in the vicinity will hear it too.

Don’t worry about whether or not you’ll like the color of the mid-engine speed machine. Barrett-Jackson says the winning bidder will get to customize it to their exact specifications. Not only will you get the first Z06 convertible, you’ll also get the Z06 of their dreams. You can also choose to take delivery of the convertible at the Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Kentucky. Not a bad, right?
Proceeds from auction will benefit the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. The full hammer price will be donated to the non-profit, which is named for the US’s first African-American Supreme Court Justice and has supported nearly 300,000 students attending historically Black colleges and universities, medical school and law school since its founding in 1987.
If you’re already dreaming of seeing the first Z06 convertible in your garage, make sure you’re in Palm Beach on Saturday, April 9, when the car is scheduled to go up for bid. Expect to drop some serious dough, though. At the very least be prepared to spend more than the car’s expected $90,000 starting price. The first Z06 coupé sold for a jaw-dropping $3.6 million at Barrett Jackson’s Scottsdale auction this past January.

Car of the Week: This 1967 Corvette Restomod Is a Rarity in Fit and Finish

Car of the Week: This 1967 Corvette Restomod Is a Rarity in Fit and Finish

Auction house Barrett-Jackson sets another grand stage for its upcoming sale in Palm Beach, Fla., from April 7 through 9. Some of the star cars on offer are from collector-philanthropist John Staluppi’s Cars of Dreams Museum, an assemblage comprising a diverse assortment of vehicles that includes 1930s hot rods, 1950s- and ’60s-era classics, and contemporary performance cars. Notable are some of Staluppi’s unique restomods, a white-hot category that has recently seen much interest and activity from within car-collector ranks.

It’s hard to imagine a better combination of old car and new drivetrain—in other words, a restomod—than one based on the Chevrolet Corvette Stingray. The classic shark-inspired shape, penned by Larry Shinoda and made from 1963 until 1967, is arguably the most groundbreaking US design of the 1960s, and is known among enthusiasts as the C2 series of the model. It’s a shape that even Euro-centric car aficionados have to admit evokes as much emotion as any exotic hot rod from Italy or England. It was certainly more powerful than its finicky competition, especially when fitted with the optional big-block 396 ci V-8 engine in the latter half of 1965, and the even bigger 427 ci V-8 from 1966 and ‘67.

The 1967 Corvette restomod being offered at the Barrett-Jackson Palm Beach auction, which runs from April 7 through 9. 

Photo: Courtesy of Barrett-Jackson.

“The 1967 Corvette is considered by many to be one of the most iconic cars in history,” says Craig Jackson, chairman and CEO of Barrett-Jackson. “John Staluppi’s restomod version of this famous sports car equals the custom vehicles built by the great prewar European craftsman.” Jackson goes on to tout the “heritage styling of a car with spectacular fit and finish” and adds that “the best aspect of this sports car is the modern engineering under the vintage body.” That engineering includes “a fuel-injected V-8, contemporary brakes and modern suspension.”

The example is the result of a two-year restoration and modification process. 

Photo: Courtesy of Barrett-Jackson.

The result of a two-year effort and showing only test miles, this resto-Vette is painted PPG Classic White with a red Stinger hood—the same hood that distinguished the big-block C2 series from its 327 ci-powered little brothers. But lift the hood and all similarities with its bygone predecessor evaporate like high-octane racing fuel at Willow Springs in August.
The old 427 ci power plant, with its lumpy orange valve covers, is replaced by a normally aspirated Chevrolet LS6 5.7-liter V-8, featuring twin throttle bodies and an air cleaner that mimics the original from 1967. Braided stainless-steel plug wires complement chromed, big-block-style valve covers on the contemporary small-block V-8. The engine bay is finished in smooth-satin Charcoal Metallic paint, looking infinitely more refined than what the owner of a Corvette would have seen 60 years ago.

The old 427 ci power plant has been replaced by a normally aspirated Chevrolet LS6 5.7-liter V-8. 

Photo: Courtesy of Barrett-Jackson.

A stock, period-correct C2 looks purposeful, but this custom Corvette looks positively mean. Thick side-mount exhausts, running under each door, terminate before the widened rear fenders and tubs, which tuck 12-inch-wide wheels up and under the fender wells. The knock-off Curtis Speed rims recall the C2’s original turbine design, while fat red-line tires add a nostalgic flair. And the lowered front end enhances the menacing stance. Under it all is a powder-coated Coffman chassis with a C6 Corvette suspension and Wilwood brakes at each corner.
The interior is fully custom trimmed in lipstick-red leather, though those familiar with the original C2 will immediately feel at home with Corvette’s inimitable twin-hump dash. Few color combinations look better than a white-over-red Vette, and here, contemporary seats replace the austere flat, folding buckets of yore.

The interior is fully custom trimmed in lipstick-red leather. 

Photo: Courtesy of Barrett-Jackson.

Modern touches include a Bluetooth sound system, Vintage Air climate control with Mercedes-Benz vents, custom door panels, a center console with billet window switches, polished luggage runners on the rear package shelf and an integrated wireless phone charger in the dash. All that good LS6 V-8 power is delivered to the wide rear wheels through a Tremec T56 six-speed manual transmission. After all, some things, like winding out a big-block V-8 and shifting into a higher gear, just never get old.

This Florida Shop Transformed the New Ford Bronco Into a 6×6 Beast

This Florida Shop Transformed the New Ford Bronco Into a 6×6 Beast

If you looked at the recently unveiled Bronco Raptor and found yourself wishing it was a little more hardcore, then Apocalypse Manufacturing has something for you.

The Florida-based builder has taken Ford’s extremely popular new Bronco, added another set of wheels, given it a lift and dubbed its over-the-top off-roader the Dark Horse.
By adding a third axle to the SUV, Apocalypse has basically transformed it into a supertruck. The off-roader now has a truck bed positioned directing behind its modified four-door cabin and its rear fenders have been extended to make room for the extra set of wheels. The suspension has also been tweaked to give the vehicle a four-inch lift. That may not sound like much, but just look at the images and you’ll see it makes a real difference. Other changes include a new bumper and light bar, giant tow hooks up front and a set of 37-inch Milestar Patagonia M/T tires, according to Motor1.com. It looks absolutely ridiculous—but what’s the point of a 6×6 if not to turn heads.

Apocalypse Manufacturing Dark Horse 

Apocalypse Manufacturing/Facebook

The modifications aren’t limited to the exterior. The truck is powered by a specially tuned version of the Bronco’s turbo-charged V-6. We don’t know what kind of transmission it’ll be mated to, but it will generate 400 hp. That’s about as much as the Bronco Raptor. Power will also be delivered to each wheel, according to AutoBlog. The vehicle’s also been equipped with a new exhaust system.
A price has yet to be announced, but Apocalypse previous builds start at $150,000. Considering the popularity of the new Bronco, though, we wouldn’t be surprised if the Dark Horse starts north of that. The first will be auctioned off by Barrett-Jackson next month.

Apocalypse Manufacturing/Facebook

Of course, the Dark Horse is far from the first modified six-wheeler we’ve seen around these parts. Post Malone has one, and over the last year we’ve seen a  6×6 version of the Mercedes-Benz G-Wagen and the X-Class truck go up for grabs. Apocalypse actually specializes in six-wheeled brusiers, including the Ram TRX-based Warlord, which costs $250,000.
Pretty soon we’ll be talking about 6x6s as much as 4x4s.

An Ultra-Rare 2021 McLaren Sabre With a Color-Changing Paint Job Is up for Sale

An Ultra-Rare 2021 McLaren Sabre With a Color-Changing Paint Job Is up for Sale

The McLaren Sabre may be less than two years old, but it’s already set to make a splash on the secondary market. A gorgeous example of the one-of-15 supercar just posted for private sale by Barrett-Jackson. There’s much more to the vehicle than it’s exclusivity, though. It’s also a beastly speed machine with a bonkers color-changing paint job.

The Sabre, which debuted in December 2020 for the 2021 model year, is the handiwork of the British marque’s bespoke division, McLaren Special Operations (MSO). An exclusive for the US market, the vehicle looks similar to the $2.25 million Speedtail hybrid but with a bunch of new aerodynamic elements, including a front splitter, side skirt, more angular fenders and a central fin that connects to a giant rear wing.

McLaren Sabre 

Barrett-Jackson

The owner of this particular example worked directly with MSO to design the hypercar of their dreams. It has a carbon-fiber finish that’s accented with striking “Pacific Colour Stream” elements, and features iridescent paint that changes color depending on your angle. (Crack open the dihedral doors and you’ll see hits of iridescence inside the cabin as well.) Although Barrett-Jackson hasn’t identified the seller, these panels, and the subtle “03” numbering on the front and sides of the car have led some to believe it’s the same Sabre that YouTuber Shmee 150 reviewed last year.
Unlike the Speedtail, the Sabre is a purely gas-powered vehicle. In the engine bay you’ll find a 4.0-liter twin-turbocharged V-8. The mill is connected to a seven-speed dual clutch transmission that sends power to the rear axle and generates 824 horses and 590 ft lbs of twist. It can also reach a top speed of 218 mph, which makes it the brand’s fastest two-seater.

Inside the Sabre 

Barrett-Jackson

Barrett-Jackson hasn’t revealed the car’s price, so you’ll need to reach out to them for an official quote. Since it has only 193 miles on the odometer and looks to be in impeccable shape, we’d be surprised if the owner is asking for anything less than the car’s original $3.8 million sticker price. Either way, the sale will tell us a lot about the value of the Sable on the secondary market.

From Porsche to McLaren: The 5 Most Expensive Cars Sold at Barrett-Jackson’s Bonkers $203 Million January Auction

From Porsche to McLaren: The 5 Most Expensive Cars Sold at Barrett-Jackson’s Bonkers $203 Million January Auction

Barrett-Jackson just had a January it won’t soon forget.

The automotive auction house brought in a record $203.2 million at its recent nine-day Scottsdale sale. All told, 1,857 vehicles hammered down for over $195.9 million, while 1,153 pieces of automobilia earned an additional $7.3 million. Even better, the auction raised $8.8 million for charity with proceeds from 10 select cars going to Operation Homefront, a non-profit that seeks to provide support for military and veteran families. Among the cars earmarked for the charity auction was the first example of the new Chevrolet Corvette Z06, which sold for $3.6 million—40 times more than the new model’s sticker price.

Of course, the non-charity portion of the auction offered its share of head-turning four-wheelers, from vintage rides to contemporary sports cars. Below are the top five lots from what Barrett-Jackson is calling the most successful car collector auction in its 50-year history.

2004 Porsche Carrera GT — $1,980,000

The 2004 Porsche Carrera GT 

Barrett-Jackson

The 2004 Porsche Carrera GT is a snazzy 6-speed in GT silver metallic. Equipped with removable roof panels, the interior comes decked out in dark gray leather with racing-style seats with carbon fiber and Kevlar shells. It’s powered by a 5.7-liter quad-cam V-10 engine coupled with a 6-speed manual transmission, pumping out 650 hp and 435 ft lbs of torque.

1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing — $1,870,000

The 1955 Mercedes 300SL Gullwing 

Barrett-Jackson

This fire-engine red Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing, one of just 855 made in 1955, once belonged to professional race car driver Santiago “Chaquito” Gonzalez, who drove it to first place at the 1957 Havana Gran Pix National Race. The gorgeous model features its original incline-6 engine with Bosch mechanical direct fuel injection and dry-sump lubrication. The exterior did receive restoration in the 1990s, including a new interior and rebuilt engine, transmission and brakes.

2015 Porsche 918 Spyder — $1,815,000

The 2015 Porsche 918 Spyder Hybrid 

Barrett-Jackson

This 2015 Porsche 918 Spyder is one of only 918 hybrid hypercars produced by the marque. Its sleek all-white body is complemented by red leather interior. Under the hood, there’s a brawny 4.6-liter V-8 paired with a 7-speed PDK dual-clutch transmission that churns out 608 hp at 8,700 rpm. Combined with two electric motors located on the front and rear axles, the 918 can top out at 887 hp and 944 ft lbs of torque. It’s logged just 377 miles, according to Barrett-Jackson.

2014 McLaren P1 — $1,705,000

The 2014 McLaren P1 in liquid silver. 

Barrett-Jackson

The 2014 McLaren P1, which sold for $1.7 million, is coated in “F1 Liquid Silver” that looks like something out of Terminator 3. Meanwhile, the 3.8-liter twin-turbo V-8 engine features 644 ft lbs of torque and a brake steering system taken from Formula 1. The PL can reach a top speed of 217 mph, and rocket from zero to 62 mph in just 2.8 seconds. Liquid silver indeed.

2019 Ford GT Heritage — $1,650,000

The 2019 Ford GT Heritage 

Barrett-Jackson

For those wanting a genuine track monster, the 2019 Ford GT Heritage filled the bill. The Heritage Edition model, which celebrates four consecutive victories at Le Mans by Ford, pays homage to the famous Gulf Oil blue and orange paint scheme, with a big No. 9 graphics displayed on the hood and doors. The GT comes with a 647 hp turbocharged 3.5-liter EcoBoost V6 engine and a 7-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission. This limited-edition model has less than 20 miles registered, so it’s basically brand new.

The First Chevrolet C8 Corvette Z06 Just Sold for $3.6 Million at an Auction to Benefit Veterans

The First Chevrolet C8 Corvette Z06 Just Sold for $3.6 Million at an Auction to Benefit Veterans

People might be even more excited about the new Chevrolet Corvette Z06 than we thought.

The first example of the C8’s upcoming high-performance variant sold for a jaw-dropping $3.6 million at Barrett-Jackson’s Scottsdale auction event this past Saturday, according to a press release. All proceeds from the sale of the vehicle, which was donated by the Detroit automaker, will go to Operation Homefront.

The 2023 Z06 is one of the most intriguing sports cars on the horizon because of a number of racing-style upgrades, including a 5.5-liter flat-plane crank V-8 that spits out 670 hp. That said, we’re guessing the winning bidder, NASCAR team owner Rick Hendrick, was just as motivated by the chance to help out. This isn’t the first C8 auction he’s won, either. Hendrick also bought the first C8 Stingray for $3 million back in 2020, with the proceeds from that auction going to the Detroit Children’s Fund.

2023 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 with Z07 performance package 

Chevrolet

All of the money from the latest auction is headed to Operation Homefront. Established in 2002, the non-profit seeks to provide support for military and veteran families in all 50 states. The group provides short-term financial assistance and helps families find transitional and permanent housing.
“The proceeds from the sale of this sensational Corvette Z06 will go a long way to helping us help our military families overcome their financial hardships and have the opportunity to thrive in the communities— our communities—they’ve worked so hard to protect,” Brig. Gen. (retired) John I. Pray Jr., president and CEO of Operation Homefront, said in a statement.
Saturday’s sale set a new charity auction record for Barrett-Jackson. ‘Vette lovers can expect to get their hands on the new Z06 for a lot less than Hendrick paid at the event. Chevy has announced that the variant will start at $90,000, and has even warned dealers against charging exorbitant markups for the coveted sports car.
Now, let’s just hope that production of the latest C8, which has been hampered by delays and other issues, can keep up with demand.

Burt Reynolds’s Iconic ‘77 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am Is Heading to Auction

Burt Reynolds’s Iconic ‘77 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am Is Heading to Auction

Burt Reynolds and the Pontiac Firebird Trans Am are two American icons that have been inextricably linked since the ’70s. The late actor famously drove the muscle car in the sleeper hit Smokey and the Bandit, before he added one to his own collection. Now, that very Trans Am is heading to auction.

The car in question is a pristine 1977 Trans Am Special Edition that sports a striking black-and-gold finish. The promotional vehicle was gifted to Reynolds as a thank you for his top-notch turn in the famed 1977 flick. To be clear, this is not the Pontiac that appeared on screen, but it’s certainly a star in its own right. It’s also the only ‘77 Trans Am that Reynolds ever owned. The retro gem will go under the gavel without reserve at Barrett-Jackson’s Scottsdale auction this coming Saturday.

For the unversed, Smokey and the Bandit follows two bootleggers, Bo “Bandit” Darville (Burt Reynolds) and Cledus “Snowman” Snow (Jerry Reed), who are trying to illegally transport 400 cases of Coors from Texarkana to Atlanta. After a relatively modest release, it went on to make $126.7 million to become the second-highest-grossing movie of ‘77.

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Under the hood, the black beast is equipped with a 6.6-liter V-8 mated to an M40 three-speed automatic transmission. Rated at 185 hp and 320 ft lbs of torque, it delivers just the right amount of oomph for a bandit. The car was also optioned with a twin-hatch T-roof, black leather interior and the all-important A/C.
The legendary leading man reportedly only drove the vintage four-wheeler on rare occasions, before he eventually sold it in 2014. The second owner meticulously restored the car to its former glory, all the while preserving the hand-painted “Bandit” lettering atop each door and the scuff marks left by a certain bandit’s cowboy boots on the driver’s sill plate.
That’s not the only sign of Reynolds. The actor also autographed the glovebox and there is an engraved dedication plate on the driver’s door. The car also comes with a signed copy of Burt Reynolds’ autobiography, a 1970s-style Trans Am jacket and a “Bandit” cowboy, as well as a copy of the film that started it all.

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